Seth Kaller, Inc.

Inspired by History


Browse by Category

Abraham Lincoln

African American

Bill of Rights

Civil War

Declaration of Independence

Elections

Featured Inventory

Franklin Roosevelt

George Washington

Gettysburg

Great Gifts

Judaica and Israel

Maps

Presidential

Revolutionary War

Stocks and Bonds

Thomas Jefferson

Women's Rights

George Washington
George Washington

Sort by:
Page of 3 (56 items) — show per page
Next »

Major Washington Serves Notice to the French that They Were Encroaching on Crown Property

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Maryland Gazette. January 23, 1755, Annapolis, Md. Jonas Green. 2 pp. (complete), 9½ x 14½ in.

   More...

The Maryland Gazette took a particular interest in Washington, being the first to publish his Journal describing his expedition to the Ohio.

Item #21557.06, $2,600

A Synopsis of the Early Actions of George Washington Against the French

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Maryland Gazette. January 9, 1755, Annapolis, Md. Jonas Green. 2 pp. (complete), 9½ x 14½ in.

   More...

The Maryland Gazette took a particular interest in Washington, being the first to publish his Journal describing his expedition to the Ohio.

Item #21557.05, $2,000

Virginia’s Concerns about the Depredations of the French in the Ohio Valley

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Maryland Gazette. November 7, 1754, Annapolis, Md. Jonas Green. 2 pp. (complete), 9½ x 14½ in.

   More...

Item #21557.04, $2,000

Colonel Washington Refuses to Accept French Deserters Just Before His Defeat at the Battle of Great Meadows

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Maryland Gazette. October 17, 1754. Annapolis, Md. Jonas Green, 4 pp., 9½ x 14½ in.

   More...

The Maryland Gazette took a particular interest in Washington, being the first to publish his Journal describing his expedition to the Ohio.

Item #21557.02, $2,400

Virginia Governor Dinwiddie and the Council Respond to French Incursions by Sending a Young George Washington to Ohio

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Maryland Gazette. March 14, 1754, Annapolis, Md. Jonas Green 4 pp., 9½ x 14½ in.

   More...

The Maryland Gazette took a particular interest in Washington, being the first to publish his Journal describing his expedition to the Ohio.

Item #21557.01, $4,000

Miniature Portrait of George Washington

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Painting. George Washington miniature. ca. 19th century. Approx 2½ x 3¼ overall, signed “Beck” in hardwood frame.

   More...

Demonstrating the lasting appeal of Washington in the decorative arts, this nineteenth-century miniature on ivory is a fine example of the style. Acquired in Scotland.

Item #22317.01, $650

The Declaration of Independence:
The First Newspaper Printing, the Second Publication in Any Form and the First to Closely Follow Thomas Jefferson’s Style (SOLD)

[DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE], Newspaper. The Pennsylvania Evening Post, Saturday, July 6, 1776, Philadelphia: Benjamin Towne, 4 pages (8½ x 10 in.)

   More...

Item #DOI - 7-6-1776, SOLD — please inquire about other items

George Washington’s Funeral - Full Page Report of the First President’s Actual Interment a Week before the Nation’s Official Mourning

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. The True American Commercial Advertiser, Philadelphia, Pa., Samuel Bradford, December 24, 1799. 4 pp., 12¾ x 20 in. On blue-rag paper.

   More...

Printed within a black mourning border, news headed “Sacred to the Memory of Gen. George Washington” begins a nearly full-page description of Washington’s funeral, including a diagram of the procession, statements of Congress and of President Adams, and a resolution to erect a monument. The nation’s first president had died on December 14, 1799, and was interred at Mount Vernon by his family four days later. This newspaper reports the proceedings of a private funeral that included clergy, Masonic brothers, and local citizens. As the president was laid to rest in the family’s receiving vault, vessels in the Potomac River fired a final salute to the commander in chief.

News reached Philadelphia, then the seat of the federal government, on the day of his burial. Congress and President Adams immediately began planning an official mourning procession for December 26, and this paper of December 24 notes that Richard Henry Lee had been chosen to deliver the official eulogy.

Item #23417, $2,950

Lady Washington’s Reception Engraving

[MARTHA WASHINGTON], “Lady Washington’s Reception./ From the original Picture in the possession of A. T. Stewart, Esq.” Engraving by Alexander Hay Ritchie, after a painting by Daniel Huntington. New York, Emil Seitz, 1865. 37 x 25 in.

   More...

Item #23068, $5,500

A New York Newspaper Printing of George Washington’s
First Thanksgiving Proclamation (SOLD)

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Gazette of the United States. New York, N.Y., October 7, 1789. 4 pp., 9½ x 14¾ in. Disbound, with the two leaves separated, but complete and otherwise fine.

   More...

On September 28, 1789, just before the closing of the First Federal Congress, the Senate added its assent to a House resolution requesting that George Washington be asked to call for a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. Later that day, Congress ratified the Bill of Rights to be sent to the states for their ratification, and on the next day the first session of the first Federal Congress was adjourned. On October 3, George Washington issued America’s first presidential Thanksgiving Proclamation and the Gazette printed it in full in the next edition of the newspaper.

Item #23257, SOLD — please inquire about other items

A Front Page Printing of Washington’s
Second State-of-the-Union Address

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Columbian Centinel, Boston, Mass., December 22, 1790. 4 pp., disbound.

   More...

Item #30001.22, $1,450

Congress Votes to Erect a Lighthouse on Montauk Point; and a Section of Alexander Hamilton’s Seminal Report on Manufactures Regarding Cotton

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. The United States Chronicle: Political, Commercial, and Historical. Providence, R.I., May 10, 1792. 4 pp., 11 x 17 in.

   More...

The second U.S. Congress votes to fund building a lighthouse on Montauk Point, the easternmost point on Long Island, as an aid to navigation, on the front page.

Item #22937, $3,500

President Washington Signs a Land Patent
for “The Hero of Saratoga,” Conway Cabal Plotter
Major General Horatio Gates (SOLD)

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Document Signed as President, Philadelphia, Pa., September 17, 1796. Countersigned by Secretary of State Timothy Pickering; with September 15, 1796 Endorsement Signed by Secretary of War James McHenry on verso. Engraved broadside on vellum, being a patent for Virginia Line land awarded to Major General Horatio Gates. With embossed paper seal of the United States. 14¾ in. x 12⅜ in.

   More...

Gates is rewarded for his military service, the highlight of which was his leading America's Northern Army to defeat British general John Burgoyne at the Battle of Saratoga in October, 1777. The victory turned the Revolutionary War in favor of the Americans, and convinced France to enter the war on the side of the United States.

Signed by the president during the last full year of his second term in office, this land patent brings Washington together with one of his most famous Revolutionary War rivals. Washington, who believed Gates had plotted to usurp his command as part of the 1777-1778 Conway Cabal, later characterized the general as having “an air of design, a want of candor…and even of politeness,” complaining that “this Gentleman does not scruple to take the most unfair advantages of me.”[1]

Item #23197, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Rhode Island Printing of George Washington’s Will -
Freeing His Slaves Upon the Death of Martha

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Pair of Newspapers. “Interesting Extracts from the WILL of Gen. George Washington,” United States Chronicle, Providence, R.I., February 20 and 27, 1800. Each 4 pp. Washington’s will begins on p. 2 of the February 20 issue and concludes on p. 1 of the February 27 issue.

   More...

Item #22858, $1,250

13 pamphlets on George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, New York History, etc., Collected by Grant’s Secretary of State Hamilton Fish

[HAMILTON FISH], Signed Book, 13 separately printed pamphlets bound together, dates ranging from 1799 – 1828, Approx. 423 pp. Handwritten table of contents glued in, signed by Fish on free front endpaper and in 2 other places.

   More...

Item #22157, $3,400

Washington’s Whiskey Rebellion Proclamation

[GEORGE WASHGINGTON], Newspaper. The New York Journal & Patriotic Register, New York, N.Y., September 29, 1792. Signed in type by both Geo. Washington and Th. Jefferson. 4 pp., disbound.

   More...

Item #22707, $900

One Day Before Marching to Yorktown,
Washington Adds Troops in Virginia (SOLD)

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Letter Signed, to George Weedon. “Head Quarters” [Williamsburg, Va.], September 27, 1781. 1 p., 11½ x 7½ in. Text in David Humphreys’s hand. Washington’s signature is fine, but the text of the letter is significantly faded and priced accordingly.

   More...

After the Comte de Grasse’s fleet arrives in Virginia, Washington requests troops to aid the combined militia and French force during the Siege of Yorktown. Washington and Virginia militia Brigadier General George Weedon had been corresponding for several weeks regarding the arrival of the Duc de Lauzun’s legion in Virginia, and Washington’s concerns that Weedon pay the Frenchman the respect appropriate to his rank.

Item #22783.01, SOLD — please inquire about other items

A Week Before Yorktown, Washington Builds Up the Virginia Militia and Reminds Its Commander to Mind His Manners

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Letter Signed, to George Weedon. Williamsburg, Va., September 23, 1781. 2 pp., 6 3/8 x 8 1/8 in. In John Trumbull’s hand.

   More...

Washington orders Virginia militia Brigadier General George Weedon to monitor the British and despite lacking supplies, prevent them from foraging the countryside when possible. The Commander in Chief then informs Weedon that French reinforcements are due to arrive and to show their commander the respect he deserves.

Item #22782.01, $40,000

George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Autograph Letter Signed, to Major James McHenry, Newburgh, NY, August 15, 1782.

   More...

“…in March last, I committed a matter to your care of which you took no notice till July…. Do not my dear Doctor tease your Mistress in this manner ”

In this highly personal letter, Washington offers a glimpse of the man behind the otherwise stolid image. After victory at Yorktown, Americans were awaiting news of a final peace treaty from Paris. Washington remained head of the Continental Army, and warily watched British General Sir Henry Clinton’s army in New York City. For all its friendly tone and nebulous phrases, Washington and McHenry are actually discussing the very serious business of funding and maintaining troop levels to discourage future British actions.

Item #20987.99, $98,000

Washington Crossing the Delaware (SOLD)

[EMANUEL GOTTLIEB LEUTZE], Engraving. Washington Crossing the Delaware, by Paul Girardet after Leutze’s painting. New York, N.Y., Goupil & Co., 1853. Mezzotint and line engraving on India paper, mounted as issued to a larger sheet of engraving paper, printed caption, “Subscriber’s copy,” numbered “50.” 38¼ x 22¼ in., framed 51 x 38½ in.

   More...

Item #21086, SOLD — please inquire about other items
Page of 3 (56 items) — show per page
Next »