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A Naval Physician Describes Tension
Between Lincoln and Admiral Goldsborough

A. S. HEATH. [CIVIL WAR], Autograph Letter Signed, to his wife. 4 pp., 7½ x 9¾ in., “U.S. Steamer Daylight, Beaufort Harbor,” Beaufort, [North Carolina], May 23, 1862.

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“the President [Lincoln] gives old [Admiral] Goldsborough fits, threatening to cashier him &c &c.  Good for the President. Had he known what I have, about him (G) he would have come to the same conclusion six months ago.”

Item #22958, $500

Burr Orders Interesting Political Books from His Law Partner

AARON BURR, Autograph Letter Signed, to William Ireson. Albany, N.Y., July 20, 1791.

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Item #21480.04, $1,500

Request for Return of Drury’s Men to the General Court Committee Probably Signed by a Lexington-Concord Minuteman

AARON CHAMBERLAIN, Autograph Letter Signed (Aaron Chamberlin), Boston, 29 June 1782, 1 p., to Col. Drury (in Grafton). For “the Three Months that were raisd by Virtue of a Resolve of the 16 of June 1781”.

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Item #20639.15, $400

Defending New York in 1776 - Entrenching Tools

ABRAHAM BRINCKERHOFF, Autograph Document Signed. March 16, 1776. 2 pp. A detailed account of various tools delivered and returned for the purposes of constructing defenses around New York City in the spring of 1776. Colonel Abraham Brinckerhoff, “quartermaster of the 2nd battallion” is the officer in charge of supplying the tools. This account records the names of captains on the day’s fatigue duty together with the tools they took for the day’s work including “Pick Axes”, “Shod Shovels,” “Spades,” “Iron Shovels,” and “Axes.” Captains include Jacob Chase, Patrick Birmingham, and others.

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Item #21007.64, $1,950

New Jersey’s, “Poor Man’s Counselor” Dockets a Judgment

ABRAHAM CLARK, Document Signed. Judgment in a civil suit. Docketed by Clark on verso. 1 p., 7½ x 5½ in. Lacking 1/4 of leaf and manuscript, edge chipping.

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Item #22991.04, $2,500

A New Jersey Signer Approves a Land Survey

ABRAHAM CLARK, Manuscript Document Signed as a member of the Committee of Elizabethtown Purchase, co-signed by the surveyor and six other committee members, Elizabethtown, New Jersey, October 13, 1783, 1 p. 8⅞ x 14⅝ in.

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The members of the Committee of Elizabethtown attest to the return of a survey by William Coles for a tract of land on the south side of the First Mountain.

Item #22076.99, $3,400

Abraham De Peyster Conveys Property on Broadway
to Mary Van Cortlandt

ABRAHAM DE PEYSTER (d. 1767), Document Signed (“A:D: Peyster”). New York, New York, January 14, 1757.

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The children of Abraham De Peyster convey a lot, with “tenement,” on the east side of Broadway above New Street (in the middle of todays financial district) to Mary Van Cortlandt, their late nephew’s wife. The family patriarch’s will specified that his extensive property holdings in New York City be divided equally among his children. The lot cited here had been Catharine (née De Peyster) Cortlandt’s share of her father’s estate. When Catharine died, her share was inherited by her son, Stephen van Cortlandt. In turn, when he died in 1756, it became the property of his widow, Mary Walton Ricketts van Cortlandt. (Witness Jacob Walton is likely a relative.)

Item #20053, $3,600

Lincoln Sues a Bridge Contractor for Payment

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Document Signed. Legal Brief. [Springfield, Ill., April 16, 1839]. 1 p., 7 5/8 x 12 5/8 in.

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Item #22878, $14,000

Pro-Lincoln Reelection Broadside

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Pro Lincoln 1864 Campaign Broadside. 1864. 1 p., 10 1/8 x 13 1/8 in.

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Item #23110, $600

As Congress Finally Considers an Anti-Slavery Amendment, Lincoln Decides That Sending a Presidential Message to Congress Would Not Help the Cause

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Endorsement Signed as President, to John D. Defrees, Washington, D.C., February 8, 1864. On verso of an excellent content Autograph Letter Signed by Defrees, February 7, 1864.

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Item #23199, $55,000

Abraham Lincoln Mourning Stereoview

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Photograph. Lincoln funerary stereoview. c. April 1865, E.F. Smith photographer, Boston, Mass.

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Item #22051, $275

A First-Day New York Printing of Candidate Lincoln’s
Cooper Union Speech (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Newspaper. New York Evening Post, New York, N.Y., February 28, 1860, 4 pp., 26 x 30½ in. Disbound. Lincoln’s speech is printed on the front page and continued on page 4. With British Museum stamp next to masthead.

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“Let us have faith that right makes might.”

Item #22803, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Congressional Copy of The 13th Amendment
Signed by Abraham Lincoln (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Document Signed (“Abraham Lincoln”) as President, [Washington, D.C., ca. February 1, 1865]. Co-signed by Hannibal Hamlin as Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate, Schuyler Colfax as Speaker of the House, 37 of the 38 senators and 114 of the 119 Congressmen who voted for it. One of six or seven known “Congressional” copies of the Thirteenth Amendment signed by Lincoln and members of the Senate and House who voted in favor of the resolution [and one of thirteen or fourteen known copies signed by Lincoln]. 1 page, 20 5/8 x 15 3/8”, engrossed on lined vellum.

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“Neither Slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States…”

Item #21902, SOLD — please inquire about other items

A New York Newspaper Prints Lincoln’s
Cooper Union Speech on the Front Page

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Newspaper. New York Semi-Weekly Tribune, New York, N.Y., February 28, 1860, 8 pp., disbound. The complete text of Lincoln’s speech is printed under the headline: “NATIONAL POLITICS, A Speech, Delivered at the Cooper Institute Last Evening, by, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, of Illinois.”

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“Let us have faith that right makes might.”

Item #22847, $9,500

Unrecorded Broadside of Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Broadside, “Inauguration of President Lincoln, March 4th, 1865.” [ca. March 4, 1865]. 10 7/8 x 13½ in.

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“With malice toward none, with charity for all”

Item #22093, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Last Formal Photograph of Lincoln, with Son “Tad”

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Albumen Photograph by Bouve, Boston, Mass., February 5, 1865, image 6 ¼ x 8 ½ in., mounted on original board, 8 x 10 in.

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In this albumen print, Lincoln’s youngest son Thomas is erroneously called “Thaddeus,” because of nickname “Tad.” An unfinished Washington Monument rises in the background, perhaps referencing the funerary monument motif of a broken column as symbolic of a life cut short.

Item #22350, $3,750

Presidential Candidate Abraham Lincoln Thanks a Supporter for Chicago News, with Republican Convention Materials (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, to P.A. Hackleman. Springfield, Ill., June 8, 1860. 1 p. 5 x 8 in. With a 5 ½ x 3 in. envelope postmarked “Rushville Ills. June 13” and “Springfield, Ill.” With: A pair of exceedingly rare broadsides from the Chicago convention that nominated Lincoln for the Presidency.

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In June 1860, Lincoln had only recently gained the nomination as Republican Presidential candidate. A month earlier, he had been locked in a tight battle with heavy favorite William Seward. Lincoln’s surrogates packed the Chicago Republican convention hall with supporters and enlisted the help of a local newspaper editor to secure the votes of the Ohio delegation. After a raucous debate and inside dealings worthy of Chicago’s political reputation, Lincoln won the nominated on the third ballot.

Item #22613; 22557.01-.02, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Broadsheet of Lincoln’s 1862 State of the Union Message

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Broadsheet, “Sentinel Extra” [place unknown[1]], ca. December 2, 1862, 9⅛ x 24 in. 2 pp.

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We cannot escape history… In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free… We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best, hope of earth...”

One month before signing the Emancipation Proclamation, the president proposes colonization and his plan for compensated emancipation, discusses foreign affairs, reports on progress of the Pacific Railroad, the war and finance. This rare “Sentinel Extra” broadsheet (apparently unrecorded in OCLC) has other news of the day on the verso, including a fantastic article quoting General Meagher’s reaction to the resignation of several officers after McClellan was removed.

Item #22179, $6,500

Three Weeks after Gettysburg,
Lincoln Calls For More Pennsylvania Troops (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Partly Printed Document Signed as President, July 24, 1863, Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C., 1 p., 7¾ x 9¾ in.

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Lincoln’s 1863 draft order for the 18th District of Pennsylvania. This was one of the first draft calls ever signed, and was executed about two weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, and one week after the New York Draft Riots.

Item #22532, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Famous Mrs. Bixby Letter:
Consoling the Mother of Five Sons Killed in the War

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Newspaper. New York World, New York, N.Y., November 26, 1864. 8 pp. Lincoln’s letter appears on page 1, column 4.

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A front-page printing of President Lincoln’s famous letter to Mrs. Bixby, on her family’s sacrifice for the Republic.

Item #22507, $1,000
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