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Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln

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The Emancipation Proclamation, Gen. Orders No. 1, First Edition of First War Department Printing, Bound with First Editions of Gen. Orders 2-201, Jan. to June 1863

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Printed Document. Emancipation Proclamation. Signed in type by Lincoln, Secretary of State William H. Seward, and Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas. General Order No. 1, War Department, Adjutant General’s Office, Washington January 2, 1863, 3pp., intended for all military commanders in the field. Dated in print January 2, but, consistent with the time it normally took for military orders to be published, it likely came out closer to January 7. Earlier separate printings are very seldom available. (Eberstadt: Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation # 12.)

Bound together for Army paymaster Major N.S. Brinton with a 26-page handwritten subject index followed by separately printed and paginated orders from Jan. 1 to June 30, 1863. Brinton or a clerk apparently wrote the index as the orders were received. Since a printed index would have been available soon after the last order, it was likely bound in 1863. This sammelband also contains General Orders Affecting the Volunteer Force, Adjutant General’s Office, 1862. Washington: Government Printing office, [ca. March] 1863, with printed subject index, pp I – LVI, and pages 1-158.

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“All persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free.”

Also Bound with an 1863 Compilation of General Orders Affecting the Volunteer Force… for Jan. to June 1862, including the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Item #23692, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, to John Hickman. Springfield, Ill., July 29, 1860. 1 p., 4½ x 7 in. With original envelope addressed to Hickman in Lincoln’s hand, with “Free” and “Springfield, IL July 30” postmark. [Lincoln didn’t have the franking privilege at the time, but it was free to send mail to members of Congress.]

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John Hickman, a pro-slavery Pennsylvania Democrat, became fervently anti-slavery over Buchanan’s moves to expand slavery into Kansas. Hickman migrated into the “anti-Lecompton” wing of the Democratic party, then towards the Know Nothings, and finally becoming a founder of the Republican Party. In the May 1860 Wigwam convention that chose Lincoln as the Republican Presidential nominee, Hickman was a candidate for the vice presidency; he came in third, after Hannibal Hamlin and Cassius Clay.

At a July 24, 1860, Philadelphia rally, with the nominees in place, Congressman Hickman made his case in support of Lincoln and Hamlin against the “extravagant and unconstitutional demands” of the South regarding the expansion of slavery. “We can only make it effectual in one way—by the support of Mr. LINCOLN. He is honest and capable, and attached to the principles of the Constitution, and his election will assign limits to sectional oligarchy, and make labor honorable and remunerative....” Less than a week later, Lincoln received a copy of the speech from Hickman and thanked him with this brief letter. Clearly, the battle lines of the watershed election of 1860 had been drawn.

A significant portion of Hickman’s speech was soon printed in pamphlet form attached to Lincoln’s already famous Cooper Union speech. Titled The Republican party vindicated--the demands of the South explained : Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, at the Cooper Institute, New York City, February 27, 1860. The pamphlet adds to Lincoln long excerpts from Hickman’s speech, pieces arguing against the Democratic candidate Stephen Douglas (“The Dred Scott Decision and Douglas’ Endorsement Thereof,” and “Practical Operation of Douglas’ ‘Non-Intervention.’”), and his running mate (“Herschel V. Johnson’s Views”).

To accompany our letter, we include a first edition of the pamphlet (#24290.03).  A digital copy of the whole pamphlet can also be seen:  https://archive.org/details/republicanparty00linc

Item #23781, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Compensated Emancipation Proposal

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, Pa., March 7, 1862. 8 pp., 15½ x 20½ in. With “Message from the President...Resolved, That the United States ought to co-operate with any State which may adopt gradual abolition of slavery.” [Printing Lincoln’s March 5 message to Congress on page 1.]

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The United States is the only nation in history to end slavery through Civil War. Nations as diverse as Russia, the British Empire, France, Brazil, and others around the world ended their reliance on slave labor through legislative means that included some form of compensation to slave owners for their lost “assets.” Here, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports on the front page that Lincoln presented a special message to Congress with a plan to end slavery through compensation. There would be no takers among the slaveholding border states.

Item #30001.28, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address and the 13th Amendment Ratified (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. The Tribune Almanac and Political Register for 1866, New York, N.Y., The Tribune Association, 1865. 96pp., 5 x 7½ in.

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Item #30007.002, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln Orders a National Day of Thanksgiving in Honor of the Union Victory at Gettysburg

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. [THANKSGIVING], Broadside. Proclamation of Thanksgiving. Massachusetts, [probably Boston], ca. July 27-August 6, 1863. 1 p., 20 x 28 in.

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Lincoln’s first call for a national day of Thanksgiving.

Item #23584, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Republican “Wide Awakes” Determine to Resist the Expansion of Slavery “by all constitutional means.” (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Manuscript Document. Constitutions and minutes from five manifestations of the Woonsocket, Rhode Island, Republican Party organization. Woonsocket, R.I., 1856 – 1864. Including the 1860 “Wide Awakes.” 121 pp. (nearly half blank), 8 x 11 in.

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An anti-slavery Republican Party campaign record ledger from Woonsocket, Rhode Island, 1856 to 1864, including the handwritten “Wide Awakes” constitution and minutes from the 1860 election.

Item #22220, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Former Home, and Lee’s Surrender (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 20, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Item #H-5-20-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Funeral Procession in New York City

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 13, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Item #H-5-13-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Assassination

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, April 29, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Item #H-4-29-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items

President Lincoln Commissions General Grant

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, March 26, 1864. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Death of Colonel Ulric Dahlgren. Ulysses S. Grant receiving his commission as lieutenant general from President Lincoln. Centerfold: General Custer’s late movement across the Rapidan. Mobile, Alabama.

Item #H-3-26-1864, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Inauguration of President Lincoln (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, March 16, 1861. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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“touched...by the better angels of our nature...”

Item #H-3-16-1861, SOLD — please inquire about other items

A First-Day New York Printing of Candidate Lincoln’s
Cooper Union Speech (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Newspaper. New York Evening Post, New York, N.Y., February 28, 1860, 4 pp., 26 x 30½ in. Disbound. Lincoln’s speech is printed on the front page and continued on page 4. With British Museum stamp next to masthead.

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“Let us have faith that right makes might.”

Item #22803, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Pardoning a Murderous Mutineer (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Document Signed, as President, countersigned by Secretary of State William H. Seward, Washington, D.C., May 10, 1864. 2 pp. 10¾ x 16¾”.

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Lincoln pardons Alfred Ryder, a prisoner in New York’s Sing Sing prison. Ryder promptly enlisted in the Union navy, only to desert a year after the war ended.

Item #13446, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln Commission of William D. Porter
as Commodore in the Navy (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Partially Printed Document Signed as President, co-signed by Gideon Welles as Secretary of the Navy and William Pelloran. Washington, D.C., January 26, 1863. 1 p., 16¼ x 18½ in., on vellum.

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The third brother of a famous naval family receives his Civil War commission from Lincoln.

Item #22833, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Lincoln Nomination Chair (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Chair, bentwood hickory; painted black. [Springfield, Illinois?, ca. 1860].

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Item #22294, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Reporting Lincoln’s Journey to Washington
for His Inauguration

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Times, New York, N.Y., February 23, 1861. 8 pp.

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Item #30000.79, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address, Appealing to the “Better Angels of Our Nature” (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Semi-Weekly Tribune, New York, N.Y., March 5, 1861. Lincoln’s inaugural address, given the day before, is printed on the front page. With other substantial content about the inaugural ceremonies and the swearing in, including Roger Taney’s disposition right after he swore in Abraham Lincoln: “The Chief Justice seemed very much agitated...” . 8 pp., 16 x 21½ in.

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“One section of our country believes slavery is right and ought to be extended, while the other believes it is wrong and ought not to be extended. This is the only substantial dispute.... I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

Item #22864, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation
and Pivotal Battle of Antietam (SOLD)

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, October 4, 1862. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Contains a Thomas Nast illustration: “McClellan Entering Frederick, Maryland” on the front page. Inside: The Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, September 22, 1862. View of Harpers Ferry and Maryland Heights. War map of Kentucky. Capitol grounds at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania turned into a camp. Centerfold: Battle of Antietam. Grand depot for General Grant’s army at Columbus, Kentucky.

Item #22505, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Reporting the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation
and the Union Victory That Precipitated It (SOLD)

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, New York, N.Y., October 11, 1862. 16 pp., 11 x 16 in.

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Reporting the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest day in American history, and the occasion for Lincoln to issue his preliminary Emancipation Proclamation warning the South to return to the Union or face losing their slaves.

Item #22501.41, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Congressional Copy of The 13th Amendment
Signed by Abraham Lincoln (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Document Signed (“Abraham Lincoln”) as President, [Washington, D.C., ca. February 1, 1865]. Co-signed by Hannibal Hamlin as Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate, Schuyler Colfax as Speaker of the House, 37 of the 38 senators and 114 of the 119 Congressmen who voted for it. One of six or seven known “Congressional” copies of the Thirteenth Amendment signed by Lincoln and members of the Senate and House who voted in favor of the resolution [and one of thirteen or fourteen known copies signed by Lincoln]. 1 page, 20 5/8 x 15 3/8”, engrossed on lined vellum.

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“Neither Slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States…”

Item #21902, SOLD — please inquire about other items
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