Seth Kaller, Inc.

Inspired by History


Browse by Category

Abraham Lincoln

African American History

Albert Einstein

Alexander Hamilton - Individual Documents

Alexander Hamilton - The Alexander Hamilton Collec

America's Founding Documents

Books

Civil War and Reconstruction

Declaration of Independence

Early Republic (1784 - c.1830)

Finance, Stocks, and Bonds

George Washington

Gettysburg

Gilded Age (1876 - c.1900)

Great Gifts

Israel and Judaica

Maps

Pennsylvania

Presidents and Elections

Prints

Revolution and Founding Fathers (1765 - 1784)

Science, Technology, and Transportation

War of 1812

Women's History and First Ladies

World War I and II

African American History
African American History

Sort by:
« Back
Page of 3 (56 items) — show per page
Next »

Calling for More Black Troops in the Union Army: Criticizing NY for Turning Away African American Soldiers and Praising a Tennessee Regiment

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside. New England Loyal Publication Society No. 143. Boston, Mass., December 2, 1863. 1 p., 9½ x 15 in.

   More...

“These volunteers who were not permitted to volunteer happened to have black skins, and for that reason they were refused. Is it not almost time to have done with this absurd superstition, this fanatical folly?”

Item #23625, $950

Discontent with Gilded Age Presidential Politics
and the Influence of “the negro vote”

WILLIAM BEACH LAWRENCE, Autograph Letter Signed, to Henry Anthony. Newport [R.I.], November 25, 1872. 4 pp.

   More...

A detailed, despairing letter on campaign politics after the reelection of Ulysses S. Grant. Lawrence observes the humiliating defeat of Democrats and “Liberal Republicans” – who united behind Horace Greeley because of corruption in the Grant administration – in the Election of 1872. Lawrence laments the elevation of personality over merit and virtue in elections, an observation which resonates today. He also expresses concern about how newly enfranchised African Americans tended to vote.  “The negroes are naturally disposed to support those who are in power & whom they invest with superior dignity, on account of the possession of power. …the extraordinary denouement of the Cincinnati Convention has placed in bold relief the mode most unsatisfactory to an intelligent people, by which party conventions are constituted & which are readily made, the instruments of the vilest partisan combinations, carried on by men without character & without principle.

Item #20020, $950

1764 New York Bill of Sale for 20-year old Caesar

[NEW YORK SLAVERY], Manuscript Document Signed by Theodorus VanWyck, Theodorus VanWyck, Jr., and Thomas Langdon [Jr.], March 5, 1764, Dutchess Co., NY, wherein Theodorus and William VanWyck, executors of the Last Will & Testament of Thomas Langdon, Sr., deceased, sell to Joseph Horton “one Negro Boy Named Ceesar [sic] aged Twenty years,” for “one Hundred and Twenty pounds Current Money of New York.” 1 p. 7 1/4 x 11 7/8 in.

   More...

Item #21947, $950

Boston Congregational Society Sermons

THEODORE PARKER, Signed Book. Two sermons preached before the Twenty-Eighth Congregational Society in Boston...On leaving old and entering new place of worship. Boston: 1853. 1st ed. 8vo. 56pp. Inscribed by Parker.

   More...

Item #21288, $950

New Hampshire Ridicules South Carolina’s Attempts
to Game the System After Rejecting the 14th Amendment

[AFRICAN AMERICAN], Broadside. “Part of a Speech of the N. H. “Champion of Democracy” on the Negro Question,” no place, [New Hampshire], c. 1867. 1 p., 9½ x 13½ in.

   More...

Item #22840, $1,000

Anti-Slavery Broadside: “Comparison of Products, Population, and Resources of the Free And Slave States”

[ANTI-SLAVERY], Broadside, “Comparison of Products, Population, and Resources of the Free And Slave States.” 1861. 14.25 x 22 in., multi-colored, by John Batchelder, printed by Welch, Bigelow, and Co., Cambridge, Mass.

   More...

This chart compares free and slave state output in such areas as the number of schools, newspapers and periodicals, population, slave population, literacy rates, manufacturing, and agricultural output.

Item #22049.02, $1,100

A Texan Keeps His Slaves by
Making Them Indentured Servants

[SLAVERY], Manuscript Document Signed. Agreement to Indenture Eighteen Negroes to James Cox of Texas. [Austin, Texas?]. May 10, 1832. 4 pp., 8 x 13½ in. Lacking the first leaf.

   More...

A creative legal strategy allows this American colonist to Mexican Texas to retain his slaves despite Mexican law.

Item #23309, $1,150
Image
Not
Available

Three Slave Sale Documents from Louisiana, 1846-1857, Including Some across State Lines

[LOUISIANA SLAVE SALES], Archive of 3 Partly Printed Documents accomplished in Manuscript, 1846 to 1857, Louisiana, each signed by government official with embossed seals. 8 pp. total plus dockets.

   More...

Archive of three official court papers from New Orleans and St. Landry, Louisiana, dealing with the sales of 5 slaves, using the same form as the sale of real estate.  One of the sales transfers slaves from Virginia.

Item #21949, $1,150

Responding to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Invalidation of Anti-Discrimination Laws, a New Jersey Congressman Unsuccessfully Attempts to Ensure Civil Rights at the Start of the Jim Crow Era

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. JOHN HILL, Broadside. Assembly No 13., State of New Jersey. An Act to Prevent Discrimination against Any Person on Account of his Race, Creed or Color. Large folio sheet, with numbered lines, printed for the use of the legislature. [New Jersey], Introduced January 9, 1883.

   More...

“Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, That no person shall be denied the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities and privileges of all hotels, inns, taverns, restaurants, public conveyances on land or water, theatres and places of public resort or amusement, because of race, creed or color…”

Item #24742, $1,250

Unusual Oyster Bay NY Slave Manumission

[SLAVERY], Manuscript Document Signed. New York, N.Y., May 21, 1813. 1 p., 8 x 9½ in.

   More...

Samuel Young and Zebulon Frost, “Overseers of the Poor of Oysterbay” certify that a slave named Lizzie is freed.

Item #23621, ON HOLD

Horace Greeley on Publication of a Letter
by Abolitionist Cassius Clay

HORACE GREELEY, Autograph Letter Signed in full and with initials, to Ephraim George Squier [ed. of Hartford Whig Daily Journal], New York, March 26, 1844. 1 p.

   More...

Noted abolitionist Cassius Clay wrote a letter that supported his slaveholding cousin Henry Clay’s run for the presidency while simultaneously attacking the foundations of slavery and its entrenchment in American political life. Horace Greeley, editor of the New York Tribune, writes to a Hartford newspaper editor asking him to take care that every Abolitionist reads this letter this week.”

Item #20729, $1,250

A Copperhead Newspaper Prints, Then Criticizes,
the Emancipation Proclamation

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, Newspaper. New York Journal of Commerce. New York, N.Y., January 3, 1863. 4 pp., 24 x 32½ in.

   More...

An early report of the Emancipation Proclamation, where the editors describe Lincoln’s bold move as “a farce coming in after a long tragedy....Most of the people regard it as a very foolish piece of business.”

Item #22448.01, $1,450

The 1858 Debates that Propelled Lincoln to National Attention

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. Political Debates Between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, in the Celebrated Campaign of 1858, in Illinois. Columbus, Ohio: Follett, Foster, and Co., 1860. 3rd edition, with publisher’s advertisements bound in. 268 pp., 6½ x 9½ in.

   More...

Item #22476, $1,500

John Brown, Jr.’s Copy of the
“The Legislative Guide … Rules for Conducting Business in Congress; Jefferson’s Manual; and The Citizens’ Manual...”

[JOHN BROWN, JR.], Signed Book, The Legislative Guide, Containing All the Rules for Conducting Business in Congress; Jefferson’s Manual [of Parliamentary Practice]; and The Citizens’ Manual..., Philadelphia, Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1852, 317 pp., 5 ½ x 8 ¼ in.

   More...

Signed twice by John Brown’s oldest child, who in 1856, was elected to the Kansas territorial legislature.

Item #22126, $1,500

Col. Isaac Shepard Authorizes Recruitment
of 1st Mississippi Regt. African Descent (Former Slaves)

ISAAC SHEPHARD, Autograph Manuscript Signed. Milliken’s Bend, Louisiana, May 25, 1863. 1 p.

   More...

Special order of the colonel commanding the African Brigade authorizing new recruiting efforts in Louisiana for Bryant’s 1st Mississippi Regt. of African Descent. “Major J. E. Bryant of the 1st Reg Miss. Infantry of African descent, is hereby ordered to proceed to Grand Gulf, Haines’ Bluff, or any other locality in front where he may deem it prudent, to recruit for his Regiment…”. Shepard allows eight (white) soldiers from Sherman’s Corps to be enlisted as Lieutenants.

Item #21810, $1,750

An Overseer is Guilty of Murdering His Slave
by “Stocks, Starvation and Lashes.”

[SLAVERY], Manuscript Document Signed by George Newman, Edward T. Smith, Sheppard Taylor, Elijah Norman, Hezekiah Kibbee, David Collins, and Daniel Greenleaf. Adams County, Mississippi, December 16, 1821, 1p., 8 5/8 x 12 3/8 in.

   More...

A Mississippi inquest holds a slave overseer accountable for killing a slave.

Item #22479, $2,000

The American Museum Magazine Considers Race and Slavery, Bound Together with Congressional Proceedings
on the Bill of Rights

MATHEW CAREY, Magazine. The American Museum, or Repository of Ancient and Modern Fugitive Pieces, &c. Volume VI, July to December, 1789. 492 pp., plus 46 pp. bound in, Proceedings of Congress, from the First Session of the First Congress, including the process of amending the U.S. Constitution by adding a Bill of Rights. With ownership signature of Connecticut Revolutionary War General Jedediah Huntington on free front endpaper. Dedicated in type to George Washington. Bound in contemporary calf, binding worn, small library label on spine, some staining on title page, several pages trimmed near end, with minor loss of text, primitive drawings of soldiers on back endpaper.

   More...

Item #22660, $2,400

“Our Colored Brother” Comes Up to Bat
with the 15th Amendment

[FIFTEENTH AMENDMENT], Print. “The Great National Game” from the graphic newspaper “Punchinello.” New York, N.Y., April 23, 1870. 16 pp. 9 x 13 in.

   More...

This full-page engraving, “The Great National Game,” satirizes the recently-passed constitutional amendment granting African-American men the right to vote. The baseball motif, popularized in presidential politics, depicts a black man with stereotyped features holding a bat labeled “15th amendment” about to hit a ball stylized with the stars and stripes. The image caption heralds the arrival of African Americans to full political rights “Our colored brother: Hi Yah! Stan back dar; its dis chiles innins now.’ ”

Item #21739, $2,500

9th U.S. Colored Infantry - William Royal Civil War Archive

[U.S. COLORED TROOPS]. CAPTAIN WILLIAM ROYAL, Archive. 45 Items from 1863-1869, primarily relating to Company F of the 9th U.S. Colored Infantry, including numerous inventories, correspondence, and pay receipts. Images shown on the website are only a sample of the complete archive. Royal, a white officer (as was typical), was in command of his company as part of the Union occupation of Richmond starting on April 3, when the Confederates abandoned their capital. He remained through the regiment’s service occupying Brownsville Texas under General Sheridan after the war. Also included are Royal’s marriage certificate and Bachelor of Laws degree, and five letters to him, including a friend mourning news of Lincoln’s assassination.

   More...

Item #22249, $2,850

“Black bellied Yankees” at The Battle of Fort Blakely

FREDERICK MORTIMER CRANDAL, Autograph Letter Signed, to Julian E. Bryant. “Up the Alabama,” April 25, 1865. 4 pp.

   More...

A Union colonel, in command of the 48th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops, writes to his friend, Col. Julian E. Bryant, of the 46th Regiment of U.S.C.T., recounting his regiment’s  part in the Battle of Fort Blakely. “We have had hard marching & hard fighting. A week in trenches & a successful charge. The ‘Black bellied Yankee’ made their mark … everyone gives us credit for doing well & I think we did excellently well.My loss was not very heavy, not over thirty all told. The other Regts in my Brigade suffered much more severely on the last charge, I being held in reserve & not being under fire but a few moments, they did gallantly…

Item #21813, $3,000
« Back
Page of 3 (56 items) — show per page
Next »