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Civil War and Reconstruction

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Sherman’s Farewell to His Troops:
Copy for 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps

WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Manuscript Document Signed, secretarially, Special Field Orders No. 76. Washington, D.C. May 30, 1865. 4p. Countersigned by Horace G. H. Tarr Captain and AAA General, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps. (Hooker’s Corps) May 31, 1865.

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Captain and assistant adjutant Horace G.H. Tarr, of the 20th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, was the final signer of this brigade-level copy of Sherman’s farewell message to his troops and orders for their triumphant march, the Grand Review, through Washington, D.C. Organized at New Haven September 8, 1862, the 20th Connecticut had been attached to the 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, since it was organized by Joseph Hooker in April 1864. Prior to that, the 20th Connecticut had been part of the 12th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. Of the two units known as the 20th Army Corps., this was the second and far more successful unit, affectionately known as “Hooker’s Corps.” At the time of this order, Joseph A. Mower was the Corps commander, leading the unit in the famed Grand Review of the Armies in Washington, D.C. before disbanding in June 1865.

Item #23912, $8,500

Lincoln, Sherman, and Grant on Civil War Era Patriotic Milk Glass Vase

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN, WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, AND ULYSSES S. GRANT], Pale green patriotic milk glass vase with hand-colored transfer portraits of Lincoln, Sherman, and Grant. Height 10½ inches, covered with hand-painted designs including an eagle, American shield, unfurled flag, banner inscribed “E Pluribus Unum,” with lilacs, gold banding and Greek key motifs. No markings or indication of origin, but likely produced towards the end of the Civil Civil War. Ca. 1865.

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Item #24349, $7,500

An Oversized Photo of General Grant
Taken after Lincoln’s Assassination

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Photograph. By Frederick Gutekunst. Philadelphia, Pa., [May 1865] 15½ x 18 in., mounted on 20 x 24 in. board. Likely dated “October 1865” [perhaps the date of production] in light pencil on Gutekunst’s label on verso. Blind stamp of Chicago Historical Society, and “Chicago Historical Society dupl” in pencil on verso.

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Item #22942, $7,500

A Wet-Plate Glass Negative of Confederate Spy Belle Boyd

BELLE BOYD, Photographic Negative. Sized for a carte-de-visite, 2½ x 3¾ in. Matthew Brady’s Washington, D.C. Gallery, ca. mid-1860s. Archivally framed and secured in protective glass, 11 x 12½ in.

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Item #21501, $7,500

A Union Officer’s Commission, and Field Report from
the 17th Connecticut Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg

[CIVIL WAR – GETTYSBURG], Allen G. Brady, Autograph Manuscript, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1863. 6 pp., in pencil, an unsigned draft or retained copy.

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A field report from the Battle of Gettysburg by Major Allen G. Brady, commander of the 17th Connecticut Regiment, written on the 4th of July, 1863, the day after the battle ended in a great victory for the Union.

“We had not more than time to form before the enemy were discovered advancing rapidly upon us on our right & a full Brigade obliquely towards our left….our fire was so destructive it checked their advance the troops on our left giving way the enemy came in behind us but we still remained firmly at the stone wall until the rebels were driven back.”

Item #21808, $7,500

Mary Lincoln’s Signed Copy of The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France

MARY LINCOLN, Signed Book. “Mary Lincoln. / 1878,” in her copy of Charles Duke Yonge, The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France, 2d rev. ed. (London: Hurst and Blackett, 1877), xvi, 432 pp., 8vo. bound in tooled purple cloth boards with titled spine. A carte-de-visite portrait of Mary Lincoln has been affixed to the front free endpaper.

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she bore her accumulated miseries with a serene resignation, an intrepid fortitude, a true heroism of soul, of which the history of the world does not afford a brighter example.

Item #24759, $6,000

Army of the Potomac Surgeon’s Diary:
Antietam to Chancellorsville

[CIVIL WAR]. ROBERT ELMER, Autograph Manuscript Signed. Diary. September 26, 1862-June 11, 1863. 46 pp. 4 ½ x 3”.

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“I rode in company with the President & Staff to review the others…”

Excellent-contentdiary with daily entries, written by Assistant Surgeon Robert W. Elmer of the 23rd New Jersey Regt., covering his service from September 26, 1862 through July 1, 1863, when he was mustered out. Includes post-battle observations of the Antietam battlefield. Elmer recounts accompanying President Lincoln on his review of the Army of the Potomac on April 8, 1863, and the subsequent bloody combat experienced by General Sedgwick’s VI Corps in the Chancellorsville campaign. Elmer writes on May 3, 1863, as Sedgwick drives General Jubal Early’s skeleton force off of Marye’s Heights in the Battle of Salem Church, an important side engagement during the Battle of Chancellorsville, “The batteries of the Rebs on the hills above Fredericksburg were captured about ten oclock. Our forces then marched through the city & followed them up on the Plank road to Richmond about three miles were there was another severe engagment in which a greater number of our men were killed & wounded than previously. I was kept very busy till late in the evening dressing the wounds. Laid down at night in a field of wheat & slept like a rock till morning.

Item #21895, $5,900

1865 General Orders,
Including Many Regarding Lincoln’s Assassination

[CIVIL WAR - WAR DEPARTMENT], Book. Bound collection of separately printed General Orders from the Adjutant General’s office for 1865. Containing 168 of 175 consecutive orders, and a 94-page index at front. Bound for Major General William Scott Ketchum, with his name in gilt on the spine and his markings or wartime notes on numerous pages. 4¾ x 7 in.

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Item #22265, $5,550

Former President John Tyler Makes a Last Attempt for Peace in 1861 – Two Months Before He Voted for Virginia Secession

JOHN TYLER, Autograph Letter Signed, to James G. Berret, written from Brown’s Indian Queen Hotel (at the corner of 6th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, where twenty years earlier, he had taken the oath of office after the death of President William Henry Harrison), February 3, 1861. 1 p., 7¼ x 9¼ in.

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In January 1861, former president John Tyler issued a call for a “Peace Conference” to resolve sectional division and avert Civil War. Here, he writes to Washington D.C. Mayor James G. Berret to thank the City Council and the Willard brothers for providing the concert hall at the Willard Hotel for the meeting. The meeting convened on February 4, 1861 with 131 representatives from fourteen free and seven slave states attended, none from the deep south. Tyler made opening remarks to the audience that included six former cabinet members, nineteen ex-governors, fourteen former senators, fifty former representatives, and twelve state Supreme Court justices. But seven southern states had already seceded, and representatives were already meeting in Montgomery to form a new Confederacy.

Item #23993.01, $5,500

Broadsheet of Lincoln’s 1862 State of the Union Message

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Broadsheet, “Sentinel Extra” [place unknown[1]], ca. December 2, 1862, 9⅛ x 24 in. 2 pp.

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We cannot escape history… In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free… We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best, hope of earth...”

One month before signing the Emancipation Proclamation, the president proposes colonization and his plan for compensated emancipation, discusses foreign affairs, reports on progress of the Pacific Railroad, the war and finance. This rare “Sentinel Extra” broadsheet (apparently unrecorded in OCLC) has other news of the day on the verso, including a fantastic article quoting General Meagher’s reaction to the resignation of several officers after McClellan was removed.

Item #22179, $5,500

1862 Civil War Bulletproof Vest Broadside

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside. “Good News to the Army.” Bartlett & Munn, Agents for Manufacturers. Newbern, N.C., April 17, 1862. 1 p., 9¾ x 6 ½ in.

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A remarkable broadside advertising the sale of bulletproof vests to Union forces in North Carolina in the wake of the occupation of much of coastal North Carolina by General Ambrose Burnside’s Expeditionary Force.

Item #21777, $5,500

Key Documents Regarding South Carolina’s Attempt to Have President Buchanan Surrender Fort Sumter Without a Fight

[SOUTH CAROLINA]. [FORT SUMTER], Three copies of letters, to President James Buchanan, Senators from Seceding States, and Isaac W. Hayne. Washington, D.C., January 10, 1861, January 17, 1861, and January 23, 1861, 5 pp. total plus docketing.

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Item #24671.03, $5,500

South Carolina Governor’s Draft Proclamation Urging Civilians to Evacuate Charleston

MILLEDGE L. BONHAM, Manuscript Document Signed, Charleston, South Carolina, August 17, 1863. 4 pp. on lined blue paper, watermarked F A Gordon 1862, 8 x 12½ in.

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Whereas the convention on the 8th Jany 1862 expressed “as the sense of the people of South Carolina … that Charleston should be defended at any cost of life or property … I, Milledge L. Bonham Commander-in-chief in & over the State of South Carolina do recommend to, and enjoin upon, all good citizens the removal from Charleston, as early as practicable, of all non-combatants....

Item #24671.05, $4,500

“Separating the Loyal from the Disloyal”
in Reconstruction North Carolina

[CIVIL WAR], Archive of materials relating to the administering of loyalty oaths in North Carolina after the Civil War during presidential Reconstruction. 1865-1866.

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Item #21814, $4,500

Report of Attacks on Forts Walker and Beauregard

JUDAH P. BENJAMIN, Autograph Letter Signed as Confederate Secretary of War, to President Jefferson Davis, with Davis’s endorsement. Richmond, Va., December 30, 1861. 1 p., plus docket, 7⅝ x 8⅞ in.

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Benjamin sends his official reports on the attacks on Forts Walker and Beauregard to Jefferson Davis, to be communicated to the Confederate Congress.

Item #20084, $4,500

Georgia Militia Incorporated
into Provisional Confederate Army

LEROY POPE WALKER, Letter Signed, as Confederate Secretary of War, to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. Montgomery, Ala., March 8, 1861. On “Confederate States of America, War Department” stationery. Docketed, “Call for Southern Rights Meeting.” 2 pp., 9⅞ x 7⅞ in.

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The Confederate Secretary of War writes the governor of Georgia asking for state militia troops and new enlistees to be transferred to the Provisional Confederate Army. This so-called P.A.C.S. was authorized by act of the Confederate Congress on February 28, 1861, a week prior to this letter.  “The President, therefore, instructs me to express the hope that Your Excellency appreciating … the necessity for immediate military organization subject to the control of this Government - will tender, for the Provisional Army, the troops now in the service of your State.” The Civil War began in earnest a month later, with the Confederate capture of Fort Sumter on April 13th.

Item #21769, $4,250

First Federal Occupation of Winchester Broadside

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside, signed in type by Colonel William D. Lewis, Winchester, Virginia, April 17, 1862, 1 p. 12½ x 11 in.

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Broadside describing the first occupation of Winchester, Virginia, during the Civil War.

Item #22128, $4,200

South Carolina Secretary of State Reports to Governor on Foreign Affairs of the “Nation”

[SECESSION]. ANDREW G. MAGRATH, Autograph Letter Signed, likely retained copy, to Francis W. Pickens, Charleston, South Carolina, March 24, 1861. 4 pp., 7⅞ x 12½ in.

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in anticipation of the Convention of the Seceding States, a common necessity should induce a common obligation on these States to share with each other, the means of defence or the dangers of attack.

Item #24671.04, $4,000

Ulysses S. Grant Follows Up on African American Troops’ First Battle at Milliken’s Bend: “Drive the enemy from Richmond. Reinforce Mower all you can and send him to do it.”

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Autograph Note Signed, to Elias S. Dennis, June 13, 1863, 1 p. 7¾ x 2½ in.

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Grant was determined to take Vicksburg, and retaking the surrounding countryside in Mississippi and across the river in Louisiana were critical parts of his plan. Here, he moves around troops to further his design after an important showing by the USCT a few days earlier. In his Memoirs, Grant observed that “This was the first important engagement of the war in which colored troops were under fire,” and he praised their actions.

Item #24508, $4,000

Years Before His Raid on Harpers Ferry, John Brown Attempts to Settle Accounts

JOHN BROWN, Autograph Letter Signed, to William Beall. Springfield, Mass., May 1, 1851. 1 p., 6¾ x 7½ in.

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Some fifteen years before his ill-fated raid on Harpers Ferry, abolitionist John Brown operated an Ohio tannery and dealt in cattle, horses, and sheep. His passion for abolition grew alongside his expertise in sheep and wool, as Brown’s business travels throughout Ohio put him in the same circles as fervent abolitionists. In 1844, he began a partnership with Simon Perkins. Two years later, in 1846, Brown and Perkins moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, a progressive community deeply interest in anti-slavery campaigns. From a business perspective, Brown had hoped that by moving East, he could command higher prices for wool both at home and in Europe. Instead, Brown grew more radical while in Springfield, believing that slavery would only end through violence. In 1850, he founded the League of the Gileadites, a militant group devoted to preventing the capture of fugitive slaves. From that point on, no fugitive slaves from the Springfield area were ever returned to slavery. Unfortunately, the wool business failed, setting Brown on his fateful path as a militant abolitionist in Massachusetts, Kansas, and Virginia in the years leading to the Civil War.

Item #23273, $3,900
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