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Civil War and Reconstruction

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New York Draft Riots: “A Great Fraud”

[NEW YORK DRAFT RIOTS], Broadside. New York: Workingmen’s Democratic Republican Association, [November, 1863]. 1 p.

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Rare broadside printed four months after the New York Draft Riots, reflecting working class reaction against the politicians who misled the people into taking part in the riots. Signed in print by “A Democratic Workingman.”

Item #21788, $2,800

“Copperheads Vigorously Prosecuting Peace: Is it the Peace YOU Want?”

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside, “Copperheads Vigorously Prosecuting Peace. Is it the Peace You Want?” c. March 1863. 1 p., 15½ x 23½ in.

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Read what they say…  Abraham Lincoln has usurped power, violated the Constitution, and put in peril the liberties of the people, but Jeff. Davis has not…. The South may make war on the North, but the North must not defend itself.... They have not a word to say in behalf of the Union, and our own imperiled liberties…

The Peace Democrats, or Copperheads, were a vocal minority of Northern Democrats who opposed the Civil War and the administration of President Abraham Lincoln, and were willing to recognize an independent Confederacy. This anti-Copperhead broadside, probably printed for the 1863 Connecticut gubernatorial, turns the resolutions of the February 1863 Hartford Convention against the Copperheads.

At top, a caricature shows Copperheads attacking Lady Liberty, who is holding a Union shield. First published in Harper’s Weekly on February 28, 1863, over the title, “The Copperhead Party.—In Favor of a Vigorous Prosecution of Peace!” this cartoon came to symbolize all those who opposed the Lincoln administration’s conduct of the war.

Item #23005, $2,750

Alexander Stephens on Mismanagement of Confederate Government and Economy

ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS, Autograph Letter Signed as Confederate Vice President, Crawfordville, Ga., April 29, 1864, to James A. Seddon, Confederate Secretary of War. 8 pp (the first 4 and last 4 of what was a 16-page letter), 4½ x 7 in.

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“You can not possibly regret more sincerely or profoundly my disagreement with members of the administration upon some of the late measures of Legislation than I do myself… [The crops] should be & should have been husbanded & guarded as gold. Not a grain of corn or blade of grass should have been wasted or lost or misapplied… Many plantations have been virtually abandoned to the negroes without any suitable superintendent. Many persons still at home under the uncertainty of getting details are failing to plant their usual crops...”

Vice President Stephens writes the Secretary of War strongly voicing his objections to acts passed by the Confederate Congress and about the economic, social, and military disintegration of the Confederacy.

Item #24014, $2,750

Charles Sumner Discusses the Emerging Duty
of the United States in Promoting Human Rights &
World Peace Evoking the Declaration of Independence and Championing Louis Kossuth and his Exploits

CHARLES SUMNER, Autograph Letter Signed, Boston, October 26, 1851. 4 pp., 7 x 9 in.

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“The influence, we are now able to wield, is a sacred trust, which should be exercised firmly, discreetly, in conformity with the Laws of Nations & with an anxious eye to the peace of the world, so as always to promote the great cause of Human Rights. Our example can do much”

Item #20287, $2,750

A Confederate General Warns His Commanders
Not to Harass the Locals

[CONFEDERACY]. JOHN ECHOLS, Broadside. General Orders. Dublin [Virginia], September 5, 1864. 12 x 10 ½ in.

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Foraging during wartime often pits an army against its supporters in the civilian population. In his final month of departmental command before returning to the Army of Northern Virginia, Confederate Brigadier General John Nichols warning his soldiers not to molest citizens or their property.

Item #23271, $2,600

A Union Officer Sheds New Light
on the Battle of Fredericksburg, with Schematic Drawings

[CIVIL WAR]. EDGAR A. BURPEE, Autograph Letter Signed, to Alexander Burpee. Fredericksburg, Va., December 15, 1862, 12 pp., 5 1/8 x 7¾ in.

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Mainer Edgar Alphonso Burpee describes the Battle of Fredericksburg, providing previously-unknown details regarding order of battle, Union movement through city streets, “unbecoming” ransacking of civilian property, and Confederates shelling Union-occupied parts of their city. He also includes drawings of the city’s streets.

Item #22500, $2,600

Scarce “Third Day of the Battle of Gettysburg” Magnus Hand Colored View

[GETTYSBURG]. CHARLES MAGNUS, “Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 3rd 1863. The Third Day,” color print. New York: Charles Magnus, 1863. 23 x 17 ½ in.

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Item #24699, $2,500

Gideon Welles Announces Lincoln’s Assassination to the Navy

[GIDEON WELLES], Printed Document Signed in print as Secretary of the Navy. General Order No. 51, Navy Department. Washington, D.C. April 15, 1865. Black border, issued just hours after the president’s death. One page with integral blank, 5½ x 8½ in.

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Item #23915, $2,500

A Former Tennessee Congressman Thanks an Editor for Opposing Southern Nullifiers, and Criticizes Andrew Jackson’s Political Vindictiveness

JAMES B. REYNOLDS, Autograph Letter Signed, to Hezekiah Niles. Clarksville, Tenn., January 12, 1831. 3 pp., 9¾ x 8 in., with integral address leaf.

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Former Tennessee congressman James Reynolds thanks newspaper editor Hezekiah Niles for standing against Southern nullifiers while offering insight into the spiteful tactics Jackson used against Reynolds once elected to the presidency. Jackson won the presidency in 1828 after losing in 1824 to John Quincy Adams. Apparently, fellow Tennessean Reynolds did not complain enough about the “corrupt bargain” election of 1824—and Andrew Jackson held a grudge.

Item #22535, $2,500

Col. James Clay Rice Lobbies for Military Promotions

JAMES CLAY RICE, Autograph Letter Signed, to William Kidd, Esq., Head Quarters 44th [New York Volunteers] Camp near Falmouth, Virginia, March 14, 1863. 2pp.

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“This regiment is equal in bravery to a brigade… the boys are here who can fill [the] positions.”

Item #11625, $2,500

Recruiting a Light Cavalry Regiment in New York that Eventually Captured John Wilkes Booth

[CIVIL WAR], Printed Broadside, Sprague Light Cavalry Head-Quarters, New York, [1863]. 1 p., 12 x 14 in.

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Broadside assembled from two printed leaves, features a large hand-colored spread wing eagle with patriotic shield, calling for men to join the Sprague Light Cavalry in New York, which became part of the 16th New York Cavalry. On April 26, 1865, a detachment from the 16th New York cornered John Wilkes Booth and David Herold in a tobacco barn near Port Royal, Virginia. Herold surrendered, but Sergeant Boston Corbet, a member of the 16th New York Cavalry shot and killed Booth.

Item #24511, $2,500

Celebrating a Report of McClellan’s Death

BENJAMIN PRENTISS (1819-1901), Autograph Letter Signed (“Prentiss”) Columbus, [Kentucky], March 4, 1862. 1 p., 7¾ x 8¾ in.

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Item #20740, $2,400

Quartermaster of New York Regiment Anticipates the Assault on Fort Wagner; Mentions the 54th Massachusetts

[CIVIL WAR]. CHARLES E. WALBRIDGE, Autograph Letter Signed, to “George,” July 17, 1863, Folly Island, South Carolina. 5 pp., 7¾ x 9¾ in.

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I cannot but think constantly of the approaching battle tomorrow; just think if we get Charleston! Vicksburg is fallen, Richmond at our last accounts was seriously threatened, Lee was in chancery up in Maryland, and now if we can only take this accursed city.

Item #24474, $2,250

Print of the N.Y. 7th Regiment on Parade Drill in Washington Square, With NYU in the Background

[NEW YORK], Hand-colored lithograph, N.Y., [1852], entitled “National Guard, 7th. Regt. N.Y.S.M. / From the Original picture by Major Bötticher in the possession of the 8th. Co. N.G. / [The principal heads from Daguerreotypes – by Meade Brothers 233 Broadway N.Y. / New York, Published by Otto Bötticher, 289 Broadway].” “[O]n Stone by C. Gildemeister, 289 Broadway N.Y. / Print by Nagel & Weingaertner N.[Y.]” “Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1852 by Otto Bötticher…” 36 x 28 in. (sheet size).

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A beautifully hand-colored lithographic print showing the regiment on parade with mounted officers viewing from the left, and the public from the right. A scarce print.

Item #21671, $2,250

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin From 1852 – Year of First Publication – Presented “in 1881 by Mrs. Ann Lewis, a colored friend, as her choice treasure.”

[HARRIET BEECHER STOWE], Book. Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly. Boston: John P Jewett & Company, and Cleveland, Ohio: Jewett, Proctor & Worthington, 1852. The first edition was issued in Boston by the same publisher earlier in the same year. Its immediate success is witnessed by an addition to the imprint above the publisher’s name: “Seventieth Thousand.” Two volumes, 312 and 322 pp. respectively, both inscribed, “The Crawford’s/ Ithaca/ New York/ Presented in 1881 by Mrs. Ann Lewis, a colored friend, as her choice treasure.” With later pencil inscription, “Given to Mr & Mrs E.M. Newton by Mrs Crawford/ Sept 16 1924.

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Item #24794, $2,200

161 Young Men of Providence, R.I. Found “Loyal League” Pledged to Support the Union

[CIVIL WAR--RHODE ISLAND], Pledge and original membership roll of the Loyal League of Providence, Manuscript Document Signed, with 161 signatures, ca. January 1863, [Providence, RI]. 2 pp., 7¾ x 22¼ in.

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We, the members of the Loyal League, do hereby pledge ourselves, by words and acts, whenever practicable, to use our influence in support of the Government in all its measures for the suppression of the present unholy rebellion; and we will use our influence to discountenance and oppose all efforts in opposition to the Government and the Union.

Item #24584, $2,000

Giving South Carolina’s Governor Authority to Conduct Foreign Affairs

[SECESSION]. SOUTH CAROLINA COMMITTEE ON THE CONSTITUTION, Printed Document, “An Ordinance To amend the Constitution of the State of South Carolina, in respect to the Executive Department,” Charleston, South Carolina, [ca December 24, 1860]. 2 pp., 8¼ x 13¾ in.

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Shortly after Abraham Lincoln’s election as president in November 1860, secessionists in South Carolina demanded a convention to remove the state from the United States. South Carolina’s secession convention assembled in Columbia on December 17, 1860, but fearing an outbreak of smallpox there, they reassembled in Charleston from December 18 to January 5, 1861. On December 20, they passed a secession ordinance.

Item #24671.01, $2,000

A Huge Print of the Great Abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison

WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON, Photograph. Mammoth Plate Albumen print, approximately 15 x 19 in. Mounted on original light card board approximately 19 x 24 in. Board worn, some cracks not touching print; minor staining in image area. “William Lloyd Garrison” printed on mount inder image. c. 1870s

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An image of an older Garrison, as he appeared after his life’s work of abolition had been successfully completed.

Item #22464, $2,000

The Reform Constitution of Virginia Signed by the Man Who Warned South Carolina Governor Pickens about the Reinforcement of Fort Sumter

LITTLETON Q. WASHINGTON, Pamphlet, Constitution of Virginia, ca. 1851, signed at top in ink, “L. Q. Washington,” with pencil beneath (in another hand), “Mr. Washington Asst. Secty of State 1850-1851.” 33 pp., 5⅝ x 8⅝ in.

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After Virginia adopted the Declaration of Independence, George Mason and James Madison began drafting a state Constitution. For James Madison, helping draft his state’s Constitution would serve as a dress rehearsal for his future task of writing the U.S. Constitution. Virginia adopted its first constitution in 1776, and a major revision in 1830 loosened suffrage requirements. As more residents populated the western counties, they were underrepresented in the legislature because of continuing property requirements for voting.

The most significant changes in the 1851 Constitution included the extension of the suffrage to all white males of voting age, the creation of the office of lieutenant governor, and the election rather than appointment of judges. Because of these changes, this version has been called the Reform Constitution.

Item #22395, $2,000

South Carolina Impressment Agent Negotiates With General Beauregard for the Release of Slaves to their Masters

WILLIAM SHANNON, Autograph Letter Signed, to General Thomas Jordan. Charleston, August 17, 1863, 2 pp. With: newspaper advertisement, entitled: “Labor For Coast Defences,” a public letter from Governor M.L. Bonham, August 19, 1863, 1 p.

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Shannon, a militia colonel and state agent for the impressment of slave labor, requests the discharge of a number of slaves impressed for labor on military fortifications in Charleston, from the chief of staff of General Beauregard. Local planters depended on Shannon to force the state governor and the Confederate army to abide by the terms of the legislation granting the power to impress slave labor, in this case for a month’s time. A rare document concerning the joint effort between the Confederate government and the local planters to use slave labor for military fortifications. I am officially identified with the success of a scheme which I have labored earnestly to make efficient, outside of that motive no man can be more deeply interested than I am in the success of the defence of Charleston, but I feel constrained from a sense of duty to ask the discharge of those Negroes furnished under the call for the 15th July, who have worked over thirty days and which are relieved by the supply rendered in the past few days. The motive prompting this direct application is that I am informed by the Engineer Department that the Negroes could not be discharged…

Item #21799, $2,000
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