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Civil War and Reconstruction

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Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, as President, to Secretary of State William H. Seward, “Executive Mansion,” Washington, D.C., March 5, 1862. Signed at bottom by “William H. Seward,” with a note in an unidentified contemporary hand. 1 p. 4¾ x 7¼ in.

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The United States is the only nation in history to end slavery through Civil War. Nations as diverse as Russia, the British Empire, France, Brazil, and others around the world ended their reliance on slave labor through legislative means that included some form of compensation to slaveowners for their lost “assets.” Here, President Lincoln requests that Secretary of State William Seward summon a meeting of the Cabinet. The following day, the president presented a special message to Congress with his plan end slavery through compensation. There were no takers among the slaveholding border states. The brevity of Lincoln’s letter belies its far-reaching implications and the tantalizing possibilities of “what might have been.”

Item #23747, $90,000

Civil War General and Later U.S. Commissioner of Patents Explains Troop Delays

MORTIMER D. LEGGETT, Autograph Letter Signed as Brig Gen. to Colonel W.T. Clark, A.A.G. Canton, [Mississippi], Headquarters 3d Division 17th Army Corps, [Army of the Tennessee] February 28, 1864. An explanation on delays in troop backup.

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Item #21386.11, $375

After his Costly Victory at Shiloh, Grant Orders Hurlbut to Move towards Corinth

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Autograph Letter Signed as Commander of the Army of the Tennessee, to Stephen A. Hurlbut. “Head Quarters, Army of the Ten[nessee],” Pittsburg [Landing, Tennessee], April 29, 1862. 1 p., 7¾ x 10 in.

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While under blistering criticism for sustaining so many casualties at the Battle of Shiloh, Grant orders General Stephen Hurlbut to move his 4th division in preparation for the advance on Corinth, Mississippi. The next day, however, Halleck would relieve Grant of command of the Army of Tennessee while nominally promoting him to second-in-command of the Department of the Mississippi. Grant was left virtually powerless. While this order demonstrates Grant’s intentions, Halleck moved so slowly that the Confederate army was allowed to escape. 

Item #23516, $9,000

The Gettysburg Address – Front Page News

GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, The New York Times, November 20, 1863. (Gettysburg Address on p. 1, col. 3. Reporting on the event starts on p. 1, col. 2. Everett’s speech on pp. 2-3.) 8 pp., 15¼ x 20¾ in.

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“It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on.”

A rare first day of publication newspaper, with Lincoln’s timeless embodiment of American ideals prominently placed. This printing from November 20, the day after the Address, contains Lincoln’s speech on the front page. This original issue also includes Edward Everett’s speech and a report on the ceremonies.

Item #23318, $9,500

The Success of Black Troops At Petersburg, Virginia, Under Butler

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside. New England Loyal Publication Society No. 200. Boston, Mass., June 27, 1864. 1 p., 9 x 10¾ in.

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“They grinned and pushed on, and with a yell that told the southern chivalry their doom, [they] rolled irresistibly over and into the work.”

Item #23626, $750

Calling for More Black Troops in the Union Army: Criticizing NY for Turning Away African American Soldiers and Praising a Tennessee Regiment

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside. New England Loyal Publication Society No. 143. Boston, Mass., December 2, 1863. 1 p., 9½ x 15 in.

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“These volunteers who were not permitted to volunteer happened to have black skins, and for that reason they were refused. Is it not almost time to have done with this absurd superstition, this fanatical folly?”

Item #23625, $950

A Huge Print of the Great Abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison

WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON, Photograph. Mammoth Plate Albumen print, approximately 15 x 19 in. Mounted on original light card board approximately 19 x 24 in. Board worn, some cracks not touching print; minor staining in image area. “William Lloyd Garrison” printed on mount inder image. c. 1870s

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An image of an older Garrison, as he appeared after his life’s work of abolition had been successfully completed.

Item #22464, $2,000

Ohio Reformers Use Rhode Island’s Dorr Rebellion
to Justify Their Own Behavior

[DORR WAR], Pamphlet. The Dorr Movement in Ohio; Being an Examination into the Causes, Progress and Probable Effects of the Revolutionary Course of Locofocoism in the Organization of the General Assembly of This State, for the Session of 1848-49. [Columbus, Ohio]: Legg & Murray, Columbus, [1849]. Disbound. Inscribed in pencil on the title by H.A. Swift, the author, in presentation.

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Item #22543, $800

A Former Tennessee Congressman Thanks an Editor for Opposing Southern Nullifiers, and Criticizes Andrew Jackson’s Political Vindictiveness

JAMES B. REYNOLDS, Autograph Letter Signed, to Hezekiah Niles. Clarksville, Tenn., January 12, 1831. 3 pp., 9¾ x 8 in., with integral address leaf.

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Former Tennessee congressman James Reynolds thanks newspaper editor Hezekiah Niles for standing against Southern nullifiers while offering insight into the spiteful tactics Jackson used against Reynolds once elected to the presidency. Jackson won the presidency in 1828 after losing in 1824 to John Quincy Adams. Apparently, fellow Tennessean Reynolds did not complain enough about the “corrupt bargain” election of 1824—and Andrew Jackson held a grudge.

Item #22535, $2,500

National Thanksgiving by Thomas Nast

[HARPER’S WEEKLY], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, December 9, 1865.

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Item #H-12-9-1865, $275

Winfield Scott Criticizes Zachary Taylor’s
Illegal Order to Flog a Soldier

WINFIELD SCOTT, Autograph Document Signed, November 18, 1843, with annotations initialed by him and dated December 1843. 2 pp.

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“.... [H]earing of the illegal order & the illegal flogging, I looked into the case…”

Item #20735, $975

The “Know-Nothing” Platform Established
at the American Party’s First and Only National Convention

KNOW-NOTHING PARTY, Broadside, “Platform of the American Party, adopted by the National Convention, June 15, 1855,” signed in type by E.B. Bartlett, C.D. Deschler, and James M. Stephens, [Philadelphia, 1855]. 1 p., 10 x 13 in.

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The American Party gained strength in the 1840s and 1850s as the Whigs and the entire second party system disintegrated. The “Know Nothings” were xenophobic; and especially opposed to immigration and Roman Catholicism. The party was backed by members of secret societies such as the Order of the Star Spangled Banner and the Order of United Americans, which were dedicated to electing native-born, Protestant candidates to office. As to the existence of these secret societies, members were instructed to say “I know nothing” when questioned about their participation.

Item #22547, $2,000

Charles Sumner Discusses the Emerging Duty
of the United States in Promoting Human Rights &
World Peace Evoking the Declaration of Independence and Championing Louis Kossuth and his Exploits

CHARLES SUMNER, Autograph Letter Signed, Boston, October 26, 1851. 4 pp., 7 x 9 in.

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“The influence, we are now able to wield, is a sacred trust, which should be exercised firmly, discreetly, in conformity with the Laws of Nations & with an anxious eye to the peace of the world, so as always to promote the great cause of Human Rights. Our example can do much”

Item #20287, $2,750

Ohio Governor’s Response to
South Carolina Nullification Threat

ALLEN TRIMBLE, Printed Letter Signed, for Trimble by S.C. Andrews, private secretary to the Governor of Pennsylvania, Columbus, Ohio, February 12, 1828.

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“I herewith transmit a copy of the Preamble and Resolutions of the General Assembly of Ohio, in reply to the Resolutions from the Legislature of South Carolina, respecting the Constitutional powers of the General Government.”

Item #21057, $1,500

Blistering Border State Speech
against Wartime Confiscation of Slaves

[SLAVERY]. U.S. CONGRESS, Pamphlet. Speech of Hon. John S. Carlile, of Virginia, on the Bill to Confiscate the Property and Free the Slaves of Rebels; Delivered in the Senate …, March 11, 1862. Washington: Congressional Globe Office, 1862. 13 pp.

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Item #21856.02, $450

“Free Pass... Constitutional Purifying Association”

[COPPERHEADS], Broadside, “A FREE PASS. Entitling the holder to the tender mercies of the CONSTITUTIONAL PURIFYING ASSOCIATION, Who will guarantee to cleanse every particle of Copperheadism from our nature - so you will be able to VOTE for an honest man without prejudice...” with several illustrations depicting “THE PURIFYING PROCESS.” [1864]. 6 x 9 in.

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Item #21986.03, $400

Schuyler Colfax Holds Fast against Slavery in Kansas

U.S. CONGRESS, Pamphlet. Kansas—The Lecompton Constitution: Speech of Hon. Schuyler Colfax, of Indiana, in the House of Representatives, March 20, 1858. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, 1858. 13 pp. Colfax’s speech attacking the proslavery Lecompton constitution became the most widely requested Republican campaign document in 1858, the year marked by Abraham Lincoln’s run for the Senate against Stephen A. Douglas. First and last pages separated.

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Item #21856.04, $150

A Map of the Baruch College Area of New York City

ALEXANDER STEWART WEBB, Autograph Letter Signed “Webb,” as President of City College of New York, to General F.A. Walker. New York, N.Y. March 20, 1888. 3 pp., 8 3/8 x 13 in. With holograph map.

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Stewart sending thanks, urging General Walker to visit.

Item #22259, $1,250

“Sister Tyler” - A Rare Brady Portrait of the First Civil War Nurse & Later Administrator of Boston’s Children’s Hospital

ADELINE BLANCHARD TYLER (1805-1875), Carte de Visite, Brady New York mount, with “Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries” NY & Washington DC imprint on verso. Ca 1864.

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Item #22362, $1,950

Urging Northern Laborers to Vote Republican
and Support Worker’s Rights

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Broadsheet. The Rebellion and Its Purposes, October 6, 1862, New York, N.Y., published by The Iron Platform,. 1 p., 10 ½ x 16 ¾ in.

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“I maintain, my dear sir, that the war of rebellion is not a war of resistance against ‘Abolitionism,’ but that it is a war of resistance against Democracy.”

Item #22934, $1,350
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