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Civil War and Reconstruction

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1865 General Orders,
Including Many Regarding Lincoln’s Assassination

[CIVIL WAR - WAR DEPARTMENT], Book. Bound collection of separately printed General Orders from the Adjutant General’s office for 1865. Containing 168 of 175 consecutive orders, and a 94-page index at front. Bound for Major General William Scott Ketchum, with his name in gilt on the spine and his markings or wartime notes on numerous pages. 4¾ x 7 in.

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Item #22265, $5,550

1860’s Cartoon Critical of Andrew Johnson’s
Southern Sympathies

[ANDREW JOHNSON], Broadside, “Ho! For the Salty Styx!”. With image of Andrew Johnson piloting a boat named “Accidental President,” with text beneath “Grand Excursion of the A n d y - J o h n s o n - Cooperhead-Reb-B & B Club.” [Philadelphia], Ca. 1865. 5 x 4¼ in.

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Item #20506, $265

“Capture of Richmond and Petersburg” Ballad

[G. P. HARDWICK], Broadside Poem, Respectfully Dedicated to the Army of the Potomac. Washington, 1865. 1 p. in blue and red ink. 8 ¾ x 13⅜ in.

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“Well sing the doom and the final fall/Of the boasting chivalry, one and all:/And how Grant drove them to the wall,/ Way down in Old Virginia”

This poem and broadside celebrated the capture of Richmond and Petersburg that ultimately ended the Civil War. The poem describes how General U.S. Grant defeated General  Lee and Longstreet and also pokes fun at Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

Item #21896, $600

“Separating the Loyal from the Disloyal”
in Reconstruction North Carolina

[CIVIL WAR], Archive of materials relating to the administering of loyalty oaths in North Carolina after the Civil War during presidential Reconstruction. 1865-1866.

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Item #21814, $4,500

Order Directing a Captain to Detach
from Command of the Kearsage

GIDEON WELLES, Document Signed by Gideon Welles, November 23, 1864, 8 x 10 in., 1 p.

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An order from Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles to Captain John A. Winslow in Boston, directing that he is relieved of his command.

Item #22251, $1,750

A New York Soldier’s Affidavit Allowing
a Proxy to Vote in the 1864 Election

[CIVIL WAR], Partially Printed Document Signed by Thomas Halligan with his X mark, countersigned by John Brown, and Seneca Warren. Petersburg, Va., October 21, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 12 ½ in. With printed envelop restating affidavit’s claim on the outside, and additional affidavit of “Unregistered Soldier’s Voucher.”

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Item #21264.06, $500

A New York Soldier’s Affidavit Allowing
a Proxy to Vote in the 1864 Election

[CIVIL WAR], Partially Printed Document Signed by James M. Smith, countersigned by J.B. Parmenten, and I. H. Allen. Richmond, Va., October 18, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 12 ½ in. With printed envelop restating affidavit’s claim on the outside.

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Item #21264.05, $400

‘Rally round the Flag, Boys!’ President Lincoln Centerfold

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, October 1, 1864. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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This October, 1864 issue of Harper’s Weekly has a magnificent centerfold engraving of President Lincoln—perfect for framing—with a patriotic poem below.

Item #H 10-1-1864, $225

A Confederate General Warns His Commanders
Not to Harass the Locals

[CONFEDERACY]. JOHN ECHOLS, Broadside. General Orders. Dublin [Virginia], September 5, 1864. 12 x 10 ½ in.

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Foraging during wartime often pits an army against its supporters in the civilian population. In his final month of departmental command before returning to the Army of Northern Virginia, Confederate Brigadier General John Nichols warning his soldiers not to molest citizens or their property.

Item #23271, $2,600

The Orders that Began the Battle of Mobile Bay: Admiral Farragut’s Signal Orders Sent by Lt. John C. Kinney

[DAVID G. FARRAGUT], Manuscript Document. Orders signaled by Lt. John Kinney for Farragut aboard the U.S.S. Hartford at Mobile, Alabama, August 5, 1864. [Washington, D.C.]. 2 separate pp., 5¼ x 8¼ in. Docketed by Gideon Welles.

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Sent the morning of Battle of Mobile Bay, these orders were relayed via signal flag from Farragut’s flagship, the U.S.S. Hartford, to the captains of the U.S.S. Brooklyn, Lackawanna, and Winnebago. The correspondence records Farragut’s orders moving his fleet past the forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay. They give a blow-by-blow of the opening salvo along with the loss of the Union ironclad Tecumseh.

Item #23551, $19,500

Ledger Report by Colored Sergeant, U.S.C.T.,
“Selling Government horse & bridle...” &c.

WILLIAM BUCKNER, Manuscript Document Signed. July 18, 1864. “Report of Sergeant [William] Buckner of Co. B 46 U.S. Inf.” 2 pp. folio.

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Scarce signed colored officer’s report listing several entries, including “selling of Government horse and bridle and saddles sold.” Report also mentions barrels of whiskey. William Buckner was a sergeant in the 46th Regiment of United States Colored Troops. From April through November 1864, this regiment was stationed in the District of Vicksburg at Milliken’s Bend. Sergeant William Buckner’s African American Civil War Memorial plaque number is C-59.

Item #21800, $800

Rebel Deserters Coming within the Union Lines

[HARPER’S WEEKLY], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, July 16, 1864.

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Item #H-7-16-1864, $350

The Success of Black Troops At Petersburg, Virginia, Under Butler

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside. New England Loyal Publication Society No. 200. Boston, Mass., June 27, 1864. 1 p., 9 x 10¾ in.

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“They grinned and pushed on, and with a yell that told the southern chivalry their doom, [they] rolled irresistibly over and into the work.”

Item #23626, $750

Lincoln, the War, and Emancipation

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, June 11, 1864. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Featuring illustrations of Philadelphia Sanitary Fair Central buildings, and Generals Gouverneur Warren and Horatio Wright on the front page. “Belle Plain, Virginia General Grant’s Late Base of Supplies”; “Army of the Potomac—General Warren Rallying the Marylanders”; “President Lincoln and His Secretaries”; Centerfold: “Army of the Potomac—Struggle for the Salient, near Spottsylvania [sic], Virginia, May 12, 1864”; three illustrations of the environs of Spottsylvania [sic] Court House; “Sherman’s Advance—General Logan’s Skirmishes Advancing Toward: the Railroad at Resaca”; and “Sherman’s Advance—Position of Osterhau’s Division on Bald Hill.”

Item #H 6-11-1864, $150

Ordnance Returns from Atlanta Campaign

[CIVIL WAR], Five partly-printed documents for the 102nd New York Regiment, Companies D, E and F, dated between May 15 and September 30, 1864. The forms list inventories and expenditures of ammunition and weapons used during the Atlanta Campaign.

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Item #12510, $400

The Massacre at Fort Pillow

[HARPER’S WEEKLY], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, April 30, 1864.

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Item #H-4-30-1864, $250

Alexander Stephens on Mismanagement of Confederate Government and Economy

ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS, Autograph Letter Signed as Confederate Vice President, Crawfordville, Ga., April 29, 1864, to James A. Seddon, Confederate Secretary of War. 8 pp (the first 4 and last 4 of what was a 16-page letter), 4½ x 7 in.

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“You can not possibly regret more sincerely or profoundly my disagreement with members of the administration upon some of the late measures of Legislation than I do myself… [The crops] should be & should have been husbanded & guarded as gold. Not a grain of corn or blade of grass should have been wasted or lost or misapplied… Many plantations have been virtually abandoned to the negroes without any suitable superintendent. Many persons still at home under the uncertainty of getting details are failing to plant their usual crops...”

Vice President Stephens writes the Secretary of War strongly voicing his objections to acts passed by the Confederate Congress and about the economic, social, and military disintegration of the Confederacy.

Item #24014, $2,750

“If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag,
shoot him on the spot.”

EMANUEL LEUTZE, Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix at a public ceremony on the evening of April 23, 1864, at the close of the NY Metropolitan Fair in Aid of the U.S. Sanitary Commission. Framed. 78 ¼ in. x 68 ¼ in.

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Unique Flag Designed by Emanuel Leutze and Manufactured by Tiffany & Co. for Union Major General John A. Dix

Item #21240, $195,000

Connecticut Civil War Colonel Sketches Jacksonville, Florida Headquarters, Muses on the Fountain of Youth, Supports Freed Slaves Getting Land and Recognizes their Humanity

[CIVIL WAR]. WILLIAM H. NOBLE, Autograph Letter Signed, to his wife, [Jacksonville, Fla.], [April?] 8, 1864. 16 pp., 8 x 10 in., on 4 folding sheets stitched together.

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Just make up your mind that negro nature & human white nature are very near alike....

Every now & then it is proclaimed with great joy that Mr So & so, some northern nabob or speculator has purchased some rebel plantation & prepares to work the same. … It’s of more consequence locally & nationally, thus the negro should buy & toil as he surely will on his acre of land, than that princely men in Illinois should have inserted his loose change in a southern plantation.

Connecticut native William H. Noble, writing to his wife, responds to rumors of the fountain of youth, vilifies northerner plantation renters who continued the Southern system as new feudal barons, and calls for the redistribution of plantations to former slaves to ensure national stability. Jacksonville, Florida, was occupied and then abandoned by the Union four times. The result was a broken, skeletal city at the Civil War’s conclusion.

Noble reflects on how the African Americans’ freedom will change Southern and national life, and that regardless of race, he believed human nature was the same. Further, the former slaves needed an interest in and responsibility for their own advancement. Presaging Booker T. Washington, he thinks developing industry more important than carpetbaggers coming south offering education. With a detailed sketch of headquarters in Jacksonville, including tents, stables, and the brigade flagstaff.

Item #23878, $3,500

Future Medal of Honor Winner and Boy General Orders the 1st Vermont Cavalry to Report

EDWARD W. WHITAKER, Autograph Letter Signed, to Lt. Col. Addison W. Preston, March 26, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 10 in.

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I am directed by the Commanding General to say that you will turn over your orders to the bearer and report in camp with your command so soon as relieved.

Item #23879.03, $375
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