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William T. Sherman Talks Politics, Religion, and Princeton-Yale Football with a Suitor

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Five Autograph Letters Signed to Mrs. Mary Audenried, widow of Sherman’s former Chief of Staff. 18 pages, April 21, 1885 – February 8, 1887.

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“Rachel went to Princeton last week. Thanksgiving Day – to witness the ball play – the day was horrid and she has been under the weather ever since having taken cold.”

Sherman, during an affair with a young widow, advises her on handling her teenage daughter: “Let her play her own game…Tell her to take her own way and you choose yours. If she becomes a nun she can do no harm and is dead to the world” while criticizing the power of the Catholic Church. He also muses about his own mortality, complains that he “shall not stay long” at his Senator-brother John’s home because “there is too much politics there to suit my taste,” and relates that his daughter caught a cold at the Yale-Princeton Thanksgiving Day football game.

Item #20856, $9,000

Theodore Roosevelt Regrets He Couldn’t Convince Dark Horse Candidate Supporters to go to John Sherman at 1884 Republican National Convention

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Autograph Signed Letter to John Sherman in reference to the 1884 Republican National Convention. July 12, 1884. 2 pp. 4 ½ x 7 in. on two adjoining black-bordered sheets.

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Unlike his brother William Tecumseh Sherman, who steadfastly refused a political career, John Sherman was a lifelong public servant. Here, he attempts to gain the Republican presidential nomination for the second time.

Item #24118, $2,800

Sherman Works to Convince his Friend’s Widow (and Soon-to-be Likely Mistress) that She Just Needs Some Lovin’

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Mrs [Mary] Audenried. St. Louis, Missouri, June 9, 1884. 8 pp octavo, On Sherman’s imprinted stationery.

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Sherman trashes his wife’s devotion to the Catholic Church, discusses avoiding the great danger of being nominated to run for the presidency, and tries to convince his late chief-of-staff’s widow that she is not crazy, but simply needs a man’s company.

Item #23562.08, $6,500

Sherman’s “Insanity” For Saying 200,000 Men Would be Needed to Fight the Civil War

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to E.V. Smalley. St. Louis, Missouri, November 13, 1883. 3 pp., 5 x 8 in. On Sherman’s imprinted stationery. With an endorsement initialed by Smalley requesting the change be made if possible.

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After having recently stepped down as Commanding General of the Army, Sherman reviews a biographical article. While explaining the story of his being labeled insane in 1861 for believing that 200,000 Union troops would be needed, he asks that Secretary of War Simon Cameron’s name be left out. Smalley published his article in the Century Magazine, January 1884.

Item #23562.07, $5,000

Responding to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Invalidation of Anti-Discrimination Laws, a New Jersey Congressman Unsuccessfully Attempts to Ensure Civil Rights at the Start of the Jim Crow Era

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. JOHN HILL, Broadside. Assembly No 13., State of New Jersey. An Act to Prevent Discrimination against Any Person on Account of his Race, Creed or Color. Large folio sheet, with numbered lines, printed for the use of the legislature. [New Jersey], Introduced January 9, 1883.

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“Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, That no person shall be denied the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities and privileges of all hotels, inns, taverns, restaurants, public conveyances on land or water, theatres and places of public resort or amusement, because of race, creed or color…”

Item #24742, $1,250

Jubal Early Tracking Down a Letter

JUBAL EARLY, Autograph Letter Signed to Edward W. Bok, Lynchburg, Va., April 2, 1882, 2 pp., 4⅞ x 8 in.

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Jubal Early, the former Confederate general, informs young Edward Bok that he did not receive the document Bok sent him. He urges Bok to send it again promptly, with adequate postage to insure its successful delivery.

Item #22359.05, $1,200

Large Signed Photograph of President Chester A. Arthur

CHESTER A. ARTHUR, Signed Photo, as President, [1882], sepia, approximately 16 x 21 in., mounted on a larger-size board approximately 10½ x 24¼ in., matted and framed. Boldly signed and inscribed below the image, “To John Jameson, with sincere regard, / Chester A. Arthur.” The 3/4-length portrait shows the President standing in a heavy overcoat next to a table on which his top hat rests. The inscription is probably to John Jameson, an Amherst, Massachusetts lawyer, who was appointed postmaster in December 1876.

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Item #22260, $15,000

A Christmas Classic by Thomas Nast

[CHRISTMAS], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, New York, N.Y., December 24, 1881. 16 pp., 11¼ x 16 in.

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CAUGHT! Thomas Nast’s classic image of Santa Claus being hugged by a little girl graces the front cover of this issue of Harper’s Weekly.

The double-page centerfold is another nice Thomas Nast Christmas print, “Christmas Fancies – ‘Don’t You Wish You Wore Stockings?’,” showing children and their dog in front of a fireplace. Will Carleton’s poem, The Christmas Tree, is illustrated with art by Howard Pyle which fills nearly an entire page. Other prints include the “Electric Railway at Berlin, Prussia,” “The Ring Theatre, Vienna, Recently Destroyed by Fire,” “Hon. Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Secretary of State,” “The Late John W. Forney,” “Short and Sweet – ‘It’s Too Too Too Funny!’,”  and “The Interrupted Journey.” Thomas Nast is credited with creating the modern version of Santa Claus.

Item #H 12-24-1881, $375

Sherman on His Saddle – His One “Honest Relic” of the March to the Sea

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Colonel Herbert E. Hill. Washington, D.C., December 6, 1881. 4 pp., 5 x 7¾ in. On “Headquarters Army of the United States” stationery. Laid onto a larger sheet of paper.

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“Yesterday the Hon. S. B Bowman called …  asking the loan of “the sword or sabre I wore” during the famous March to the Sea … I explained to Mr Bowman that the truth was I did not have a sword or sabre during that march, nor at any time after I succeeded General Grant in the command of the Western Armies at Nashville March 1864.” 

Item #23562.05, $4,250

Approving Treaty Limiting Chinese Immigration - A Rarity from James Garfield’s Brief Presidency

JAMES A. GARFIELD, Partly Printed Document Signed, as President, May 9, 1881, 1 p. 8 x 10 in.

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“I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to cause the Seal of the United States to be affixed to my ratification of a treaty relating to Chinese immigration into the U.S. signed at Peking Nov. 17, 1880…”

Item #24142, $12,000

Ex-President Grant ALS re: Railroads & Building New Markets in Mexico for the U.S.

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Autograph Letter Signed, to [John P.] Jones. [Mexico City] [April 24, 1881]. 2 pp., 4½ x 6¾ in.

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After James Garfield’s election, opposing factions of the Republican Party jockeyed to have their favorite candidates appointed to Cabinet and other patronage jobs. Garfield remained unmoved about his choices, even ignoring appeals by his own vice president, Chester Arthur. While in Mexico City, Grant criticized the sitting president’s choices in a letter sent via Nevada Senator John P. Jones. Two days after receiving the letter, Garfield wrote Grant a blistering response, stating he would appoint whom he wanted. The following day, New York Senators Conkling and Platt resigned in protest and Vice President Arthur was banished from Cabinet meetings. The Grant-Garfield controversy played out in the press for months, ending only after Garfield was assassinated in July.

Item #23291, $5,000

Frederick Douglass Signed Deed

FREDERICK DOUGLASS, Document Signed as Recorder of Deeds, Washington, D.C., 1881-1886. Approx. 3½ x 8½” folded.
Image shown is a sample. To request an image of the deed currently available please email us at info@sethkaller.com

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While Douglass’s letters are scarce, documents signed during his tenure as recorder of deeds for the District of Columbia can be had very reasonably.

Item #20409u, $495

Frederick Douglass Signed Deed

FREDERICK DOUGLASS, Document Signed as recorder of deeds, Washington, D.C., 1881-1886. Approx. 3½ x 8½” folded. Sample Frame pictured.

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While Douglass’s letters are scarce, documents signed during his tenure as recorder of deeds for the District of Columbia can be had very reasonably.

Item #20409, $895

Secretary of State Evarts Accepts Invitation to Protestant Episcopal Convention: “The Bishops I think should be au gratin and the laymen chilled”

WILLIAM M. EVARTS, Autograph Letter Signed, to William A. Seaver, Washington, DC, October 15, 1880. 2 pp., 4⅞ x 8 in.

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Item #24958, $450

Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to General Henry Cist. Washington, D.C., November 7, 1879, 12 pp., 5 x 7¾ in. On “Headquarters Army of the U.S.” stationery.

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Sherman clarifies promotions of some of the Union’s most iconic generals, going back to the Civil War, and when U.S. Grant assumed the presidency and Sherman came to command the entire army.

Item #23562.04, $5,500

Civil War Hero David Dixon Porter
Expresses Support for the Chinese in a Time of Hostility

DAVID DIXON PORTER, Autograph Letter Signed, to “Reverend Dr. Newman.” Washington, D.C., March 14, 1879. 3 pp., 5 x 8 in.

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“As you and I have both expressed friendly sentiments towards the citizens of the Flowery Kingdom, we may hope to be in high favor should we live till that time.”

Item #22730, $950

“Let Us Have Faith that Right Makes Might…”

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN] SCHUYLER COLFAX, Autograph Quote Signed, from Lincoln’s Cooper Institute speech given on February 27, 1860. Sept 10, 1877.

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Schuyler Colfax, U.S. representative from Indiana and vice president under Ulysses S. Grant, pens a famous quote from Lincoln’s Cooper Institute speech.

Item #23916, $950

Mary Lincoln’s Signed Copy of The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France

MARY LINCOLN, Signed Book. “Mary Lincoln. / 1878,” in her copy of Charles Duke Yonge, The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France, 2d rev. ed. (London: Hurst and Blackett, 1877), xvi, 432 pp., 8vo. bound in tooled purple cloth boards with titled spine. A carte-de-visite portrait of Mary Lincoln has been affixed to the front free endpaper.

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she bore her accumulated miseries with a serene resignation, an intrepid fortitude, a true heroism of soul, of which the history of the world does not afford a brighter example.

Item #24759, $6,000

Opposing “the Democratic Silver Scheme”

JAMES A. GARFIELD, Manuscript Letter Signed, to Samuel B. Ruggles, Washington, D.C., August 12, 1876. 2 pp., 5 x 8¼ in.

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Representative James Garfield writes to Samuel Ruggles, a New York lawyer, Canal Commissioner, and businessman regarding monetary policy.

Item #22564.01, $1,500

Counting the Vote in 1876 – Florida’s First Election Fiasco

[FLORIDA], 12 pamphlets, broadsides, and documents relating to the disputed presidential election of 1876. 1876-1878.

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The 1876 presidential election between Republican Rutherford B. Hayes and Democrat Samuel Tilden came down to a dispute over Florida’s electoral votes. This archive of 12 pamphlets, broadsides, and documents includes official signed copies of key Florida court and executive decisions. From the papers of Edward Louden Parris, an attorney for Tilden, who ended up losing the election by way of the “Compromise of 1877.”

Item #21857.03, $2,750
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