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Presidents and Elections

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In His State of the Union Address, Thomas Jefferson Commends Lewis and Clark for Their Successful Explorations

THOMAS JEFFERSON. [LEWIS AND CLARK], Newspaper. Connecticut Courant. Hartford, Conn., December 10, 1806. 4 pp, 12½ x 20½ in.

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Item #22459, $2,000

Harry Truman Presidential Appointment to UN Agency for Palestinian Relief

HARRY S. TRUMAN, Signed Presidential appointment to a UN agency for Palestinian relief. February 21, 1952 [23”x19”]

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Item #21308.02, $2,000

Ronald Reagan — The Great Communicator — Shares His Love of Horses with a Little Girl Who Wants One

RONALD REAGAN, Autograph Letter Signed with Initials, to Carol ?, ca. 1967-1975. 2 pp., 6 x 9 in.

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Horses have been a large part of my life and I love them as much as you do…. Being a father myself I know how very much your father would like to be able to help you realize your dream but sometimes we have to wait for the good things. If it will help to know this I didn’t have a horse of my own until after I was grown up. You’ll do better than that so keep on riding & studying….

Item #24844, $2,200

Andrew Jackson Dockets a Letter on Redecorating the Hermitage, Refusing to Apologize to the French, and Bringing Home Indemnification Money Due from France to America

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Endorsement Signed with Initials, ca. June 1835. On HENRY TOLAND, Autograph Letter Signed, to Andrew Jackson, May 29, 1835. 4 pp., 7¾ x 10 in.

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“where no apology is due, you are the very last man on earth to make one…. In the present state of Exchange in this Country, I am sure that 2 to 4 % might be made out of the money instead of paying one half per Cent to Rothschilds to bring it here” (Toland to Jackson)

Item #24588.04, $2,200

Martin Van Buren & Border Troubles Between Texas Independence and the Mexican War

MARTIN VAN BUREN, Partially Printed Document Signed, as President, February 8, 1839, 1 p. 8 x 10 in.

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I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to the ratification and the ratified copy of the Convention with the Mexican Republic for the adjustment of claims of citizens of the United States. . . .

Item #23995.01, $2,500

John F. Kennedy Seeks to Set the Historical Record Straight on Munich

JOHN F. KENNEDY, Draft Typed Letter (unsigned), to the Editor of Time Magazine, June 13, 1952, with handwritten emendations. 4 pp. 8½ x 11 in, but for p. 4 which is cropped at bottom.

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Randolph S. Churchill denounces the ‘holier-than-thou’ attitude adopted by some Americans towards the English in regard to Munich and states that England ‘had no more moral or legal obligation’ to defend Czechoslovakia than had the United States.... Three days before the Munich Conference (September 26) the French received Chamberlain’s solemn pledge of absolute and immediate, as opposed to probable and eventual military action if France went to the Defense of Czechoslovakia….

That the British chose peace at this time rather than war is not, in my opinion, to their discredit, considering the poor condition of their armaments. As I stated in my book, While Why England Slept, the criticism directed against Munich could have been directed with more accuracy at Britain’s tardiness in rearming than against the pact itself…”

Item #24385, $2,500

Woodrow Wilson Protests the Sinking of Lusitania & Threatens to Break Diplomatic Relations – About a Year Before America Enters WW I

WOODROW WILSON, Signed Pamphlet. Address of the President of the United States Delivered at a Joint Session of the Two Houses of Congress, April 19, 1916.Washington, D.C., ca April 19, 1916. Bound in blue cloth boards with titled spine with several blank leaves. Spine cracked but binding intact, very minor marginal tear to title page, other pages lightly toned with a light vertical crease but clean overall. 7 pp., 5¾ x 9 in.

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Item #24100, $2,500

“Let every Federalist do his Duty,
and Massachusetts will yet be Saved!”

[WAR OF 1812], Broadside. Boston, April, 1811. Untrimmed with wide margins. At bottom, prints resolutions of a public meeting at Faneuil Hall on March 31, 1811, which threatened resistance against Congress’s May, 1810 legislation. With docketing on verso. 1 p., 11¾ x 18⅜ in.

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Fiery election broadside fanning the flames of Federalist opposition to Democratic-Republican foreign policy during the Jefferson and Madison administrations. In tone if not in substance, this jeremiad against Southern planters is not wholly different from the complaints of Southern fire-eaters against Lincoln and the “black Republicans” 50 years later. It shows the intensity of New England sectionalism a year before “Mr. Madison’s War.” “The Embargo cost you millions and millions of dollars. It sunk all the property in New England twenty per cent. It ruined and crippled thousands forever. It drove your sailors into foreign employ … You have been robbed of this treasure by Thomas Jefferson…”

Item #21861, $2,500

“Our Colored Brother” Comes Up to Bat
with the 15th Amendment

[FIFTEENTH AMENDMENT], Print. “The Great National Game” from the graphic newspaper “Punchinello.” New York, N.Y., April 23, 1870. 16 pp. 9 x 13 in.

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This full-page engraving, “The Great National Game,” satirizes the recently-passed constitutional amendment granting African-American men the right to vote. The baseball motif, popularized in presidential politics, depicts a black man with stereotyped features holding a bat labeled “15th amendment” about to hit a ball stylized with the stars and stripes. The image caption heralds the arrival of African Americans to full political rights “Our colored brother: Hi Yah! Stan back dar; its dis chiles innins now.’ ”

Item #21739, $2,500

Racist, Anti Roosevelt Drawing and Note

RACISM. [THEODORE ROOSEVELT], Drawing. 1p, 5 x 6¼ in.

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Item #22331, $2,500

Margaret Truman’s Wedding Waltz

HARRY S. TRUMAN, Typed Document Signed as former President, March 21, 1956. 1 p.

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“She lived in the White House / With her Dad and Mother / For her father was President / Better than any other…”

Item #21485, $2,500

Harding’s Return to Normalcy – and Isolationism – after World War I

WARREN G. HARDING, Typed Letter Signed as President, to Senator Joseph Medill McCormick, Washington, D. C., August 29, 1921. With autograph emendations in two different secretarial hands. 8 pp.

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Key political circular from the first-year Republican President written to influence off-year elections in New Mexico and other places. Harding justifies, and praises, the rapid postwar dismantling of America’s military by Congress, while backhandedly criticizing the inattention of his predecessor – Woodrow Wilson – to the peacetime transition. “Vast expenditure without proper consideration for results, is the inevitable fruit of war.”

Item #21124, $2,600

Franklin Roosevelt Combats Anti-Catholicism in 1928 Presidential Election

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to William H. Higgs, on “Democratic National Committee” stationery, New York, September 1, 1928. 1 p.

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It is an interesting fact that about 95% of the opposition to him in Democratic circles is due to the religious issue and not in the final analysis to prohibition or any other political issue before the American public...

Roosevelt challenges a long-time Democratic campaigner to consider whether his preference for Republican Herbert Hoover is due to a prejudice against Alfred E. Smith’s Catholicism.

Item #24491, $2,750

Herbert Hoover - Rare Signed Inaugural Address

HERBERT HOOVER, Printed Document Signed, March 4, 1929. A rare large-print copy of his inaugural address. 21 pp., 9 x 12 in.

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We have emerged from the losses of the Great War and the reconstruction following it with increased virility and strength. From this strength we have contributed to the recovery and progress of the world. What America has done has given renewed hope and courage to all who have faith in government by the people.

Item #24848, $2,750

Monroe Expands on his Doctrine in Last Annual Message

JAMES MONROE, Broadside. Albany Argus - Extra. Albany, N.Y.: Edward Croswell, December 10, 1824. 1 p., large folio broadside in 6 columns, text extracted from the National Journal, Extra, December 7, 1824. 21 ¾ x 15 ½”.

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Apparently unrecorded, this broadside extra prints President Monroe’s last annual message to Congress, delivered on December 7, 1824. Covers relations with Great Britain, the slave trade, Indian relations, the comprehensive survey of possible road and canal sites in the interior, and an elaboration on the Monroe Doctrine, providing the rationale for exhorting European states not to interfere with the evolution of the newly independent Latin American states. “Separated as we are, from Europe by the great Atlantic Ocean, we can have no concern in the wars of the European governments, nor in the causes which produce them. The balance of power between them, into whichever scale it may turn, in its various vibrations, cannot affect us. It is the interest of the United States to preserve the most friendly relations with every power, and on conditions fair, equal, and applicable to all. But in regard to our neighbours, our situation is different. It is impossible for the European governments to interfere in their concerns, especially in those alluded to, which are vital, without affecting us …

Item #30001.02, $2,750

FDR Signs Souvenir Books to Raise Money for Democratic National Committee

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Signed copy of The Democratic Book 1936. Illustrated, original presentation morocco gilt, with original illustrated wrappers bound in; copy #1531 of 2500, with limitation page signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt; cover gilt stamped “Bethlehem Steel Company Library.” 384 pp., 11 ¼ x 14 ½ x 1 ⅝ in.

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President Roosevelt signed 2,500 copies of illustration of the White House, which are bound into a souvenir book of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and sold for $250 to address a campaign deficit.

Item #24881, $3,000

JFK Photographs and Ephemera Collection

[JOHN F. KENNEDY], Archive. This amazing collection includes many original photographic prints of the Kennedy family, and an assortment of Kennedy-era White House ephemera including note cards and official funeral programs and material.

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Item #20708, $3,000

Frederick A. Aiken Urging Frémont to Run Against Lincoln

FREDERICK A. AIKEN, Autograph Letter Signed, to John C. Frémont, Washington, D.C., June 12, 1864. 2 pp. 7¾ x 9¾”.

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With the war going badly, the 1864 election is no shoo-in for the incumbent.

Frederick A. Aiken, former Secretary of the Democratic National Convention, applauds General John C. Frémont’s nomination by the Radical Republicans. He suggests that Frémont will have the blessing of the Democrats if he goes up against Lincoln for the Republican nomination. Aiken went on to serve (unsuccessfully) as defense attorney for Lincoln assassination conspirator Mary Surratt.

Item #20715, $3,200

Governor Ronald Reagan Opposes Withholding of State Income Tax

RONALD REAGAN, Autograph Letter Signed as governor of California, to Mary Boatman, June 2, 1967. 1 p. 8 x 10 in. Address penned by secretary, and then letter penned by Reagan.

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The poll this time was most interesting, particularly on 'Withholding.' This is the one area I feel it's necessary to hold out even if the poll is against me. Withholding may make it easier to pretend you aren't being taxed but it's also easier for govt. to raise taxes without getting a protest from the people....

Item #24387, $3,500

Claims that First Republican Presidential Candidate is Foreign Born & Ineligible

[STEPHEN H. BRANCH], Broadside. Important! to the Public ... The Republican Candidate for the Presidency, John C. Fremont, of Foreign Birth. Ogdensburgh, N.Y. October 31, 1856. 1 p. 10½ x 7½ in. Foxing, some paper remnants on verso.

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Item #23425, $3,500
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