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Chicago Lithograph of the Emancipation Proclamation
Click to enlarge:

A colorful Chicago pre-fire imprint of Lincoln’s historic proclamation.

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. Broadside, “National Proclamation of Emancipation.” Chicago: Rufus Blanchard. ca. 1863-64. Color lithograph, 11½ x 15½ in., on parchment-like paper.

Inventory #24989       Price: $3,750

Excerpt:

“I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States…do…Order and Declare that ALL PERSONS HELD AS SLAVES within designated States, or parts of States, are, and henceforward SHALL BE FREE, and that the Executive Government of the United States…will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons, and I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free, to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that, in all cases where allowed, they LABOR FAITHFULLY FOR REASONABLE WAGES; and I further declare and make known that such persons of suitable condition will be received into the ARMED SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES…And upon this, sincerely believed to be AN ACT OF JUSTICE WARRANTED BY THE CONSTITUTION, upon Military Necessity, I invoke the Considerate Judgment of Mankind and the Gracious Favor of Almighty God…”

Rufus Blanchard (1821-1904), one of Chicago’s foremost publishers of maps, guidebooks and globes, was a strong supporter of the Lincoln administration. In a note added at the bottom, Blanchard states that the Emancipation Proclamation “perfects the purposes of the Declaration of Independence” and would serve as “a powerful incentive to the slave to fight for the Union instead of his rebel master....”

Full text of Blanchard Note:

This Proclamation is an incalculable element of strength to the Union cause. It makes an alliance between the Rebels and Foreign States as impossible as it is for millions of Bondsmen to love Slavery better than Freedom. They loving our Government in proportion as it becomes a free land of promise and shelter from oppression, thus saving thousands of precious lives and millions of treasure from being lost in foreign wars. It perfects the purposes of the Declaration of Independence and impairs no constitutional rights, those whom it would affect having forfeited those rights by proving false to their country, to humanity and religion. No real support to the Union cause will be lost by this Proclamation, while time-serving traitors, who always covertly opposed the war, will be exposed. It will be a powerful incentive to the slave to fight for the Union instead of his rebel master, and when it becomes executed and Freedom reigns throughout the land, the colored man will leave the Northern regions, whither he has fled from slavery, and join his kindred beneath those sunny skies where nature invites him. Labor will be rewarded, justice fulfilled, and the Old Ship of State will again sail majestic o'er the unrippled waters of Liberty and Peace. Confusion and shame rest upon those who fight against a free government, and songs of thankfulness and love glorify its defenders.

                                    Rufus Blanchard, Publisher, 52 La Salle St, Chicago, Ill.

Text of Emancipation Proclamation as printed here, compared to National Archives transcript, with additions in bold and deletions struck.

By the President of the United States of America:

A Proclamation.

Emancipation Proclamation

Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, A.D. 1862 in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit:

That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be, in good faith, represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such State shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States.

Now, therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief, of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days, from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit:

Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth[)]; and which excepted parts, are for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages;

And I further declare and make known, that such persons of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution, upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind, and the gracious favor of Almighty God.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh.

By the President: ABRAHAM LINCOLN
WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Reference

Eberstadt 17.

According to Eberstadt, “The type is a conglomerate mixture of every font in the composing room. The background is tinted light green (or, in a variant, blue) with white stars, while the border of roses and oak leaves is tinted red and green. The Lincoln Memorial University Library copy is a further variant, without the stars in the background, and with the first line of text ending “issued by the” instead of “issued by the President of the”; otherwise it is the same.”


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