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Yom ha-Medinah:
Marking Israel’s Declaration of Independence—May 1948
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[ISRAEL]. Newspaper. Yom ha-Medinah. Jerusalem, May 14, 1948. 2 pp. 16 ½ x 22 in., unframed.

Inventory #23011       Price: $5,900

Excerpt

“The General Assembly of the United Nations passed a resolution authorizing the establishment of a Jewish state . . . by reason of our natural and historic right, we hereby proclaim the establishment of...the State of Israel.”

Historical Background

On May 14, 1948, “the last day of foreign rule”, the Hebrew newspapers in Palestine published a joint issue titled Yom ha-Medinah, “The Day of the State,” announcing the establishment of the State of Israel.

The front page contains the entire Israeli Declaration of Independence, signed that day by the members of the Provisional State Council, as well as an announcement that all the regulations of the British “White Paper” of 1939 are null and void.

In April, the 13-member National Administration and a National Council had voted to appoint a committee of five to draft the Declaration of Independence.  The council then voted unanimously to approve the Declaration written by the five-member commission. Israel’s National Council and representatives from a variety of other agencies met in Tel Aviv Museum Hall to sign the Declaration on their actual Independence day. By contrast, America’s Declaration was not engrossed and signed until a month after July 4, 1776. Also, the names of the 37 signers of Israel’s Declaration were immediately published, while in America the names of the signers did not appear in print until the next year. Another contrast is the visual record. Photographs (published here) and film show the moment of Israeli independence. There were no images from July 4, 1776—the ubiquitous picture of the signing was painted by John Trumbull in 1817-1819 as he imagined it.

Condition

Good. Some folds reinforced, three pieces loose but present, only one affecting text.


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