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Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln

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Lincoln’s Final State of the Union Message, 1864

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Observer, New York, N.Y.: Sidney E. Morse and Richard C. Morse. December 8, 1864. Includes complete printing of Lincoln’s last annual message to Congress. 8 pp. (385-392), 18¼ x 25 in.

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In his fourth and final State of the Union address to Congress, President Lincoln reaffirms his commitment both to restoring the Union through military victory and his determination to see the end of slavery in the United States. After briefly addressing foreign affairs and inviting Congressional attention to the reports of his Cabinet officers, Lincoln notes that “The war continues.” He expresses pleasure at the steady advance of Union forces, allowing many occupied areas to grow crops, and admires the confidence of the Union forces illustrated by General William T. Sherman’s march through Georgia, then underway.

The President draws several lessons from the 1864 national elections recently completed. First, he believes the election demonstrates a unanimous and unshakeable commitment to restoring the Union. Second, he finds hope because the human and natural resources of the Union are both “unexhausted” and “inexhaustible.” Seeing immigration as a “replenishing stream,” Lincoln looks forward to a future when Atlantic and Pacific states are connected by “railways and telegraph lines.” Third, he sees a growing commitment to emancipation.

Therefore, he urges the House of Representatives to pass the proposed Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, even before the next Congress takes office. Lincoln remains committed to emancipation and the destruction of slavery, even while offering lenient pardon to those rebels willing to return to their allegiance to the Union, either individually or collectively.

Item #30001.23, $500

Pro-Lincoln Reelection Broadside

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Pro Lincoln 1864 Campaign Broadside. 1864. 1 p., 10 1/8 x 13 1/8 in.

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Item #23110, $600

A Confederate Newspaper Prints Lincoln’s Response
to Horace Greeley’s Anti-Slavery Editorial

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Richmond Whig, Richmond, Va., August 30, 1862. 2 pp., 17 x 24 in.

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On the front page under “News from the North” is the text of Abraham Lincoln’s reply to New York Tribune editor Horace Greeley. Greeley’s letter urging Lincoln to emancipate all slaves in Union-held territory was known as “The Prayer of Twenty Millions.” It was first published on August 20, 1862. Lincoln responded on August 22, declaring that his paramount goal is to save the Union, regardless of its effect on slavery, as well as his personal views that all men should be free.

Item #30007.01, $650

An Early Lincoln Campaign Biography

JOHN LOCKE SCRIPPS, Pamphlet, “Tribune Tracts –No. 6. Life of Abraham Lincoln. Chapter 1. Early Life.” New York: Tribune, 1860. 32 pp. Original stitching intact, ads for The New York Tribune and the Tribune Almanac of 1860 on back cover, light age, small tear at bottom right not affecting text, minor chipping, otherwise good. 6 x 9¼ in.

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An early Lincoln campaign biography based on interviews with Lincoln associates in Springfield.

Item #20521, $650

The Nation Mourns

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 6, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Engravings include: Lincoln and son Tad at home. Scene at the death bed of President Lincoln. Funeral service at the White House. Ford’s Theatre. Attempted assassination of Secretary Seward. Citizens viewing the body at City Hall, New York.

Item #H-5-6-1865, ON HOLD

Lincoln’s 1861 State of the Union Message

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. Message of the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress..., Volume 1, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1861. 839 pp., 5¾ x 8¾ in.

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Item #22671, $800

Frederick Douglass Signed Deed

FREDERICK DOUGLASS, Document Signed as recorder of deeds, Washington, D.C., 1881-1886. Approx. 3½ x 8½” folded. Sample Frame pictured.

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While Douglass’s letters are scarce, documents signed during his tenure as recorder of deeds for the District of Columbia can be had very reasonably.

Item #20409, $895

“Old Neptune” and Stephen P. Lee Together

GIDEON WELLES, Letter Signed as Secretary of the Navy, Navy Department, Washington, June 16, 1865.

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Gideon Welles and Stephen P. Lee revoke an appointment at the end of the war.

Item #21893, $900

“Let Us Have Faith that Right Makes Might…”

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN] SCHUYLER COLFAX, Autograph Quote Signed, from Lincoln’s Cooper Institute speech given on February 27, 1860. Sept 10, 1877.

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Schuyler Colfax, U.S. representative from Indiana and vice president under Ulysses S. Grant, pens a famous quote from Lincoln’s Cooper Institute speech.

Item #23916, $950

Lincoln Prepares the Union Army to Vote
in the Election of 1864

SETH WILLIAMS. [ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Letter Signed to Richard N. Batchelder. “Head Qrs Army of the Potomac,” September 1, 1864.

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Written just two months before the 1864 presidential election, Lincoln was banking on votes of soldier to secure his re-election.

Item #22952, $950

Lincoln’s Third State of the Union Address
and Amnesty Proclamation

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Times, New York, N.Y., Dec. 10, 1863, with “Supplement to The New York Times” complete with its own masthead. 12 pp. 14¾ x 21 in.

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Contains Lincoln’s entire 1863 Message to Congress, where he reaffirmed his commitment to emancipation, as well as His Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction, which laid out a plan to return the rebellious states to the Union fold. Commonly called the “Ten Percent Plan,” it allowed for a state to hold new elections when 10% of its 1860 voters took a loyalty oath to the Union.

Item #30001.20, $950

Lincoln Calls for the public to supports the U.S. Sanitary Commission

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. HENRY W. BELLOWS, Printed Circular Letter, to “the Loyal Women of America.” Washington, D.C., October 1, 1861. 3 pp., 8 x 10 in.

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The Sanitary Commission is … of direct practical value to the nation, in this time of its trial. It is entitled to the gratitude and confidence of the people… There is no agency through which voluntary offerings of patriotism can be more effectively made.  A. Lincoln.

Item #24870, $950

Daniel Chester French Adds Lincoln Memorial Statue to His Biography for Who’s Who

DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH, Printed Entry for Who’s Who in America, with handwritten correction, signed by French at bottom. October 1, 1921. New York City. 1 p. 8½ x 10¾ in.

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In 1899, Albert Nelson Marquis (1855-1943) published the first edition of Who’s Who in America with biographical information on 8,602 “leaders and achievers” from “every significant field of endeavor.” For the twelfth volume, to be published in 1922 or 1923, French received a printed version of his prior entry with a request for updates. French added his latest and greatest accomplishment, the completion in 1920 of his sculpture for the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Item #24358, $1,000

Lincoln’s Vice President Talks Local Politics, Muses on Benjamin Wade’s Presidential Potential, and Mulls
Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment Trial

HANNIBAL HAMLIN, Autograph Letters Signed, to Sidney Perham. Bangor, Me., May 9, 1868 and Boston, May 4, 1866. Two letters, both 2 pp., 5 x 8 in., marked “Private” and docketed “H Hamlin.” One on Custom House Collector’s Office letterhead.

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Item #22863, $1,200

Rare Lincoln 1864 Presidential Campaign Newspaper

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Newspaper. Father Abraham. Reading, PA: October 4, 1864. Vol 1, No 10. 4 pp., 17¾ x 11¾ in.

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Item #23426, $1,250

A Copperhead Newspaper Prints, Then Criticizes,
the Emancipation Proclamation

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, Newspaper. New York Journal of Commerce. New York, N.Y., January 3, 1863. 4 pp., 24 x 32½ in.

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An early report of the Emancipation Proclamation, where the editors describe Lincoln’s bold move as “a farce coming in after a long tragedy....Most of the people regard it as a very foolish piece of business.”

Item #22448.01, $1,450

The 1858 Debates that Propelled Lincoln to National Attention

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. Political Debates Between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, in the Celebrated Campaign of 1858, in Illinois. Columbus, Ohio: Follett, Foster, and Co., 1860. 3rd edition, with publisher’s advertisements bound in. 268 pp., 6½ x 9½ in.

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Item #22476, $1,500

Battle of Gettysburg Prisoner of War Broadside:
Confederate Guards Shooting Unarmed Yankees

[GETTYSBURG], Broadside. The Gettysburg Prisoners. March from Gettysburg to Staunton, 175 Miles..., Annapolis, Maryland, September 28, 1863, 14½ x 6 in., 1 pp.

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“At the request of a large number of my fellow Bell Island, prisoners of War, I have written a short sketch from my notes taken on the spot, and have put the same in type. The account imbraces [sic] from the 2nd of July at Gettysburg, Pa., up to September 21st, on Bell Island. The statement is facts only, and not from an imaginary brain….

Union private George Gantt exposes the dismal treatment of Union prisoners of war after the Battle of Gettysburg.

Item #22245, $1,750

The Gettysburg Address

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. Includes a foldout map of the planned cemetery and a copy of Lincoln’s dedication. Published in Harrisburg, 1864. Fair condition.

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Report of the Select Committee Relative to the Soldier’s National Cemetery, Together with the Accompanying Documents, as Reported to the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, March 31, 1864.

Item #21371, $1,750

Currier and Ives Mourn Lincoln After His Assassination

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Print. Abraham Lincoln. The Nations Martyr. Assassinated April 14th. 1865. Currier & Ives, New York, N.Y., 1865. 1 p., 13½ x 18 in. Light toning.

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Item #22935, $1,800
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