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Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln

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Union League of Philadelphia Supports Lincoln on Emancipation, African-American Troops in 1864

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. HENRY CHARLES LEA, Printed Pamphlet. No. 18: The Will of the People, [January – April 1864]. 8 pp., 5½ x 8½ in.

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The will of the people is supreme.

The vital principle of [Lincoln’s] whole administration has been his recognition of the fact, that our Government is simply a machine for carrying into effect THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE.

Item #24899, $250

1864 Campaign Blames McClellan’s Failures on Lincoln, Comparing the President’s Treatment of McClellan and Grant

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Printed Document. Democrat Campaign “Document No. 12” with headings “Lincoln’s Treatment of Gen. Grant,” “Mr. Lincoln’s Treatment of Gen. McClellan,” and “The Taint of Disunion.” [New York, 1864.] 8 pp., 5¾ x 8⅝ in.

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with the same determination to divide the country unless they can secure universal abolition, we are exposed to the same dangers every day, and God only knows in what unlucky hour our ruin may be consummated... Compare his policy with McClellan’s expression of readiness to receive any State when its people offer to submit to the Union.

This Democratic Party campaign pamphlet quotes an April 1864 letter to argue that Lincoln gave Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant free rein to conduct the war, after having interfered with and micromanaged McClellan’s Peninsula Campaign in 1862. The publication also declared that Republicans were stained with “The Taint of Disunion” and quoted from Republican speeches and editorials to insist that the Democrats were the party of “UNION AND PEACE.”

Item #24901.02, $450

Supporting McClellan against Lincoln in 1864 Campaign Pamphlets

[CIVIL WAR], Book. Hand-Book of the Democracy, a collection of 39 pamphlets. New York: Democratic Central Executive Campaign Documents, 1864; New York: Society for the Diffusion of Political Knowledge, 1863-1864. 33. Original printed wrappers with wrapper title, as issued. 5¾ x 8¾ in. Sabin 30204.

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This remarkable collection of campaign pamphlets from the presidential election of 1864 includes 17 pamphlets issued by the Democratic Central Executive Campaign Committee and 22 pamphlets published by the Society for the Diffusion of Political Knowledge. Together, they constitute a vindication of Democratic candidate and former general George B. McClellan and a harsh condemnation of Abraham Lincoln, his administration, and the northern conduct of the war.

Item #23744, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Miscegenation, or the Millennium of Abolitionism – Stirring Fear of Interracial Marriage Before 1864 Presidential Election

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. [RACISM], Print. “Miscegenation, or the Millennium of Abolitionism.” Political Cartoon. New York: Bromley & Co., 1864. 1 p., 20¾ x 13⅝ in.

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The second in a series of four racist political cartoons published in 1864 by Bromley & Company, which was closely affiliated with the Copperhead New York World newspaper. These prints sought to undermine Abraham Lincoln’s chances for reelection by branding him as a “miscegenationist” and playing on white fears of “race-mixing.” The cartoon scene pictures several interracial couples enjoying a day at the park, eating ice cream, discussing wedding plans, and a woman’s upcoming lecture. Two African American families have white employees, a carriage driver and footmen and a babysitter.

The only other example traced at auction brought $7,800 in 2010.

Item #25614, $7,800

The Gettysburg Address

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. Includes a foldout map of the planned cemetery and a copy of Lincoln’s dedication. Published in Harrisburg, 1864. Fair condition.

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Report of the Select Committee Relative to the Soldier’s National Cemetery, Together with the Accompanying Documents, as Reported to the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, March 31, 1864.

Item #21371, $1,750

Abraham Lincoln Joke Book—Printed Before Election of 1864

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Old Abe’s Jokes: Fresh from Abraham’s Bosom. Containing All His Issues, Excepting the “Greenbacks,” To Call in Some of Which, This Volume is Issued. Book. New York: T. R. Dawley, Publishers, 1864. 140 pp., 5 x 7½ in.

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A collection of humorous anecdotes and stories mixed with Lincoln’s biography.

Item #23925, $450

Lincoln’s Third State of the Union Address
and Amnesty Proclamation

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Times, New York, N.Y., Dec. 10, 1863, with “Supplement to The New York Times” complete with its own masthead. 12 pp. 14¾ x 21 in.

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Contains Lincoln’s entire 1863 Message to Congress, where he reaffirmed his commitment to emancipation, as well as His Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction, which laid out a plan to return the rebellious states to the Union fold. Commonly called the “Ten Percent Plan,” it allowed for a state to hold new elections when 10% of its 1860 voters took a loyalty oath to the Union.

Item #30001.20, $950

The Gettysburg Address, with Full Centerfold Illustrations of the Battlefield and Lincoln’s Dedication Ceremony

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, New York, December 5, 1863. 16 pp., complete.

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and that Government of the people, for the people, and for all people, shall not perish from earth.

As printing technology advanced through the middle decades of the nineteenth century, illustrated newspapers grew in popularity even though their engravings added a few weeks to press time. Leslie’s printing—from December 5—includes an article containing the full text of Lincoln’s timeless speech (page 11). Illustrations include a centerfold spread with the formal dedication ceremony prominently placed, and smaller views of Union and rebel graves, defensive works, Meade’s headquarters, and a view of the town (centerfold). A large illustration of “The War in Tennessee—Lookout Mountain and Its Vicinity” appears on the front page.

There is no definitive text that captures exactly how Lincoln spoke that day, though the AP reporter’s text is most familiar. Leslie’s printing, following the Philadelphia Enquirer version, contains variations, most notably in the final two sentences regarding the nation’s unfinished work and closing phrase of “Government of the people, for the people, and for all people” rather than “of the people, by the people, and for the people.

Item #23577.01, $1,250

The Gettysburg Address, with Full Centerfold Illustrations of the Battlefield and Lincoln’s Dedication Ceremony (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, New York, December 5, 1863. 16 pp., complete.

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“and that Government of the people, for the people, and for all people, shall not perish from earth.”

Item #22629.01, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Gettysburg Address – November 20, 1863 Rare First Day Printing by “Lincoln’s Dog” John Forney in the Philadelphia Press

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, Philadelphia Press, Philadelphia, November 20, 1863. Complete, 4 pp., approx. 20¼ x 28 in.

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The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract…

Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is on page 2, along with Edward Everett’s entire speech, and a report on the ceremonies. Printed in an important newspaper owned by John Forney, this version is in some ways more accurate than the more widely spread Associated Press report.

Item #25971, $6,000

A Philadelphia First-Day Printing of the Gettysburg Address (SOLD)

GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper. North American and United States Gazette, Philadelphia, Pa., November 20, 1863. 4 pp., 23 x 29 in. Chips missing from masthead and right edge, some internal tears, not affecting Lincoln’s speech which is on second page, fourth column, 2/3 of the way down. Much of the first two pages are taken up with Gettysburg-related news, including Edward Everett’s Address.

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“Four score and seven years ago”

Item #22449.01, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Abraham Lincoln Suspends Habeas Corpus and Army Orders Officers to Resist Writs

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Edwin M. Stanton, General Orders, No. 315, September 17, 1863, conveying President Lincoln’s Proclamation Suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus Throughout the United States, September 15, 1863. Printed Document. Proclamation signed in type by Abraham Lincoln and William H. Seward; Order signed in type by Assistant Adjutant General E. D. Townsend, by order of the Secretary of War. 2 pp., 5 x 7⅜ in.

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I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do hereby proclaim...that the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus is suspended throughout the United States....

Item #24901.01, $375

President Lincoln Seeks Appointment to Naval Academy for His Wife’s Young Cousin

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Gideon Welles, August 21, 1863, Washington, D.C. 1 p., 4⅞ x 8 in.

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Item #25970.99, $17,500

Lincoln Orders a National Day of Thanksgiving in Honor of the Union Victory at Gettysburg

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. [THANKSGIVING], Broadside. Proclamation of Thanksgiving. Massachusetts, [probably Boston], ca. July 27-August 6, 1863. 1 p., 20 x 28 in.

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Lincoln’s first call for a national day of Thanksgiving.

Item #23584, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Three Weeks after Gettysburg,
Lincoln Calls For More Pennsylvania Troops (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Partly Printed Document Signed as President, July 24, 1863, Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C., 1 p., 7¾ x 9¾ in.

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Lincoln’s 1863 draft order for the 18th District of Pennsylvania. This was one of the first draft calls ever signed, and was executed about two weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, and one week after the New York Draft Riots.

Item #22532, SOLD — please inquire about other items

A Union Officer’s Commission, and Field Report from
the 17th Connecticut Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg

[CIVIL WAR – GETTYSBURG], Allen G. Brady, Autograph Manuscript, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1863. 6 pp., in pencil, an unsigned draft or retained copy.

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A field report from the Battle of Gettysburg by Major Allen G. Brady, commander of the 17th Connecticut Regiment, written on the 4th of July, 1863, the day after the battle ended in a great victory for the Union.

“We had not more than time to form before the enemy were discovered advancing rapidly upon us on our right & a full Brigade obliquely towards our left….our fire was so destructive it checked their advance the troops on our left giving way the enemy came in behind us but we still remained firmly at the stone wall until the rebels were driven back.”

Item #21808, $7,500

President Lincoln Vouches for a Maryland Unionist Congressman

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Robert C. Schenck, May 31, 1863, Washington, D.C. 1 p.

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I esteem Gov. Francis Thomas, as an able, and very true man. I do not know that he agrees with me in everything—perhaps he does not; but he has given me evidence of sincere friendship, & as I think, of patriotism.

Item #25464, $39,500

Lincoln Reviews the Army of the Potomac

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 2, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Collecting confiscated rebel cotton. Ironclad Keokuk sinking after the battle at Charleston. Pres. Lincoln, General Hooker, and their staff at a review of the Army of the Potomac. Bombardment of Fort Sumter.

Item #H-5-2-1863, $100

Illustrations of African Americans Freeing Themselves
by Moving Toward Union Lines

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, February 21, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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General Tom Thumb and his bride grace the front page, but “The Effects of the Proclamation—Freed Negroes Coming Into Our Lines at Newbern, North Carolina” is the most significant illustration, occupying all of the fourth page. Also, “Departure of the Great Southern Expedition from Beaufort, North Carolina”; The Rebel Rams Engaging Our Blockading Fleet Off Charleston, South Carolina”; “Hearts and Hands, St. Valentine’s Day, 1863” is the romantic centerfold; “Ft.  Hindman, Arkansas”; “Iron Clad ‘Montauk’ Engaging the Rebel Fort M’Allister in the Ogeechee River.”

Item #H 2-21-1863, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln Commission of William D. Porter
as Commodore in the Navy (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Partially Printed Document Signed as President, co-signed by Gideon Welles as Secretary of the Navy and William Pelloran. Washington, D.C., January 26, 1863. 1 p., 16¼ x 18½ in., on vellum.

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The third brother of a famous naval family receives his Civil War commission from Lincoln.

Item #22833, SOLD — please inquire about other items
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