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Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein

"If everybody lived a life like mine, there would be no need for novels."  -  Albert Einstein


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Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Typed Document Signed, Princeton, N.J., April 19, 1950. 1 p., 8¼ x 11¼ in. 1 p. On “Didier, Publisher” letterhead paper, addressed to Einstein, in Princeton, and signed by him. Formerly folded, envelope stapled on the back.

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Item #24253, $12,500

Even before Hiroshima, Einstein warns that new technology could cause WWIII

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Typed Letter Signed, in German, January 18, 1945, 1 p, 4to, Princeton, to Dr. Isidore Held, on blindstamped letterhead. 8½ x 11 in.

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when one stops mid-stream, the next world war is certain already today. This is all the more the case when modern technical development is leading more and more to a pre-emptive war by the fact that a surprise attack is extraordinarily superior to the defense.

Though a lifelong pacifist, Einstein was pragmatic about self-defense and the need to defeat the evil of Nazism. Einstein co-signed the pivotal letter (with Leo Szilard) in 1939, alerting President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the possibility of an atomic bomb. Clearly, the "modern technical development" was the Atomic Bomb, and with the existence of the Manhattan Project being top secret, Einstein could not expand on his thought here.

The “little book” his friend Dr. Isidore Held had sent in January 1945 apparently opposed the creation of a supranational body – ultimately, the United Nations.  Einstein was passionately committed to global peace, and here he expresses the need to support, not attack, the formation of such an authority.

Since then, under threat of preemptive war or the doctrine of mutually assured destruction, false alarms brought us "this close" to nuclear war several times. Despite its many flaws, the U.N. played an important role in reducing the imminent threat of annihilation more than once.

Item #24333, $10,000

Einstein Reveals Reservations of Associating with Communism

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Typed Letter Signed (“A. Einstein”), in English to Professor Albert Sprague Coolidge of Harvard University, Princeton, NJ, February 16, 1934. 1p 8½ x 11 in. Envelope folds, minor spotting.

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“On the one hand, the world-wide danger of fascism makes it necessary that all enemies of fascism cooperate; on the other hand, an action which has communist leanings might endanger that fight...”

This letter, in addition to underscoring Einstein’s passionate stance against fascism, is particularly important as documentary evidence of Einstein’s caution about having any dealings with communism, especially considering that the U.S. FBI, worried about Einstein’s political leanings, kept a file on Einstein that grew to 1427 pages.

Item #24885, $18,000

One of Einstein’s Best Metaphysical Letters - Counseling His Son on the Meaning of Life and Youth and the Relative Value of Intellectual Creations

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Autograph Letter Signed (“Papa”), in German, to his son Eduard (“Tete” for “petit”). [December 27, 1932]. 2 pp, 8½ x 11 in.

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“All my life I have troubled myself with problems and am always – as on the first day – inspired by the fact that cognition in the scientific and artistic sense is the best thing we possess… If one hears the angels singing a couple of times during one’s life, one can give the world something and one is a particularly fortunate and blessed individual.”

Item #23789, $48,000

Shortly Before his Self-imposed Exile from Germany, Albert Einstein Supports an International Language to Promote Peace and Understanding

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Typed Document Signed, Berlin, Germany, December 18, 1929. 1 p., 8¼ x 11¼ in. In German, with Einstein’s autograph accomplishments.

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“I am willing to join the federation for the introduction of an international auxiliary language to promote understanding, peace, and cooperation among nations.”

Einstein was a lifelong champion of efforts to eliminate of the nationalist divisions that leaders erected between peoples, often to deadly effect. Esperanto, the “international auxiliary language,” was an easy to learn, politically neutral language invented by L.L. Zamenhof, a Polish ophthalmologist, in the 1870s-1880s. His goals, to transcend nationalism and create harmony and peace in the world community, were certainly shared by Einstein — and pilloried as a Jewish conspiracy by Adolf Hitler. Considering the date of the pledge, Einstein was taking an early stand against the Fascist future into which Europe was about to descend.

Item #24023, $6,000

Albert Einstein on the search for greater meaning: “Using such apothecary’s methods one cannot reveal any of God’s secrets, I think.” A Swiss chemist’s work leaves Einstein cold, but Schrödinger “has the scent of a deeper truth.”

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Autograph Correspondence Card Signed, to Michele Besso, May 1, 1926, Berlin. In German. 1 p., 4¼ x 5⅞ in.

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Item #25045, $90,000

Einstein is glad that “the woman” (his estranged wife) is feeling better, and reports that he is living “peacefully and contentedly in my quiet cell” in Berlin, “as if people had all gone into hibernation; because whatever is active does not suggest human feeling

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Autograph Note Signed, to Heinrich Zangger, August 1916 (postmarked August 24), Berlin, Germany. 1 p., 5½ x 3½ in.

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Besso, who is in Berne right now, informs me that my wife is feeling a bit better…. In any case, I am glad that the woman is receiving the best care possible. Aside from this worry, I am living peacefully and contentedly in my quiet cell, into which no newspapers penetrate. I have the feeling as if people had all gone into hibernation; because whatever is active does not suggest human feeling.

Item #25054, $9,500

The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind

[ALBERT EINSTEIN], Ephemera. Set of Anker-Steinbaukasten children’s building blocks by F. Ad. Richter & Cie., Rudolstadt, [Germany], c.1880s. Approximately 160 composite quartz sand, chalk, and linseed oil blocks in red, limestone and slate gray, in various sizes and shapes, together with three or more sets of building plans, all contained in two wooden boxes with printed Anker-Steinbaukasten labels.

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A unique and important artifact of his childhood.

Item #24284, $160,000