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Civil War and Reconstruction

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Opposing the Confederate Draft

[CIVIL WAR – CONFEDERACY], Broadside. “The Petition of Certain Non-Conscripts, Respectfully Presented to the Confederate States Congress.” Richmond, August 8, 1862. Signed in print, “The Petitioners, By their Counsel, John H. Gilmer.” 1 p., 7⅞ x 10⅜ in.

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Petitioning against General Order No. 46 of the Confederate War Department, which rescinded the part of the Confederate Conscription Act of April 16, 1862 that mandated the discharge of all voluntary enlistees under age 18 or over age 35 in July 1862. “These were the terms of the law. They were plain, unequivocal and mandatory. Common sense – universal public opinion … understood, accepted and adopted the law ... Shall an army order revoke a solemn act of Congress? … Have we a constitutional Government, with specific powers granted … or have we an unlimited Government, dependent only on Executive will or ministerial caprice? Are the People free or is the Executive supreme?”

Item #21781, $1,500

Union Soldier Hopes the Draft Will Replenish His Devastated Regiment

L. A. GRAHAM, Autograph Letter Signed, on patriotic letterhead, to his sister, August 18, 1862, Paterson’s Park Hospital, Baltimore, 3 pp.

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i think that I shal go to my rigment in a weak or to they hant but 73 men left in my rigment so the paper says so that i dont no as i could find them if i should try to....i am glad they are a goen to draft so they will be apt to get som of them that is a fraid they will half to sleap on the ground

Item #21265.29, $150

The Army of the Potomac Arriving at Yorktown from Williamsburg

[HARPER’S WEEKLY], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, September 6, 1862.

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Item #H-9-6-1862, $250

George McClellan Boxing with Robert E. Lee:
Cartoon Celebrating the Union Victory at Antietam (SOLD)

[ANTIETAM]. [ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Lithographic Print, “The Last Round. Little Mac vs Big Charley,” from Wilkes’ Spirit of the Times, New York, N.Y. [after September 17, 1862]. 1 p., 15 x 12 in.

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This political cartoon celebrates the Union victory in the Battle of Antietam, depicting the bloodbath as a boxing contest between Confederate General Robert E. Lee (labeled “Charles” Lee in reference to the Revolutionary War traitor) and Union General George McClellan. European leaders watch as Jefferson Davis exclaims “My Game is Up” and Abraham Lincoln encourages his champion to “Give him fits my darling!” The handlers are African Americans, and Lee appears ready to throw in the sponge. The printer is unspecified, but it was issued by Wilkes’ Spirit of the Times, a New York publication that appealed to upper class sports aficionados.

Item #22318, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Army of the Potomac Surgeon’s Diary:
Antietam to Chancellorsville (SOLD)

[CIVIL WAR]. ROBERT ELMER, Autograph Manuscript Signed. Diary. September 26, 1862-June 11, 1863. 46 pp. 4 ½ x 3”.

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“I rode in company with the President & Staff to review the others…”

Excellent-contentdiary with daily entries, written by Assistant Surgeon Robert W. Elmer of the 23rd New Jersey Regt., covering his service from September 26, 1862 through July 1, 1863, when he was mustered out. Includes post-battle observations of the Antietam battlefield. Elmer recounts accompanying President Lincoln on his review of the Army of the Potomac on April 8, 1863, and the subsequent bloody combat experienced by General Sedgwick’s VI Corps in the Chancellorsville campaign. Elmer writes on May 3, 1863, as Sedgwick drives General Jubal Early’s skeleton force off of Marye’s Heights in the Battle of Salem Church, an important side engagement during the Battle of Chancellorsville, “The batteries of the Rebs on the hills above Fredericksburg were captured about ten oclock. Our forces then marched through the city & followed them up on the Plank road to Richmond about three miles were there was another severe engagment in which a greater number of our men were killed & wounded than previously. I was kept very busy till late in the evening dressing the wounds. Laid down at night in a field of wheat & slept like a rock till morning.

Item #21895, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation
and Pivotal Battle of Antietam (SOLD)

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, October 4, 1862. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Contains a Thomas Nast illustration: “McClellan Entering Frederick, Maryland” on the front page. Inside: The Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, September 22, 1862. View of Harpers Ferry and Maryland Heights. War map of Kentucky. Capitol grounds at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania turned into a camp. Centerfold: Battle of Antietam. Grand depot for General Grant’s army at Columbus, Kentucky.

Item #22505, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Reporting the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation
and the Union Victory That Precipitated It (SOLD)

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, New York, N.Y., October 11, 1862. 16 pp., 11 x 16 in.

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Reporting the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest day in American history, and the occasion for Lincoln to issue his preliminary Emancipation Proclamation warning the South to return to the Union or face losing their slaves.

Item #22501.41, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Three Special Orders Signed
by Gen. Townsend Re. Capt. Abbott

EDWARD D. TOWNSEND. Brig. Gen. and Assistant Adjutant General, 3 Special Orders Signed, from the Adjutant-General’s Office, War Department, to (and docketed by) Capt. Henry L. Abbott, Colonel of Volunteers, Corps of Topographical Engineers, variously under Generals Barnard, Banks, &c. Henry L. Abbott (1831-1927) commanded the Army of the Potomac’s siege artillery at Petersburg. For this and other recognizable services during the war, he was brevetted brigadier general.

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Item #20577.01-.03, $160

Horace Greeley Notes the Civil War Overwhelms Agriculture in Public Mind

HORACE GREELEY, Autograph Letter Signed to J. N. Bagg, November 11, 1862. 1 p.

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Fighting, not farming, engrosses public attention at this time....

Item #22514.06, $395

Broadsheet of Lincoln’s 1862 State of the Union Message

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Broadsheet, “Sentinel Extra” [place unknown[1]], ca. December 2, 1862, 9⅛ x 24 in. 2 pp.

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We cannot escape history… In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free… We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best, hope of earth...

One month before signing the Emancipation Proclamation, the president proposes colonization and his plan for compensated emancipation, discusses foreign affairs, reports on progress of the Pacific Railroad, the war and finance. This rare “Sentinel Extra” broadsheet (apparently unrecorded in OCLC) has other news of the day on the verso, including a fantastic article quoting General Meagher’s reaction to the resignation of several officers after McClellan was removed.

Item #22179, $4,900

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper with United States Colored Troop (USCT) Images

[AFRICAN-AMERICAN SOLDIERS], Newspapers. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated, December 13, and December 20, 1862, 16 pp. each. (Two issues)

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Two war-dated newspapers showing African Americans in the Civil War:

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated, December 20, 1862: “The South Carolina Loyal Colored Regiment in Action,” including “Picking off Rebel Sharpshooters.”  And, “The Negro Drivers of the Baggage Train.”

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated, December 13, 1862: Contrabands looking on at “Camp at Stafford’s Store Virginia.”

Item #22483.01-.02, $375

A Union Officer Sheds New Light
on the Battle of Fredericksburg, with Schematic Drawings

[CIVIL WAR]. EDGAR A. BURPEE, Autograph Letter Signed, to Alexander Burpee. Fredericksburg, Va., December 15, 1862, 12 pp., 5 1/8 x 7¾ in.

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Mainer Edgar Alphonso Burpee describes the Battle of Fredericksburg, providing previously-unknown details regarding order of battle, Union movement through city streets, “unbecoming” ransacking of civilian property, and Confederates shelling Union-occupied parts of their city. He also includes drawings of the city’s streets.

Item #22500, $2,600

“MEN OF COLOR: To Arms! To Arms!”

Frederick Douglass, Broadside. “Men of Color / To Arms! To Arms!” U.S. Steam-Power Book and Job Printing Establishment, Ledger Buildings, Third and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, PA, [1863.] Signed in type by Frederick Douglass and 54 others, including many prominent African-American citizens. 44 x 87 in. Framed to 48 x 94 in.

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A monumental Frederick Douglass Civil War recruiting broadside.

African American men had joined Union forces throughout the Civil War, but it took Abraham Lincoln’s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863 to officially allow and encourage them to enlist. This monumental Philadelphia recruiting poster signals the seismic shift in policy.

The text of this dramatic poster was adapted from an impassioned editorial Frederick Douglass wrote in the March of 1863 issue of Douglass’ Monthly. “There is no time to delay… The tide is at its flood … From East to West, from North to South, the sky is written all over, ‘Now or never.’”

Item #22552, PRICE ON REQUEST

Trial of Abraham Lincoln by the Great Statesmen of the Republic, a Mock Trial of President Lincoln for Treason

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Pamphlet. Trial of Abraham Lincoln by the Great Statesmen of the Republic. A Council of the Past on the Tyranny of the Present. The Spirit of the Constitution on the Bench—Abraham Lincoln, Prisoner at the Bar, his own Counsel. New York: Office of the Metropolitan Record, 1863. Original printed wrappers, stitched. 29, [3] pp. First Edition.

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In this creative pamphlet, Lincoln stands trial before a jury of his “peers,” former presidents and statesmen from American history, including Stephen A. Douglas, Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John Hancock, Patrick Henry, Gouverneur Morris, Alexander Hamilton, John C. Calhoun, James Madison, George Mason, Elbridge Gerry, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and William Gaston. The author compiles passages from their speeches in mock dialogue with the defendant Lincoln as they contradict his defenses against their charges.

Item #23743, $980

Civil War Song Sheet: When Johnny Comes Marching Home

[PATRICK GILMORE], Broadside, “When Johnny comes marching home.” Philadelphia, Johnson & Co., Song Publishers. [1863-65]. 6 x 9 in., 1 p.

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When Johnny comes marching home again, Hurrah! Hurrah! / We’ll give him a hearty welcome then, Hurrah! Hurrah!...

Item #22946, $375

161 Young Men of Providence, R.I. Found “Loyal League” Pledged to Support the Union

[CIVIL WAR--RHODE ISLAND], Pledge and original membership roll of the Loyal League of Providence, Manuscript Document Signed, with 161 signatures, ca. January 1863, [Providence, RI]. 2 pp., 7¾ x 22¼ in.

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We, the members of the Loyal League, do hereby pledge ourselves, by words and acts, whenever practicable, to use our influence in support of the Government in all its measures for the suppression of the present unholy rebellion; and we will use our influence to discountenance and oppose all efforts in opposition to the Government and the Union.

Item #24584, $2,000

General Schofield’s Personal Gettysburg Official Records

[GETTYSBURG; GEN. JOHN M. SCHOFIELD], Books, 3 Volumes – The War of the Rebellion: Gettysburg Official Records, devoted to the Battle of Gettysburg. Owned by Union General John M. Schofield (with his stamp in first volume).

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Item #23060, $750

Battles and Baseball:
A New Yorker’s Red River Campaign Diaries (SOLD)

[CIVIL WAR], W.J. Race, Autograph Manuscript Signed, Two Pocket Diaries, 1863-1864, with daily entries; 3 ½ x 2 ¼” and 6 x 3”, original black morocco;

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“[2/11/64] This forenoon had a game at ball, knocked the ball to pieces & had to stop...[2/12/64] had a game at ball. Towards evening had another game at ball... 

Pair of war-date diaries of Wheaton J. Race, Company H, 114th Regiment of New York State Volunteers, incredibly detailed content on marching, daily camp activities and news, rumors, and more, fighting and retreating (“on the skedaddle”), and contains ink ownership signature of Race. The 114th N.Y. served principally under Nathaniel Banks in Louisiana, capturing Port Hudson on July 8, 1863, fighting in the failed Red River Expedition, and was reassigned to the Eastern theater in 1864.

Item #21807, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Civil War Era African-American Tintype (SOLD)

[AFRICAN-AMERICAN], Sixth Plate Tintype Photograph, ca. 1863-1865. Housed in good case.

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Tintype photograph of an African-American wearing a broad-brimmed hat and shell jacket. An old note tucked in the case identifies this as a “rare photo of a colored seaman”—but we have not been able to verify that.

Item #20971, SOLD — please inquire about other items

A Copperhead Newspaper Prints, Then Criticizes,
the Emancipation Proclamation

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, Newspaper. New York Journal of Commerce. New York, N.Y., January 3, 1863. 4 pp., 24 x 32½ in.

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An early report of the Emancipation Proclamation, where the editors describe Lincoln’s bold move as “a farce coming in after a long tragedy....Most of the people regard it as a very foolish piece of business.”

Item #22448.01, $1,450
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