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Ohio Governor’s Response to
South Carolina Nullification Threat

ALLEN TRIMBLE, Printed Letter Signed, for Trimble by S.C. Andrews, private secretary to the Governor of Pennsylvania, Columbus, Ohio, February 12, 1828.

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“I herewith transmit a copy of the Preamble and Resolutions of the General Assembly of Ohio, in reply to the Resolutions from the Legislature of South Carolina, respecting the Constitutional powers of the General Government.”

Item #21057, $1,500

A Former Tennessee Congressman Thanks an Editor for Opposing Southern Nullifiers, and Criticizes Andrew Jackson’s Political Vindictiveness

JAMES B. REYNOLDS, Autograph Letter Signed, to Hezekiah Niles. Clarksville, Tenn., January 12, 1831. 3 pp., 9¾ x 8 in., with integral address leaf.

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Former Tennessee congressman James Reynolds thanks newspaper editor Hezekiah Niles for standing against Southern nullifiers while offering insight into the spiteful tactics Jackson used against Reynolds once elected to the presidency. Jackson won the presidency in 1828 after losing in 1824 to John Quincy Adams. Apparently, fellow Tennessean Reynolds did not complain enough about the “corrupt bargain” election of 1824—and Andrew Jackson held a grudge.

Item #22535, $2,500

Winfield Scott Criticizes Zachary Taylor’s
Illegal Order to Flog a Soldier

WINFIELD SCOTT, Autograph Document Signed, November 18, 1843, with annotations initialed by him and dated December 1843. 2 pp.

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“.... [H]earing of the illegal order & the illegal flogging, I looked into the case…”

Item #20735, $975

Ohio Reformers Use Rhode Island’s Dorr Rebellion
to Justify Their Own Behavior

[DORR WAR], Pamphlet. The Dorr Movement in Ohio; Being an Examination into the Causes, Progress and Probable Effects of the Revolutionary Course of Locofocoism in the Organization of the General Assembly of This State, for the Session of 1848-49. [Columbus, Ohio]: Legg & Murray, Columbus, [1849]. Disbound. Inscribed in pencil on the title by H.A. Swift, the author, in presentation.

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Item #22543, $800

The Reform Constitution of Virginia Signed by the Man Who Warned South Carolina Governor Pickens about the Reinforcement of Fort Sumter

LITTLETON Q. WASHINGTON, Pamphlet, Constitution of Virginia, ca. 1851, signed at top in ink, “L. Q. Washington,” with pencil beneath (in another hand), “Mr. Washington Asst. Secty of State 1850-1851.” 33 pp., 5⅝ x 8⅝ in.

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After Virginia adopted the Declaration of Independence, George Mason and James Madison began drafting a state Constitution. For James Madison, helping draft his state’s Constitution would serve as a dress rehearsal for his future task of writing the U.S. Constitution. Virginia adopted its first constitution in 1776, and a major revision in 1830 loosened suffrage requirements. As more residents populated the western counties, they were underrepresented in the legislature because of continuing property requirements for voting.

The most significant changes in the 1851 Constitution included the extension of the suffrage to all white males of voting age, the creation of the office of lieutenant governor, and the election rather than appointment of judges. Because of these changes, this version has been called the Reform Constitution.

Item #22395, $2,000

Charles Sumner Discusses the Emerging Duty
of the United States in Promoting Human Rights &
World Peace Evoking the Declaration of Independence and Championing Louis Kossuth and his Exploits

CHARLES SUMNER, Autograph Letter Signed, Boston, October 26, 1851. 4 pp., 7 x 9 in.

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“The influence, we are now able to wield, is a sacred trust, which should be exercised firmly, discreetly, in conformity with the Laws of Nations & with an anxious eye to the peace of the world, so as always to promote the great cause of Human Rights. Our example can do much”

Item #20287, $2,750

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin From 1852 – Year of First Publication – Presented “in 1881 by Mrs. Ann Lewis, a colored friend, as her choice treasure.”

[HARRIET BEECHER STOWE], Uncle Tom’s Cabin,; or, Life Among the Lowly. Boston: John P Jewett & Company, and Cleveland, Ohio: Jewett, Proctor & Worthington, 1852. The first edition was issued in Boston by the same publisher earlier in the same year. Its immediate success is witnessed by an addition to the imprint above the publisher’s name: “Seventieth Thousand.” Two volumes, 312 and 322 pp. respectively, both inscribed, “The Crawford’s/ Ithaca/ New York/ Presented in 1881 by Mrs. Ann Lewis, a colored friend, as her choice treasure.” With later pencil inscription, “Given to Mr & Mrs E.M. Newton by Mrs Crawford/ Sept 16 1924.

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Item #24794, $2,200

Print of the N.Y. 7th Regiment on Parade Drill in Washington Square, With NYU in the Background

[NEW YORK], Hand-colored lithograph, N.Y., [1852], entitled “National Guard, 7th. Regt. N.Y.S.M. / From the Original picture by Major Bötticher in the possession of the 8th. Co. N.G. / [The principal heads from Daguerreotypes – by Meade Brothers 233 Broadway N.Y. / New York, Published by Otto Bötticher, 289 Broadway].” “[O]n Stone by C. Gildemeister, 289 Broadway N.Y. / Print by Nagel & Weingaertner N.[Y.]” “Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1852 by Otto Bötticher…” 36 x 28 in. (sheet size).

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A beautifully hand-colored lithographic print showing the regiment on parade with mounted officers viewing from the left, and the public from the right. A scarce print.

Item #21671, $2,250

Naval Commander Who Prevented Filibustering Expedition against Mexico, and Then Captured Slave Ships and Freed over 1,350 Slaves

THOMAS A. DORNIN, Manuscript Letter Signed, U.S.S. Portsmouth, Norfolk, Virginia, April 4, 1855, to Mid. John Walker, U.S.N. 1 p.

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Item #20956, $950

The Dark and Bloody Ground of Civil War Kentucky

CIVIL WAR—KENTUCKY, 24 Autograph Letters Signed (6 pre-war, 16 war-date, and 2 post-war), to Lucy Ann Robbins Ligon, 78 pp, folio, various places including Hickman, Kentucky, Tupelo, Mississippi, and Knoxville and Memphis, Tennessee, 1856-1865. Condition good to poor, with foxing, chipped margins, light toning throughout, but several letters have good content ranging from personal and matrimonial, to political and war related.

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“When you find him out for me just tell him to write to me your say so is sufficient recommendation if he is not worth a dollar I don’t care so he does not drink whiskey to and excel play cards and has business qualifications I want the jewel to consist of himself. I want him to be handsome intelligent polite good natured no profusion of fob chaines necktie or big words need apply for they cannot fill my eye” (Harriet Binford, May 11, 1860)

 “the banks have nearly all suspended and what little money a person can get is doubled and discounted.... gloom and despair seems to have over every branch of business … yesterday we had a very large meeting of the citizens of this County to have an expression of their feelings and greatly to my surprise about half were in favor of a disolution of the union and thereby destroying the fairest fabric ever reard by mortal hands and on that I consider second only to the religion we profess I consider that all that this country has suffered by all the plagues pestilence and bankrupsy as small in comparison to a disolution of this union” (Josiah Parker, November 30, 1860)

 “we are at this time just about half way between tow large contending armeys the one at Cairo numbers at this time I suppose about 30000 the one at New Madrid about 18000 and it was expected yesterday that they would meet in Misouria.... we are in daily expectation when we will have an army in this part of Kentucky perhaps and most likely at Hickman it is thought that as soon as the election is over which is tomorrow that there will be something disisive done in Kentucky I fear she has waited to long for it is now thought that she will again become the dark and bloody ground which if it should will be fearful to contemplate....”  (Josiah Parker, August 4, 1861)

Item #22562, $1,950

A Wet-Plate Glass Negative of Confederate Spy Belle Boyd

BELLE BOYD, Photographic Negative. Sized for a carte-de-visite, 2½ x 3¾ in. Matthew Brady’s Washington, D.C. Gallery, ca. mid-1860s. Archivally framed and secured in protective glass, 11 x 12½ in.

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Item #21501, $7,500

Giving South Carolina’s Governor Authority to Conduct Foreign Affairs

[SECESSION]. SOUTH CAROLINA COMMITTEE ON THE CONSTITUTION, Printed Document, “An Ordinance To amend the Constitution of the State of South Carolina, in respect to the Executive Department,” Charleston, South Carolina, [ca December 24, 1860]. 2 pp., 8¼ x 13¾ in.

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Shortly after Abraham Lincoln’s election as president in November 1860, secessionists in South Carolina demanded a convention to remove the state from the United States. South Carolina’s secession convention assembled in Columbia on December 17, 1860, but fearing an outbreak of smallpox there, they reassembled in Charleston from December 18 to January 5, 1861. On December 20, they passed a secession ordinance.

Item #24671.01, $2,000

South Carolina Reclaims Judicial and Legislative Power from the Federal Government

[SECESSION]. SOUTH CAROLINA COMMITTEE ON THE CONSTITUTION, Printed Document, “An Ordinance Concerning Judicial Powers” and “An Ordinance Concerning powers lately vested in the Congress of the United States,” Charleston, South Carolina, [ca. December 26, 1860]. 3 pp., 8¼ x 13¾ in.

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Shortly after Abraham Lincoln’s election as president in November 1860, secessionists in South Carolina demanded a convention to remove the state from the United States. South Carolina’s secession convention assembled in Columbia on December 17, 1860, but fearing an outbreak of smallpox there, they reassembled in Charleston from December 18 to January 5, 1861. On December 20, they passed a secession ordinance.

Item #24671.02, $1,500

Unusual Caricatures of Southern Aristocrats by Union Soldier on Letter to Parents

SAMUEL HYDE, Fragment of an Autograph Letter Signed, to his parents, no date [1861-1865], with his drawing of a “Suthern lady.” 2 pp.

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…the woods was ful of ded rebs

Item #21265.17, $225

Patriotic Appeal for Artillery Recruits at Beginning of Civil War

[CIVIL WAR], Artillery Recruitment Broadside, Fifth Regiment, U.S. Army, ca. 1861. 1 p., 22½ x 31 in.

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Printed by Ringwalt & Brown in Philadelphia, this recruitment poster sought men between ages 18 and 35 to enlist in twelve mounted batteries of light artillery. Touted as the “only Regiment of its kind in the service, and the last chance for those who wish to join the flying artillery,” the field officers “are men of experience in the Regular Army,” so enlistees could be certain of “doing the duty of Soldiers, under the command of Soldiers.”

Item #24672, $7,500

Union Volunteers Refreshment Saloon

[CIVIL WAR], Print. Union Volunteers Refreshment Saloon of Philadelphia. James Queen, delineator and lithographer. Philadelphia: Thomas Sinclair, 1861. In period frame, 35 x 29 in.

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Showing Union troops arriving in Philadelphia from New Jersey via ferry and marching in formation towards the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, cheered on by Philadelphians. Text at the bottom lists members of the committee and men willing to accept donations for the saloon. This image became a choice souvenir for soldiers passing through Philadelphia.

Item #22953, $3,000

Future Confederate Naval Commander

ARTHUR SINCLAIR, Autograph Letter Signed to unknown. U.S.S. Pennsylvania, Norfolk, January 22, 1861. 1 p., 7⅞ x 9¾ in.

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Three months before his home state of Virginia seceded, U.S. Naval Commander Arthur Sinclair writes to a Commander in the Navy.

Item #21767, $850

Former President John Tyler Makes a Last Attempt for Peace in 1861 – Two Months Before He Voted for Virginia Secession

JOHN TYLER, Autograph Letter Signed, to James G. Berret, written from Brown’s Indian Queen Hotel (at the corner of 6th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, where twenty years earlier, he had taken the oath of office after the death of President William Henry Harrison), February 3, 1861. 1 p., 7¼ x 9¼ in.

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In January 1861, former president John Tyler issued a call for a “Peace Conference” to resolve sectional division and avert Civil War. Here, he writes to Washington D.C. Mayor James G. Berret to thank the City Council and the Willard brothers for providing the concert hall at the Willard Hotel for the meeting. The meeting convened on February 4, 1861 with 131 representatives from fourteen free and seven slave states attended, none from the deep south. Tyler made opening remarks to the audience that included six former cabinet members, nineteen ex-governors, fourteen former senators, fifty former representatives, and twelve state Supreme Court justices. But seven southern states had already seceded, and representatives were already meeting in Montgomery to form a new Confederacy.

Item #23993.01, $5,500

Georgia Militia Incorporated
into Provisional Confederate Army

LEROY POPE WALKER, Letter Signed, as Confederate Secretary of War, to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. Montgomery, Ala., March 8, 1861. On “Confederate States of America, War Department” stationery. Docketed, “Call for Southern Rights Meeting.” 2 pp., 9⅞ x 7⅞ in.

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The Confederate Secretary of War writes the governor of Georgia asking for state militia troops and new enlistees to be transferred to the Provisional Confederate Army. This so-called P.A.C.S. was authorized by act of the Confederate Congress on February 28, 1861, a week prior to this letter. “The President, therefore, instructs me to express the hope that Your Excellency appreciating … the necessity for immediate military organization subject to the control of this Government - will tender, for the Provisional Army, the troops now in the service of your State.” The Civil War began in earnest a month later, with the Confederate capture of Fort Sumter on April 13th.

Item #21769, $4,250

Lincoln Raises the Flag

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, March 9, 1861. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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President Lincoln hoisting the 34-star American flag on Independence Hall, Philadelphia, with his speech. United States arsenal at Little Rock, Arkansas surrendered to the state troops. Interior of the new dome of the capitol at Washington. Front view of Fort Pickens, Pensacola. Inauguration of Pres. Jefferson Davis at Montgomery, Alabama.

Item #H-3-9-1861, ON HOLD
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