Seth Kaller, Inc.

Inspired by History


Browse by Category

Abraham Lincoln

African American History

Albert Einstein

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton Collection Highlights

America's Founding Documents

Books

Civil War and Reconstruction

Declaration of Independence

Early Republic (1784 - c.1830)

Finance, Stocks, and Bonds

George Washington

Gettysburg

Gilded Age (1876 - c.1900)

Great Gifts

Inauguration and State of the Union Addresses

Israel and Judaica

Maps

Pennsylvania

Presidents and Elections

Prints

Revolution and Founding Fathers (1765 - 1784)

Science, Technology, and Transportation

War of 1812

Women's History and First Ladies

World War I and II

Gilded Age (1876 - c.1900)
Gilded Age (1876 - c.1900)

Sort by:
« Back
Page of 3 (54 items) — show per page

Early Electricity and the Spread of the Telephone from the Documents of George C. Maynard

GEORGE C. MAYNARD, Archive. Journals, notebooks, notes, and related papers regarding the spread of telephone communications in the late 19th century. Nineteen items.

   More...

Item #23012, $4,500

Sherman’s “Insanity” For Saying 200,000 Men Would be Needed to Fight the Civil War

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to E.V. Smalley. St. Louis, Missouri, November 13, 1883. 3 pp., 5 x 8 in. On Sherman’s imprinted stationery. With an endorsement initialed by Smalley requesting the change be made if possible.

   More...

After having recently stepped down as Commanding General of the Army, Sherman reviews a biographical article. While explaining the story of his being labeled insane in 1861 for believing that 200,000 Union troops would be needed, he asks that Secretary of War Simon Cameron’s name be left out. Smalley published his article in the Century Magazine, January 1884.

Item #23562.07, $5,000

Ex-President Grant ALS re: Railroads & Building New Markets in Mexico for the U.S.

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Autograph Letter Signed, to [John P.] Jones. [Mexico City] [April 24, 1881]. 2 pp., 4½ x 6¾ in.

   More...

After James Garfield’s election, opposing factions of the Republican Party jockeyed to have their favorite candidates appointed to Cabinet and other patronage jobs. Garfield remained unmoved about his choices, even ignoring appeals by his own vice president, Chester Arthur. While in Mexico City, Grant criticized the sitting president’s choices in a letter sent via Nevada Senator John P. Jones. Two days after receiving the letter, Garfield wrote Grant a blistering response, stating he would appoint whom he wanted. The following day, New York Senators Conkling and Platt resigned in protest and Vice President Arthur was banished from Cabinet meetings. The Grant-Garfield controversy played out in the press for months, ending only after Garfield was assassinated in July.

Item #23291, $5,000

Theodore Roosevelt on Americanism

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Autograph Letter Signed, to Charles P. Bryan, New York, March 18, 1888. 3 pp. on one folded leaf, 4 x 6 in.

   More...

“The term American refers to what a man is, not to what his birth place was...”

Roosevelt’s essay, “Americans Past and Present and the Americanization of Foreigners,” appeared as the lead article in the second issue of the Chicago publication, America: A Journal for Americans, on April 14, 1888.  The correction Roosevelt requested in this letter was made, and the sentence appeared in print as “In the first place, ‘American,’ as a political term, has to do with what a man is, not with what his birthplace was; for many of the most honorable names in our history are those of men born outside of our limits.”

Item #24502, $5,500

Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to General Henry Cist. Washington, D.C., November 7, 1879, 12 pp., 5 x 7¾ in. On “Headquarters Army of the U.S.” stationery.

   More...

Sherman clarifies promotions of some of the Union’s most iconic generals, going back to the Civil War, and when U.S. Grant assumed the presidency and Sherman came to command the entire army.

Item #23562.04, $5,500

Mary Lincoln’s Signed Copy of The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France

MARY LINCOLN, Signed Book. “Mary Lincoln. / 1878,” in her copy of Charles Duke Yonge, The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France, 2d rev. ed. (London: Hurst and Blackett, 1877), xvi, 432 pp., 8vo. bound in tooled purple cloth boards with titled spine. A carte-de-visite portrait of Mary Lincoln has been affixed to the front free endpaper.

   More...

she bore her accumulated miseries with a serene resignation, an intrepid fortitude, a true heroism of soul, of which the history of the world does not afford a brighter example.

Item #24759, $6,000

Sherman Works to Convince his Friend’s Widow (and Soon-to-be Likely Mistress) that She Just Needs Some Lovin’

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Mrs [Mary] Audenried. St. Louis, Missouri, June 9, 1884. 8 pp octavo, On Sherman’s imprinted stationery.

   More...

Sherman trashes his wife’s devotion to the Catholic Church, discusses avoiding the great danger of being nominated to run for the presidency, and tries to convince his late chief-of-staff’s widow that she is not crazy, but simply needs a man’s company.

Item #23562.08, $6,500

William Jennings Bryan’s Second Populist Run
at the White House

[WILLIAMS JENNING BRYAN], “The Issue--1900: Liberty, Justice, Humanity.” Columbus, Ohio, Neville Williams, 1900. Chromolithograph, printed by the Strobridge Lithograph Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 20 x 30 in; edges slightly trimmed, very faint mat toning; laid down on canvas.

   More...

“No Crown of Thorns / No Cross of Gold / Equal Rights to All / Special Privileges to None”

William Jennings Bryan tried for the White House in 1896, 1900, and 1908. The leading supporter of “free silver” against the gold standard, and a champion of the “little guy” against moneyed Eastern businessmen and bankers, Bryan came closest to victory in 1896.

Item #24250, $9,000

William T. Sherman Talks Politics, Religion, and Princeton-Yale Football with a Suitor

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Five Autograph Letters Signed to Mrs. Mary Audenried, widow of Sherman’s former Chief of Staff. 18 pages, April 21, 1885 – February 8, 1887.

   More...

“Rachel went to Princeton last week. Thanksgiving Day – to witness the ball play – the day was horrid and she has been under the weather ever since having taken cold.”

Sherman, during an affair with a young widow, advises her on handling her teenage daughter: “Let her play her own game…Tell her to take her own way and you choose yours. If she becomes a nun she can do no harm and is dead to the world” while criticizing the power of the Catholic Church. He also muses about his own mortality, complains that he “shall not stay long” at his Senator-brother John’s home because “there is too much politics there to suit my taste,” and relates that his daughter caught a cold at the Yale-Princeton Thanksgiving Day football game.

Item #20856, $9,000

Frederick Douglass Encourages Writing on John Brown

FREDERICK DOUGLASS, Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C., November 28, [no year]. 1 p.

   More...

Douglass suggests to the author of a work on John Brown, the abolitionist crusader who attempted to incite a slave rebellion in Virginia in 1859, that she attempt to have her lines published in a popular magazine. “I know of no better way to have the value of your lines on John Brown tested and made available than by offering them for publication …”

Item #21439.03, $10,500

Approving Treaty Limiting Chinese Immigration - A Rarity from James Garfield’s Brief Presidency

JAMES A. GARFIELD, Partly Printed Document Signed, as President, May 9, 1881, 1 p. 8 x 10 in.

   More...

“I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to cause the Seal of the United States to be affixed to my ratification of a treaty relating to Chinese immigration into the U.S. signed at Peking Nov. 17, 1880…”

Item #24142, $12,000

Large Signed Photograph of President Chester A. Arthur

CHESTER A. ARTHUR, Signed Photo, as President, [1882], sepia, approximately 16 x 21 in., mounted on a larger-size board approximately 10½ x 24¼ in., matted and framed. Boldly signed and inscribed below the image, “To John Jameson, with sincere regard, / Chester A. Arthur.” The 3/4-length portrait shows the President standing in a heavy overcoat next to a table on which his top hat rests. The inscription is probably to John Jameson, an Amherst, Massachusetts lawyer, who was appointed postmaster in December 1876.

   More...

Item #22260, $15,000

The 15th Amendment, Guaranteeing the Freedmen the Right to Vote, Passes the Georgia General Assembly

RUFUS BROWN BULLOCK, Printed Letter Signed, as Governor of Georgia, to the Governor of New York, February 3, 1870, Atlanta, Georgia. 1 p.

   More...

Governor Rufus Bullock, a native New Yorker, informs the governor of his native state that his adopted state has ratified the 15th Amendment, shortly after New York rescinded its earlier ratification.

I have the honor to transmit herewith Joint Resolution ratifying the proposed ‘Fourteenth (sic) Constitutional Amendment’ passed by the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, February 2d, A.D. 1870.

It is ironic that this printed letter incorrectly references the “proposed Fourteenth” amendment. Like all other Confederates states except Tennessee, Georgia had initially rejected the Fourteenth Amendment in 1866, just months after President Johnson sent it to the states for consideration. The recalcitrance of southern states led Congress to impose military governments and to require former Confederate states to ratify the Amendment before they could be represented in Congress. Georgia ratified the Fourteenth Amendment on July 21, 1868, providing the final necessary vote for the amendment to go into effect. This letter clearly refers to the Fifteenth Amendment, under consideration by the states in 1869 and 1870.

Item #22489, $18,000

An Unusual Presentation Copy of
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

SAMUEL L. CLEMENS. [MARK TWAIN], Signed Book. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer’s Comrade). New York: Charles Webster, 1886. Second American edition. 8 3/8 x 6 5/8 in. With several prints, clippings, and other ephemera tipped in. Rebound at the Roycroft bindery.

   More...

“Taking the pledge will not make bad liquor good, but it will improve it”

Item #23193, $25,000
« Back
Page of 3 (54 items) — show per page