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Israel and Judaica

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Page of 2 (29 items) — show per page

Supporting “Hebrew” Soldiers’ Refusal
to Wear British Army Palestinian Insignia during WWII

[JEWISH BRIGADE], Broadside. Palestine, 1943. By “National People.” 1 p. 9 ¼ x 13⅝ in., in Hebrew.


The “struggle for the flag and symbol” in the British army.

Item #20760, $1,000

Theodor Herzl Urgently Appeals
for Funding for the 6th Zionist Congress

THEODOR HERZL, Typed Letter Signed. Vienna, June 6, 1903. 1 p., in German.


Item #20063, $3,000

Menachem Begin “Manifesto” attacking UN Resolution
to Partition Palestine into Jewish and Arab States

[IRGUN MANIFESTO], Broadside. December, 1947. 1p. 14” x 19 ¾”. In Hebrew.


Item #20758, $1,800

Haim Laskov Writes to His Future Wife during WWII

HAIM LASKOV, Autograph Letter Signed, to Shulamith Chen. Italy, Nov. 19, 1943. 2 pp. Heading in English, body in Hebrew.


“Night after night I watch (the stars) and read your regards.”

Item #20756, $400

David Ben-Gurion Apologizes for Not Writing Sooner

DAVID BEN-GURION (1886-1973), Autograph Letter Signed. March 21, 1954.


I am very sorry that I have been unable to answer you until now... The issue is of interest to me... 

Item #20151.01, $950

David Ben-Gurion Writes Regarding Eleazar Rokeach

DAVID BEN-GURION (1886-1973), Typed Letter Signed as Prime Minister. October 28, 1962. 6 x 6¾ in. On official letterhead. In Hebrew.


“My speech is already printed and I will not be able to add anything about Rokeach...”

Item #20151.02, $550

Jewish Recruitment Circular No. 7 for the British Army

DOV YOSEF. [BERNARD JOSEPH], Circular Letter Signed (Mimeographed). December 13, 1942. Jerusalem. 1 p., 8 x 12 in. In Hebrew.


Turn your fury into deeds Volunteer!”

Item #20759, $800

Theodor Herzl

THEODOR HERZL (1860-1904), Typed Letter Signed. Vienna, Austria, April 19, 1904.


Item #20029, $2,500

The earliest obtainable printing of George Washington’s Clearest Statement on Religious Freedom: “the Government of the United to bigotry no sanction...”

[GEORGE WASHINGTON. AMERICAN JUDAICA], Newspaper. Newport Mercury, September 13, 1790. Newport, Rhode Island: Henry Barber. Moses Seixas’ letter to Washington, and his response, the “Touro Synagogue letter,” both printed in full on page 1. 4 pp., 8⅛ x 13 in.


From fifteen Sephardic families who arrived in 1658, Newport’s Jewish community grew to be the largest in the colonies by the Revolutionary War. Many Jews left during the British occupation, but a significant number returned. By the time of Washington’s visit, there were approximately 300 Jews in the thriving Newport community.

On August 17, 1790, on behalf of the Congregation Kahal Kadosh Yeshuat Israel, Newport merchant and banker Moses Seixas wrote an address to welcome George Washington. Seixas’ letter (see below) welcomed Washington to Newport, and congratulated his ascendancy to the Presidency. Seixas also expressed his hopes for the new government’s success and its commitment to religious freedom, that a “government erected by the majesty of the people, a government which to bigotry gives no sanction, persecution no alliance, but generously affording to all Liberty of conscience,” would be created under the new Constitution. Seixas most likely gave Washington the letter on the morning of August 18, when other Clergy and townspeople met with Washington to express their regard for him.

Washington replied later on August 18. He thanked the community for its warm welcome, and assured the congregation that in his administration, “All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship....” He then echoed and built on Seixas’ words, “For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens, in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.

The original letter is owned by the Morris Morgenstern Foundation, and is on long-term loan to the National Museum of American Jewish History. We were honored to have appraised the original prior to its exhibit, and to have arranged several loans to the museum. Each year, members of the Touro Synagogue in Newport read the letter in a public ceremony.

The Boston Herald of Freedom first published both Seixas’ letter and Washington’s reply on September 7, 1790, followed by a Newport printing on September 9.

Washington echoed Seixas’ words, and built on them, to make his most celebrated statement on religious freedom.

Item #25029, $125,000
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