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Newspaper Belonging to John Quincy Adams Reports Transfer of the Floridas to the U.S.

[JOHN QUINCY ADAMS], Newspaper. Western Monitor, August 7, 1821. Lexington, Kentucky: William Gibbes Hunt. Issue owned by John Quincy Adams; Report on Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819. 4 pp, 14½ x 20½ in.

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This issue contains an inside page report of the U.S. taking possession of Florida from Spain under the terms of the Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819. This issue was owned by, delivered to, and read by John Quincy Adams (the “Adams” in the Adams-Onís Treaty) when Adams was the Secretary of State in the James Monroe administration. “Hon. John Q. Adams” is written in contemporary brown iron gall ink in the top blank margin on the front page, indicating that this issued was delivered to Adams while he was serving as Secretary of State.

Item #23822, $3,500

Republicans Tie Cleveland to British Interests and Tammany Corruption in this Rare Broadside from the Election of 1888

[GROVER CLEVELAND], Lithograph Broadside. “Reciprocal Trade.” [1888?], [New York?]. 1 p., 8½ x 11 in.

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This rare, perhaps unrecorded, political cartoon broadside depicts President Grover Cleveland flanked by John Bull and the Tammany Tiger. Cleveland had been an early champion of civil service reform during his first term in office, beginning in 1885. He had also advocated Free Trade, devoting the bulk of his December 1887 State of the Union Address to that subject. In this satiric illustration, Cleveland holds a document, upon which the Tiger hungrily focuses, entitled ‘Official Patronage’; John Bull holds several notes from the Bank of England. The text reads, “I place myself in the hands of my friends.” and “Peace and Plenty long shall reign, Ere these three shall meet again.

Item #24687, $750

Senator John F. Kennedy Notes For a Speech on Henry Clay, One of His Greatest Predecessors, Whom Lincoln Had Called “his beau ideal of a statesman

JOHN F. KENNEDY, Autograph Manuscript, Unsigned. Notes for a Speech Delivered on May 1, 1957. 2 pp. on two separate sheets, 5 x 8 in., undated.

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Henry Clay was an extraordinarily gifted political figure…He was a brilliant orator…whose effectiveness was heightened by extraordinary activity of an unique gift of winning the hearts of his country men.

Item #24384, $4,500

The First Facsimile of the Declaration of Independence

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, Copper plate printing, [Washington, D.C., 1818]. Facsimile drawn by Benjamin Owen Tyler (b. 1789) and engraved by Peter Maverick (1780-1831), 25 ½ x 31 ½ in., framed to 34 ½ x 40 ½ in.

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Item #25076, $35,000

Ex- President J.Q. Adams and his Secretary of the Treasury Skeptical of British Reforms: “The Gypsies are the Romancers of Beggary. The whigs are the Romancers of Liberty…

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, Autograph Letter Signed, to Richard Rush, April 17, 1831, Washington, D.C. 2 pp., 8 x 10 in. With recipient’s docketing.

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Since the commencement of the Reign of George the third, once in ten, fifteen or twenty years the whigs have obtained possession of the Government, and held it just long enough to demonstrate to the conviction of the Nation that they are utterly incompetent to the task of managing the Public Affairs.

This witty and sometimes caustic letter on the subject of democracy in the United Kingdom was written by a former American president to his former Secretary of the Treasury, both of whom had served as U.S. Minister to Great Britain. Rush found it “an amusing & pretty good letter.”

Item #25371, $6,500

Andrew Jackson Covers for His West Point Dropout Grandnephew

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Endorsement Signed with Initials, January 17, 1836. On RENÉ E. DE RUSSY, Autograph Letter Signed, to Andrew Jackson, West Point, January 12, 1836. 3 pp., 8 x 10 in.

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have all debts paid & draw on me for amount

Item #24588.05, $1,750

Andrew Jackson Dockets a Report from His Nephew on the Hermitage and Middle Tennessee Roads

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Endorsement Signed with Initials, ca January 1837. On ANDREW JACKSON DONELSON, Autograph Letter Signed, to Andrew Jackson, January 22, 1837. 4 pp., 8 x 10 in.

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Item #24588.06, $1,450

Gerald Ford, a member of the Warren Commission inscribes his book on President John F. Kennedy’s assassin and reaffirms that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone

GERALD R. FORD and JOHN R. STILES, Signed Book. Portrait of the Assassin. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1965. First edition, first printing. 508 pp., 6½ x 8½ in.

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Item #24761, $3,750

FDR Signs Souvenir Books to Raise Money for Democratic National Committee

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Signed copy of The Democratic Book 1936. Illustrated, original presentation morocco gilt, with original illustrated wrappers bound in; copy #1531 of 2500, with limitation page signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt; cover gilt stamped “Bethlehem Steel Company Library.” 384 pp., 11 ¼ x 14 ½ x 1 ⅝ in.

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President Roosevelt signed 2,500 copies of illustration of the White House, which are bound into a souvenir book of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and sold for $250 to address a campaign deficit.

Item #24881, $3,000

A New York Soldier’s Affidavit Allowing
a Proxy to Vote in the 1864 Election

[CIVIL WAR], Partially Printed Document Signed by Thomas Halligan with his X mark, countersigned by John G. Brown, and Seneca Warner Jr. Petersburg, Virginia, October 21, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 12½ in. With printed envelope restating affidavit’s claim on the outside, and additional affidavit of “Unregistered Soldier’s Voucher.”

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Item #21264.06, $375

A New York Soldier’s Affidavit Allowing
a Proxy to Vote in the 1864 Election

[CIVIL WAR], Partially Printed Document Signed by James M. Smith, countersigned by Jerome B. Parmenter, and Captain Joseph H. Allen. Richmond, Virginia, October 18, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 12½ in. With printed envelope restating affidavit’s claim on the outside.

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Item #21264.05, $375

1858 Student Banner Supporting Douglas in Lincoln Douglas Debate at Knox College

[LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATES], Campaign Banner Presented by the Democratic Students of Lombard University to Stephen A. Douglas before Galesburg Debate at Knox College, October 7, 1858. 28 x 28 in.

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This incredibly rare silk and wool banner consisting of two panels with a horizontal seam across the middle has an embroidered woolen wreath around the inscription in red ink, “From the Democracy / of / Lombard University / to / Stephen A. Douglas.” This banner joins the Kansas State Historical Society’s Lincoln banner as one of only two known “debate trophies” specifically tied to one of the participants.

Item #24949, $60,000

Andrew Jackson Reminds Himself to Answer a Letter from a Bereaved Friend

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Endorsement Signed with Initials, September 1, 1833. On MARGARET D. ARMSTRONG. Autograph Letter Signed, to Andrew Jackson, August 17, 1833. 4 pp., 8 x 9¾ in.

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Item #24588.02, $1,500

Franklin Roosevelt Combats Anti-Catholicism in 1928 Presidential Election

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to William H. Higgs, on “Democratic National Committee” stationery, New York, September 1, 1928. 1 p.

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It is an interesting fact that about 95% of the opposition to him in Democratic circles is due to the religious issue and not in the final analysis to prohibition or any other political issue before the American public...

Roosevelt challenges a long-time Democratic campaigner to consider whether his preference for Republican Herbert Hoover is due to a prejudice against Alfred E. Smith’s Catholicism.

Item #24491, $2,750

Herbert Hoover - Rare Signed Inaugural Address

HERBERT HOOVER, Printed Document Signed, March 4, 1929. A rare large-print copy of his inaugural address. 21 pp., 9 x 12 in.

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We have emerged from the losses of the Great War and the reconstruction following it with increased virility and strength. From this strength we have contributed to the recovery and progress of the world. What America has done has given renewed hope and courage to all who have faith in government by the people.

Item #24848, $2,750

Herbert Hoover Drafts Note, and Fredtjof Nansen Sends Letter to Vladimir Lenin, Trying to Get Lenin to Accept Food Aid for Starving Russians During the Russian Civil War

HERBERT HOOVER, Autograph Note, undated [April, 1919]. Cover sheet: “Draft note (undated) / Dr. Nansen to Lenin in / Mr. Hoover’s handwriting.” 1 p., 8¼ x 10½ in. #24849 With FRIDTJOF NANSEN, Typed Letter Signed, to VLADIMIR LENIN, Paris, France, April 17, 1919. 4 pp., 8¼ x 10¾ in. This compound letter includes Nansen’s proposal for Russian relief to the Big Four allied leaders, their response, and his proposal to Lenin. It is a remarkable compilation of the prospects for and obstacles to efforts to ease Russian suffering.

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The Government and peoples whom we represent would be glad to cooperate, without thought of political, military or financial advantage, in any proposal which would relieve this situation in Russia.

To combat starvation in Europe during World War I, President Woodrow Wilson created the United States Food Administration by executive order. Under the direction of Herbert Hoover, it became one of the most efficient and successful governmental initiatives in American history. More than 5 million Russians died of starvation before food aid was allowed in 1921.

Item #24850, $8,500

John Quincy Adams Scathing Anti-Masonic Letter After the Murder of a Prominent Anti-Mason Who Threatened to Reveal their Secrets

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, Autograph Letter Signed as Congressman, to Stephen Bates. Washington, D.C., April 1, 1833. 3 pp. 8 x 9¾ in.

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“To all members of the Masonic fraternity, who entered it before the murder of Morgan I would extend the most liberal Toleration. Most of them took the Oaths without reflecting upon what they imported….Now the case is otherwise. How they can now take or administer the cutthroat Oath to keep Secret, what all the world knows, I cannot comprehend.”

In the wake of the murder of William Morgan, a prominent anti-Mason who had threatened to reveal the society’s secrets, John Quincy Adams requested the return of an old letter. Considering the political climate, Adams thought the letter would reflect poorly on its now-deceased recipient, as well as expose Adams, a prominent opponent of Freemasonry, to public criticism for having supported a man he knew to be of good character who also happened to be a Mason. The former president, now in Congress, goes on to explain his political support for anti-Masonry, one of the first third-party political movements in the United States.

Item #23716, $19,000

Ronald Reagan — The Great Communicator — Shares His Love of Horses with a Little Girl Who Wants One

RONALD REAGAN, Autograph Letter Signed with Initials, to Carol ?, ca. 1967-1975. 2 pp., 6 x 9 in.

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Horses have been a large part of my life and I love them as much as you do…. Being a father myself I know how very much your father would like to be able to help you realize your dream but sometimes we have to wait for the good things. If it will help to know this I didn’t have a horse of my own until after I was grown up. You’ll do better than that so keep on riding & studying….

Item #24844, $2,200

Rare same day broadside of John Adams’ Fourth State of the Union Address: Opening Washington D.C. as the Nation’s Capital

[JOHN ADAMS], Broadside, Supplement to the National Intelligencer. [Washington: Samuel Harrison Smith, November 22, 1800].

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Adams’ historic fourth Annual Message to Congress—now known as the State of the Union Address—announces the establishment of the District of Columbia as the nation’s capital. The second President, who had just been defeated for re-election, optimistically discusses unprecedented economic growth, considers the recently consummated treaty of amity and commerce with Prussia, and focuses on the need for expanded naval forces and coastal fortifications, which he believes to be necessary given the Quasi-War with France.

A rare broadside extra edition: no institutional copies are listed in OCLC, although it is possible they exist in uncatalogued runs. The National Intelligencer, then in its second month in print, had moved to Washington at the behest of President-elect Thomas Jefferson.

Item #30028.06, $8,500

The Border Ruffian Code in Kansas

[BLEEDING KANSAS], Pamphlet. The Border Ruffian Code in Kansas. [New York: Tribune Office. 1856.] 15, [1] pp. Concludes with full page (8.75 x 5.75 in.) map, “Freedom and Slavery, and the Coveted Territories.”

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This tract provides an example of the laws “notoriously forced upon the people of that Territory, at the hands of invading ruffians from Missouri, using the persuasive arguments of the Bowie-Knife and Revolver....” Included are the three Presidential platforms for the 1856 election, and a special map: “Freedom and Slavery, and the Coveted Territories,” printed on the last page.

Item #23739.03, $150
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