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Presidents and Elections

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Iconic Anti-Prohibition License Plate from 1932 Presidential Campaign

[PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS AND CAMPAIGNS]. FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT. JOHN NANCE GARNER, Metal license plate with beer mug. 9⅝ x 4⅝ in.

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Item #25139, $6,500

Herbert Hoover - Rare Signed Inaugural Address

HERBERT HOOVER, Printed Document Signed, March 4, 1929. A rare large-print copy of his inaugural address. 21 pp., 9 x 12 in.

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We have emerged from the losses of the Great War and the reconstruction following it with increased virility and strength. From this strength we have contributed to the recovery and progress of the world. What America has done has given renewed hope and courage to all who have faith in government by the people.

Item #24848, $2,750

Franklin Roosevelt Combats Anti-Catholicism in 1928 Presidential Election

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to William H. Higgs, on “Democratic National Committee” stationery, New York, September 1, 1928. 1 p.

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It is an interesting fact that about 95% of the opposition to him in Democratic circles is due to the religious issue and not in the final analysis to prohibition or any other political issue before the American public...

Roosevelt challenges a long-time Democratic campaigner to consider whether his preference for Republican Herbert Hoover is due to a prejudice against Alfred E. Smith’s Catholicism.

Item #24491, $2,750

Franklin Roosevelt Orders Books on Naval Battles, New York, and Ladies

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Autograph Notes filling out bookseller’s printed postcard order form, October 28, 1924, 1 p.

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Both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt were avid readers. With this postcard, the future president orders three books from Pierce & Scopes, Booksellers and Importers, in Albany, New York.

Item #24496, $1,250

Harding’s Return to Normalcy – and Isolationism – after World War I

WARREN G. HARDING, Typed Letter Signed as President, to Senator Joseph Medill McCormick, Washington, D. C., August 29, 1921. With autograph emendations in two different secretarial hands. 8 pp.

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Key political circular from the first-year Republican President written to influence off-year elections in New Mexico and other places. Harding justifies, and praises, the rapid postwar dismantling of America’s military by Congress, while backhandedly criticizing the inattention of his predecessor – Woodrow Wilson – to the peacetime transition. “Vast expenditure without proper consideration for results, is the inevitable fruit of war.”

Item #21124, $2,600

Herbert Hoover Drafts Note, and Fredtjof Nansen Sends Letter to Vladimir Lenin, Trying to Get Lenin to Accept Food Aid for Starving Russians During the Russian Civil War

HERBERT HOOVER, Autograph Note, undated [April, 1919]. Cover sheet: “Draft note (undated) / Dr. Nansen to Lenin in / Mr. Hoover’s handwriting.” 1 p., 8¼ x 10½ in. #24849 With FRIDTJOF NANSEN, Typed Letter Signed, to VLADIMIR LENIN, Paris, France, April 17, 1919. 4 pp., 8¼ x 10¾ in. This compound letter includes Nansen’s proposal for Russian relief to the Big Four allied leaders, their response, and his proposal to Lenin. It is a remarkable compilation of the prospects for and obstacles to efforts to ease Russian suffering.

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The Government and peoples whom we represent would be glad to cooperate, without thought of political, military or financial advantage, in any proposal which would relieve this situation in Russia.

To combat starvation in Europe during World War I, President Woodrow Wilson created the United States Food Administration by executive order. Under the direction of Herbert Hoover, it became one of the most efficient and successful governmental initiatives in American history. More than 5 million Russians died of starvation before food aid was allowed in 1921.

Item #24850, $8,500

Woodrow Wilson Protests the Sinking of Lusitania & Threatens to Break Diplomatic Relations – About a Year Before America Enters WW I

WOODROW WILSON, Signed Pamphlet. Address of the President of the United States Delivered at a Joint Session of the Two Houses of Congress, April 19, 1916.Washington, D.C., ca April 19, 1916. Bound in blue cloth boards with titled spine with several blank leaves. Spine cracked but binding intact, very minor marginal tear to title page, other pages lightly toned with a light vertical crease but clean overall. 7 pp., 5¾ x 9 in.

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Item #24100, $2,500

Theodore Roosevelt Commissions a Captain

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Document Signed as President. Commission for John J.A. Clark as Captain in the Philippine Scouts. Washington, D.C., September 19, 1908. 1 p., 21 x 16 in.

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Item #22949, $1,500

Racist, Anti Roosevelt Drawing and Note

RACISM. [THEODORE ROOSEVELT], Drawing. 1p, 5 x 6¼ in.

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Item #22331, $2,500

Republicans Tie Cleveland to British Interests and Tammany Corruption in this Rare Broadside from the Election of 1888

[GROVER CLEVELAND], Lithograph Broadside. “Reciprocal Trade.” [1888?], [New York?]. 1 p., 8½ x 11 in.

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This rare, perhaps unrecorded, political cartoon broadside depicts President Grover Cleveland flanked by John Bull and the Tammany Tiger. Cleveland had been an early champion of civil service reform during his first term in office, beginning in 1885. He had also advocated Free Trade, devoting the bulk of his December 1887 State of the Union Address to that subject. In this satiric illustration, Cleveland holds a document, upon which the Tiger hungrily focuses, entitled ‘Official Patronage’; John Bull holds several notes from the Bank of England. The text reads, “I place myself in the hands of my friends.” and “Peace and Plenty long shall reign, Ere these three shall meet again.

Item #24687, $750

Discontent with Gilded Age Presidential Politics
and the Influence of “the negro vote”

WILLIAM BEACH LAWRENCE, Autograph Letter Signed, to Henry Anthony. Newport [R.I.], November 25, 1872. 4 pp.

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A detailed, despairing letter on campaign politics after the reelection of Ulysses S. Grant. Lawrence observes the humiliating defeat of Democrats and “Liberal Republicans” – who united behind Horace Greeley because of corruption in the Grant administration – in the Election of 1872. Lawrence laments the elevation of personality over merit and virtue in elections, an observation which resonates today. He also expresses concern about how newly enfranchised African Americans tended to vote.  “The negroes are naturally disposed to support those who are in power & whom they invest with superior dignity, on account of the possession of power. …the extraordinary denouement of the Cincinnati Convention has placed in bold relief the mode most unsatisfactory to an intelligent people, by which party conventions are constituted & which are readily made, the instruments of the vilest partisan combinations, carried on by men without character & without principle.

Item #20020, $950

Pierce Urges His Young Nephew Studying at Princeton:
“Do Not for a Day Relax Your Labor”

FRANKLIN PIERCE, Autograph Letter Signed to Frank H. Pierce, his nephew. Concord, N.H., September 6, 1866. 2 pp.

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Former President Franklin Pierce worries that young Frank Pierce – like most undergraduates – is occupying himself with things other than his studies at Princeton.

Item #21116, $4,500

1860’s Cartoon Critical of Andrew Johnson’s
Southern Sympathies

[ANDREW JOHNSON], Broadside, “Ho! For the Salty Styx!”. With image of Andrew Johnson piloting a boat named “Accidental President,” with text beneath “Grand Excursion of the A n d y - J o h n s o n - Cooperhead-Reb-B & B Club.” [Philadelphia], Ca. 1865. 5 x 4¼ in.

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Item #20506, $265

1865 General Orders,
Including Many Regarding Lincoln’s Assassination

[CIVIL WAR - WAR DEPARTMENT], Book. Bound collection of separately printed General Orders from the Adjutant General’s office for 1865. Containing 168 of 175 consecutive orders, and a 94-page index at front. Bound for Major General William Scott Ketchum, with his name in gilt on the spine and his markings or wartime notes on numerous pages. 4¾ x 7 in.

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Item #22265, $5,550
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Lincoln’s Final State of the Union Message, 1864

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Observer, New York, N.Y.: Sidney E. Morse and Richard C. Morse. December 8, 1864. Includes complete printing of Lincoln’s last annual message to Congress. 8 pp. (385-392), 18¼ x 25 in.

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In his fourth and final State of the Union address to Congress, President Lincoln reaffirms his commitment both to restoring the Union through military victory and his determination to see the end of slavery in the United States. After briefly addressing foreign affairs and inviting Congressional attention to the reports of his Cabinet officers, Lincoln notes that “The war continues.” He expresses pleasure at the steady advance of Union forces, allowing many occupied areas to grow crops, and admires the confidence of the Union forces illustrated by General William T. Sherman’s march through Georgia, then underway.

The President draws several lessons from the 1864 national elections recently completed. First, he believes the election demonstrates a unanimous and unshakeable commitment to restoring the Union. Second, he finds hope because the human and natural resources of the Union are both “unexhausted” and “inexhaustible.” Seeing immigration as a “replenishing stream,” Lincoln looks forward to a future when Atlantic and Pacific states are connected by “railways and telegraph lines.” Third, he sees a growing commitment to emancipation.

Therefore, he urges the House of Representatives to pass the proposed Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, even before the next Congress takes office. Lincoln remains committed to emancipation and the destruction of slavery, even while offering lenient pardon to those rebels willing to return to their allegiance to the Union, either individually or collectively.

Item #30001.23, $500

A New York Soldier’s Affidavit Allowing
a Proxy to Vote in the 1864 Election

[CIVIL WAR], Partially Printed Document Signed by Thomas Halligan with his X mark, countersigned by John G. Brown, and Seneca Warner Jr. Petersburg, Virginia, October 21, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 12½ in. With printed envelope restating affidavit’s claim on the outside, and additional affidavit of “Unregistered Soldier’s Voucher.”

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Item #21264.06, $375

A New York Soldier’s Affidavit Allowing
a Proxy to Vote in the 1864 Election

[CIVIL WAR], Partially Printed Document Signed by James M. Smith, countersigned by Jerome B. Parmenter, and Captain Joseph H. Allen. Richmond, Virginia, October 18, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 12½ in. With printed envelope restating affidavit’s claim on the outside.

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Item #21264.05, $375

Taking the Copper-Heads to Task in 1864:
“Another Rebel Raid (on the Ballot Box)
repulsed with great slaughter…”

[ELECTION OF 1864], Printed Card. “How are you Copperhead?/ The Peace Democrat for the Salt River” card, adding, “Another Rebel Raid (on the Ballot Box) repulsed with great slaughter, Oct. 11th 1864.” 3¼ x 2¼ in.

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Item #20502.02, $265

Rare Lincoln 1864 Presidential Campaign Newspaper

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Newspaper. Father Abraham. Reading, PA: October 4, 1864. Vol 1, No 10. 4 pp., 17¾ x 11¾ in.

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Item #23426, $1,250

Lincoln Prepares the Union Army to Vote
in the Election of 1864

SETH WILLIAMS. [ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Letter Signed to Richard N. Batchelder. “Head Qrs Army of the Potomac,” September 1, 1864.

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Written just two months before the 1864 presidential election, Lincoln was banking on votes of soldier to secure his re-election.

Item #22952, $950
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