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Presidents and Elections

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Anti-Jackson Broadside in Highly Contested
1828 Presidential Election

ANDREW JACKSON, Broadside. A Brief Account of Some of the Bloody Deeds of General Jackson, Philadelphia?, 1828. 15¼ x 21 in. 1 p.

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Item #21417.99, $7,500

Franklin D. Roosevelt’s First Inaugural Program - Given to the Wife of His Vice President

[JOHN NANCE GARNER. FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT], “Official Program of the Inaugural Ceremonies Inducting into office Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States, John N. Garner, Vice President of the United States, March 4, 1933.” Presentation copy with gold embossed inscription to Mrs. John N. Garner (whose biography appears on page 21). Washington DC: Ransdell Incorporated, 1933. First Edition. Quarto, deluxe flexible leatherette binding, gold embossed with title and presidential seal. Copy 17 Signed by Cary T. Grayson, Chairman, General Inaugural Committee, and inscribed by the program committee chair: “To the Vice President-elect with/the affectionate regard of J. Fred Essary.” Scarce edition given as gifts to distinguished guests. Fine.

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Item #24114, $1,750

Governor Ronald Reagan Opposes Withholding of State Income Tax

RONALD REAGAN, Autograph Letter Signed as governor of California, to Mary Boatman, June 2, 1967. 1 p. 8 x 10 in. Address penned by secretary, and then letter penned by Reagan.

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The poll this time was most interesting, particularly on 'Withholding.' This is the one area I feel it's necessary to hold out even if the poll is against me. Withholding may make it easier to pretend you aren't being taxed but it's also easier for govt. to raise taxes without getting a protest from the people....

Item #24387, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures

BENJAMIN OWEN TYLER, Broadside, Drawn by Tyler and engraved by Peter Maverick, [Washington, D.C., 1818]. 1 p., 23⅞ x 31 in., archivally framed to approx. 32 x 40 in.

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“In Congress, July 4th 1776. The Unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America.”

Item #23683, $29,000

Theodore Roosevelt Advocates American Entry into World War I and Revisits His Foreign Policy Maxim:
“Speak softly and Carry a big stick”

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Printed proof sheets sent to TR for his approval, of his “Address Delivered to the Illinois State Bar Association,” delivered at the Hotel La Salle in Chicago on April 29, 1916. Returned with more than 42 penciled corrections in his hand and Roosevelt’s Autograph Inscription Signed at top of the first page: “Dear Mr. McCh’ny, [Nathan MacChesney, President of the Illinois Bar Association] Here is the speech, with a few merely verbal corrections, sincerely, Theodore Roosevelt.” 8 pp., 7 x 24 in. The speech, as edited here, was printed in The Proceedings of the Illinois State Bar Association (Chicago Legal News Co., 1916), 761-84.

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Roosevelt called for national preparedness considering the world situation, referencing Pancho Villa and Mexico, Germany and the war in Europe, and the sinking of the Lusitania. In this address nearly a year prior to the United States’ entry into World War I, Roosevelt made his opinion clear about the cost of isolationism: “The result of our inaction, of our sloth and timidity, has been that every nation in the world now realizes our weakness and that no nation in the world really believes either in our disinterestedness or our manliness.

Theodore Roosevelt’s first known use of his “big stick” philosophy was in a January 26, 1900 letter as governor of New York. Writing to Assemblyman Henry L. Sprague, Roosevelt credited the West African proverb as pivotal to his success in New York politics. During his presidency, from 1901-1908, it was a central tenet of his policies. We had the honor of selling the original 1900 letter a few years ago. This 1916 speech is only the second time we’ve seen in the market a Roosevelt signed document with the text of this most famous saying.

Item #24383, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Registration for FDR’s Customized
1936 Ford Phaeton—Signed as President

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Document Signed as President.

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Roosevelt’s Ford Phaeton was customized with special hand controls that allowed the polio-stricken president to drive under his own power without using his legs. The car is now at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library and Museum.

Item #24243, ON HOLD

Former President and Future Confederate Supporter John Tyler Forcefully Defends the Fugitive Slave Act and the “Southern Cause,” Attacks the NY Press, and Plays up His Own Service in the War of 1812

JOHN TYLER, Autograph Letter Signed and Autograph Manuscript Signed several times in the third person. Sent to S. Cunningham, from Sherwood Forest, October 12, 1850, 1 p., 9⅜ x 7¼ in. on blue paper marked “Private,” being the cover letter for the manuscript, written for anonymous publication: “The fugitive slave bill and Commissioner Gardiner,” [ca. October 12, 1850], 2 pp., 9⅜ x 7⅞ in. on blue paper.

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In the first fugitive slave law case, which came before his cousin Commissioner Gardiner: “The fugitive was promptly dealt by and restored to his owner in Baltimore. Mr. Gardiner has proven himself to be a faithful public servant, an honest man, and a Patriot. And yet, by a certain class of Editors in New York he is sneered at…

Tyler criticizes two NY editors in particular: “Now what jackasses are Mssrs Herricks and Ropes… These would-be somethingarians [a colloquialism, usually used as an insult] in the first place, deem it a matter of censure in a judge, to execute the law—and, in the next they show their ignorance … by ascribing to Mr. Tyler under their witty soubriquet of Captain (a title he is well content to wear since he enjoyed it during the war of 1812 with Great Britain)…

Item #24043, $24,000

Harry Truman Supports FDR’s Plan to Pack the Supreme Court (SOLD)

HARRY S. TRUMAN, Mimeographed typed manuscript signed “Harry S. Truman, U.S.S. Mo.,” six pages, 8.5 x 14, April 1937. “Speech Delivered at Kansas City, Missouri, April 19, 1937, by Senator Harry S. Truman.” He traces the history of the Court’s influence in blocking progressive legislation, and discusses the changing number of Justices, which ranged from six in 1789 to ten in 1863, to nine in 1869.

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“the Court is packed now, and has been for fifty years, against progressive legislation…. The country will be just as safe, the Constitution just as strong, and the Republic just as great… [if we] let the privileges of our Government be for the whole people and not for just a favored few.”

Item #24121, SOLD — please inquire about other items

George Washington Signed Ship’s Passport (SOLD)

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Partially Printed Document Signed as President, counter-signed by Secretary of State Timothy Pickering and Customs District Collector Francis Cook. New York, N.Y. and Wiscasset, Maine, November 12, 1796. 1 p., folio, with paper Great Seal of the United States. Strong, large Washington and Pickering signatures.

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A three-language ship’s passport, in French, English and Dutch, for Captain Spencer Tinkham of the Astrea, out of Wiscasset, Maine bound for Liverpool. The Astrea was pictured on a Liverpool Jug, likely right after this voyage. It was lost at sea six years later.

Item #23998, SOLD — please inquire about other items

AN EXTRAORDINARY RARITY!
Leaves From George Washington’s Own Draft of His First Inaugural Address

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Autograph Manuscript, Pages 27-28, 35-36, and 47-48 of Washington's own draft of his undelivered inaugural address. [written ca. January 1789]. 6 pp. on 3 leaves, 7 x 9 in.

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“This Constitution, is really in its formation a government of the people”

George Washington understood that the new government’s success, as had the Constitutional Convention’s, rested squarely on his shoulders. He also knew that everything he did as the first president would set precedents for future generations. He wrote privately about the promise, ambiguity, and tension of high office, and these same themes are woven throughout his original, undelivered inaugural address. Would the government work as intended, or suffer death from a thousand cuts? Still, the former Commander in Chief recognized the nation’s potential, as well as the honorable men who had come together to build the Constitution.

The three unique leaves—six pages—offered here are written entirely in Washington’s hand. They include assertions that government power is derived from the people, and a highly significant section of the Address explicitly arguing that the Constitution is subject to amendment and, by implication, advocating the adoption of the Bill of Rights. They also include the oratorical climax of the address—arguably the most visionary and impassioned passage of the address.

Item #24818, PRICE ON REQUEST

Eisenhower Signed D-Day Message (SOLD)

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, Broadside Signed in dark blue ink. Statement to the soldiers, sailors and airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force on June 6, 1944. Document is approx. 5¾ x 9½ in.; archivally framed to 22 x 14½ in.

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From a limited edition of Eisenhower’s Crusade in Europe, (New York: Doubleday & Co., 1948), limited to 1,426 copies. The war had ended only three years earlier, and Eisenhower must have been looking towards politics - he was elected to the Presidency in 1952.

Item #24031, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Claims that First Republican Presidential Candidate is Foreign Born & Ineligible

[STEPHEN H. BRANCH], Broadside. Important! to the Public ... The Republican Candidate for the Presidency, John C. Fremont, of Foreign Birth. Ogdensburgh, N.Y. October 31, 1856. 1 p. 10½ x 7½ in. Foxing, some paper remnants on verso.

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Item #23425, $3,500

FDR Presidential Salary Check, with His Signed Endorsement (SOLD)

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Printed check signed on endorsement line on verso (“Franklin D. Roosevelt”), Washington, D. C., February 29, 1936. 1 p., with engraving of Treasury Dept. seal at left. A Presidential monthly salary check from FDR’s first term, for $6,250. Notation above Roosevelt’s signature, “Pay to order of Guaranty Trust Co.,” written by FDR’s secretary, Missy LeHand.

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Item #23808, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Congress for Compensating Court Officers, Jurors, and Witnesses

FIRST CONGRESS. [THOMAS JEFFERSON], Printed Document Signed as Secretary of State. An Act providing compensations for the officers of the Judicial Courts of the United States, and for Jurors and Witnesses, and for other purposes. New York, N.Y., March 3, 1791. Signed in type by George Washington as President, Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg as Speaker of the House of Representatives, and John Adams as Vice President, and president of the Senate. 2 pp., 9 x 15 in.

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Under the new federal Constitution, the First Congress had the momentous job of creating the laws to govern the various branches of the new government, whether setting up the framework for executive departments such as Treasury and State, establishing its own rules and schedule, or, in this case, creating a federal court system. In its second session (January 4, 1790 through August 12, 1790) Congress passed the Crimes Act, which defined a plethora of federal crimes, punishments, and court procedures. Here in the third session, the Congress provides a schedule of compensation for officers and jurors, as well as a process for scheduling and meeting places for the various federal district courts around the new nation.

Item #26175.99, $16,500

William Henry Harrison as Presidential Candidate Determined “to Make no Pledges” - While Affirming His Anti-Masonic Position

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, Autograph Letter Signed, to William Ayres. Cincinnati, Ohio, November 25, 1835. 4 pp., 7½ x 12 in.

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“I set out with a determination to make no pledges – If the Anti Masons rely upon my openly avowed opinions against Masonry one would suppose that they ought to be satisfied with the certainty of their having a full proportion of my confidences.”

Future U.S. President William Henry Harrison demonstrates exceptional political acumen by revealing his credo not to make pledges, and is keenly aware that his actions to get nominated may be used against him in the actual campaign. Harrison also resents that Anti-Masonic leader Thaddeus Stevens, is “determined to support [Daniel] Webster under any circumstances or any person but any old Jeffersonian Democrat like myself.

Item #22520.99, $24,000

Harry Truman’s Notebook for Kansas City Law School
Night Classes (SOLD)

HARRY S. TRUMAN, Autograph Manuscript Notebook, [Kansas City, Missouri, ca. November 20, 1924–January 29, 1925]. 48 leaves, in pen and pencil, on a removable pad of no. 2 memo paper, inserted in a limp mottled brown leather binder, the front cover gilt with the logo of the Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Co. and gilt-lettered “Things to do Today” and “Harry S. Truman.” The front pastedown is stamped with the name of Phoenix Mutual representative Edwin H. Green. 5 x 3 in. In maroon buckram folding case.

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“Section I must be learned in detail and as a whole… learn by heart”

Item #23833, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Anti-Catholic “Test Oath” Signed by George Washington – as Required to Validate his Military Commission as Lieutenant Colonel at the Outset of the French and Indian War

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Manuscript Document Signed, [March 19, 1754]. With signatures of more than a dozen others, dating from Feb. 3, 1754 to Aug. 19, 1755. John West, Jr. and James Towers, whose signatures immediately follow Washington’s, subscribed on the same day, and, along with several other signers, served with Washington in the 1754 campaign. The subscribers, all Fairfax County, Va. public officials and militiamen, signed starting on the right side of the paper; a second column was then added to the left.

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“there is no Transubstantiation in the sacrament of the Lords supper or in the elements of Bread and wine...”

On March 15, 1754, Governor Robert Dinwiddie enclosed Washington’s commission as lieutenant colonel of the Virginia regiment in a letter directing the young officer and his men to the Ohio Valley to help defend against approaching French forces. Four days later, Washington signed this “test oath” – required of all Virginia civil and military officers – validating his commission. He would soon find himself at the center of a battle that ignited war between Britain and France, and a defeat that led him to sign the only surrender of his entire career.

Ironically, Washington’s signature on this document launched the military and political career that eventually proved instrumental in expanding the religious freedoms that this oath sought to restrict.

Note that we have agreed to steer this to a philanthropic individual, foundation or company willing to acquire and donate this to George Washington’s Mount Vernon or the Fairfax County Circuit Court Archives. Details on request.

Item #23200, PRICE ON REQUEST

Teddy Roosevelt Invites Head of the A.M.A. to First “Conference on the Conservation of Natural Resources” (SOLD)

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed as President, to Joseph D. Bryant, president of the American Medical Association, Washington, D.C., March 14, 1908. 2 pp., 7 x 9 in., On White House letterhead. With Bryant’s draft of his acceptance letter, noting the medical community’s agreement that protecting the environment is “essential to human life and prosperity.”

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“the conference ought to rank among the more important meetings in the history of the country... practically all of the Governors...will attend the conference...Senators and Representatives... Justices of the Supreme Court, and the members of the Cabinet have also been invited to take part...” 

Item #23753, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Compensated Emancipation Proposal

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, Pa., March 7, 1862. 8 pp., 15½ x 20½ in. With “Message from the President...Resolved, That the United States ought to co-operate with any State which may adopt gradual abolition of slavery.” [Printing Lincoln’s March 5 message to Congress on page 1.]

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The United States is the only nation in history to end slavery through Civil War. Nations as diverse as Russia, the British Empire, France, Brazil, and others around the world ended their reliance on slave labor through legislative means that included some form of compensation to slave owners for their lost “assets.” Here, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports on the front page that Lincoln presented a special message to Congress with a plan to end slavery through compensation. There would be no takers among the slaveholding border states.

Item #30001.28, SOLD — please inquire about other items

William Taft Criticizes Wilson on World War I Preparedness (SOLD)

WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT, Typed Letter Signed, to Gus J. Karger. March 4, 1918. 3 pp., 8 x 10 ½ in. On Taft’s personal letterhead.

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“We ought now to be making plans for an army of 5,000,000 men. That would give us 2,000,000 or 2,500,000 fighting men on the front. Somebody said that we haven’t any ships to carry them. Well, that is true. We must build them. We will not get them unless we prepare for this war as if it was a real big job of years instead of one to be ended through the sweet, forward-looking sentences of our stylist President.”

Item #23669, SOLD — please inquire about other items
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