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Prints

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Paul Revere’s Iconic Boston Massacre Print

PAUL REVERE, Engraving. “The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston on March 5th 1770 by a party of the 29th Reg.” Printed by Edes & Gill, Boston, Mass., 1770. First edition, second state (clock showing 10:20), original hand coloring. 1 p., LVG watermark, 9⅝ x 12 in.

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Revere’s print quickly became one of the most successful examples of political propaganda of all time. The depiction of the event, and a poem printed below, vilify the British Army and list the first casualties of the American Revolution: “Unhappy Boston! see thy Sons deplore, Thy hallow’d Walks besmear’d with guiltless Gore...The unhappy Sufferers were Mess[ieur]s Saml Gray, Saml Maverick, Jams Caldwell, Crispus Attucks & Pat[ric]K Carr Killed. Six wounded; two of them (Christr Monk & John Clark) Mortally...” Rushed into print less than a month after the event, Revere’s print helped unite the colonists and, in American minds, cast the British as aggressive oppressors— making rebellion easier to justify.

Item #25697, PRICE ON REQUEST

“John Bull and the Baltimoreans” Lampooning British Defeat at Fort McHenry in Baltimore Following their Earlier Success at Alexandria

[WAR OF 1812]. WILLIAM CHARLES, Print. John Bull and the Baltimoreans. Satirical engraved aquatint cartoon. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [October, 1814]. 1 p., 12½ x 9 in.

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Mercy! mercy on me. What fellows those Baltimoreans are. After the example of the Alexandrians I thought I had nothing to do but enter the Town and carry off the Booty. And here is nothing but Defeat and Disgrace!!

A masterpiece of design and composition.

Item #25448, $4,500

“Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians” War of 1812 Cartoon Ridiculing Alexandria’s Surrender without a Fight

[WAR OF 1812]. WILLIAM CHARLES, Print. Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians, satirical engraved aquatint cartoon. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [October, 1814]. 1 p., 13 x 9 in.

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Push on Jack, the yankeys are not all so Cowardly as these Fellows here. let’s make the best of our time.

This cartoon mocks the citizens of Alexandria, who easily capitulated to a small British fleet in August 1814. As part of the terms of surrender, John Bull, dressed as a sailor with a sword in one hand and “Terms of Capitulation” in the other, confiscates their property.

Williams Charles’ images were based loosely on Thomas Rowlandson’s 1798 satire, “High Fun for John Bull or the Republicans Put to Their last Shift.”

Item #25449, $3,750

“John Bull Making A New Batch of Ships to send to the Lakes” – a Scottish-born American Illustrator Satirizes British Losses on Great Lakes and Lake Champlain

[WAR OF 1812]. WILLIAM CHARLES, Print. John Bull making a new Batch of Ships to send to the Lakes, engraved satirical aquatint cartoon. Philadelphia, [October, 1814]. 1 p., 12¾ x 9¼ in. Excellent condition.

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Oliver Hazard Perry’s victory in the Battle of Lake Erie caused the loss of the British fleet there in September, 1813. Then, in September 1814, Thomas Macdonough’s victory at the Battle of Plattsburgh on Lake Champlain caused the British, with French Canadian allies and financiers, and British arms makers, to fear that the Yankees might take Canada next. This beautifully colored print by William Charles shows King George III frantically baking more ships to replace those lost to American victories on the Great Lakes. It is a companion to John Bull and the Baltimoreans and Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians.

Item #25451, $3,500

“The Night Before Christmas”:
First Separate Printing Crediting the Author

CLEMENT CLARKE MOORE, “Christmas Carol. The Visit of Saint Nicholas. Written by Prof. C. C. Moore.” Broadside, text printed in blue with red border of ivy entwined branches. Philadelphia: Issued by John M. Wolff, Stationer [ca 1842-1865]. 11 x 17 ¼ in.

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Item #23966, $3,900

New York Assembly Print of Proposed State Law to Combat the Dred Scott Decision

[SLAVERY AND ABOLITION--NEW YORK STATE], Print. New York Assembly. “An Act To secure Freedom to all persons within this State,” Samuel A. Foot, April 9, 1857, Printed with numbered lines for the use of the Assembly and not for public distribution. 1 p.

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Every slave … who shall come or be brought, or be involuntarily in this state shall be free.

Item #24129, $2,200

Lincoln Rises to Top of “The Political Gymnasium” in Currier & Ives 1860 Presidential Election Print

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Print. The Political Gymnasium, lithograph cartoon. New York: Currier & Ives, 1860. Backed by linen. 1 p., 17½ x 12¾ in.

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Item #25454, $3,750

Patriotic Appeal for Artillery Recruits at Beginning of Civil War

[CIVIL WAR], Artillery Recruitment Broadside, Fifth Regiment, U.S. Army, ca. 1861. 1 p., 22½ x 31 in.

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Printed by Ringwalt & Brown in Philadelphia, this recruitment poster sought men between ages 18 and 35 to enlist in twelve mounted batteries of light artillery. Touted as the “only Regiment of its kind in the service, and the last chance for those who wish to join the flying artillery,” the field officers “are men of experience in the Regular Army,” so enlistees could be certain of “doing the duty of Soldiers, under the command of Soldiers.”

Item #24672, $7,500

“Copperheads Vigorously Prosecuting Peace: Is it the Peace YOU Want?”

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside, “Copperheads Vigorously Prosecuting Peace. Is it the Peace You Want?” c. March 1863. 1 p., 15½ x 23½ in.

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Read what they say…  Abraham Lincoln has usurped power, violated the Constitution, and put in peril the liberties of the people, but Jeff. Davis has not…. The South may make war on the North, but the North must not defend itself.... They have not a word to say in behalf of the Union, and our own imperiled liberties…

The Peace Democrats, or Copperheads, were a vocal minority of Northern Democrats who opposed the Civil War and the administration of President Abraham Lincoln, and were willing to recognize an independent Confederacy. This anti-Copperhead broadside, probably printed for the 1863 Connecticut gubernatorial, turns the resolutions of the February 1863 Hartford Convention against the Copperheads.

At top, a caricature shows Copperheads attacking Lady Liberty, who is holding a Union shield. First published in Harper’s Weekly on February 28, 1863, over the title, “The Copperhead Party.—In Favor of a Vigorous Prosecution of Peace!” this cartoon came to symbolize all those who opposed the Lincoln administration’s conduct of the war.

Item #23005, $2,750

Scarce “Third Day of the Battle of Gettysburg” Magnus Hand Colored View

[GETTYSBURG]. CHARLES MAGNUS, “Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 3rd 1863. The Third Day,” color print. New York: Charles Magnus, 1863. 23 x 17 ½ in.

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Item #24699, $2,500

Illustrator Frank Leslie Publishes Fanciful Grand Reception of Civil War Notables as a Subscription Premium

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Lithograph. “Grand Reception of the Notabilities of the Nation, at the White House 1865,” New York: Frank Leslie, [April] 1865. 1 p., 19 x 23¾ in.

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Frank Leslie published this print as a premium for his new family magazine, Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, and copyrighted it on April 8, 1865, just a week before Lincoln’s death. The image, created by engraver Henry B. Major and lithographer Joseph Knapp, portrays Lincoln, flanked by the First Lady and Vice President Andrew Johnson, greeting Julia Dent Grant, wife of Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant who stands nearby.

According to a notice printed at the bottom right corner, “Every Person who pays Ten Cents each for numbers 1 and 2 of Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, The New Family Paper, is entitled to a copy of this PLATE without extra charge,” or individuals could purchase the print for $3.

Item #25618, $2,750

National Thanksgiving by Thomas Nast

[HARPER’S WEEKLY], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, December 9, 1865.

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Item #H-12-9-1865, $275

Christmas Presents

[HARPER’S WEEKLY], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, December 30, 1865.

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Item #H-12-30-1865, $250

George Washington as a Mason

CURRIER & IVES. [GEORGE WASHINGTON], Print. Washington as a Mason. Small folio lithograph, 1868. Black & white.

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Item #23708, $850

New England Factory Life

[HARPER’S WEEKLY], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, July 25, 1868.

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Item #H-7-25-1868, $350

A Swamp Sparrow by Audubon

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON, Print. Swamp Sparrow, [1871]. 11½ x 15½ in. framed.

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Best known for his seminal Birds of America, Audubon’s prints are among the world’s most recognized images.

Item #22114.07, $300

A Song Finch by Audubon

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON, Print. Song Finch, [1871]. 11½ x 15½ in. framed.

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Best known for his seminal Birds of America, Audubon’s prints are among the world’s most recognized images.

Item #22114.04, $250

A Prairie Lark-Finch by Audubon

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON, Print. Prairie Lark-Finch, [1871]. 11½ x 15½ in. framed.

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Best known for his seminal Birds of America, Audubon’s prints are among the world’s most recognized images.

Item #22114.09, $250

A Common Crossbill by Audubon

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON, Print. Common Crossbill, [1871]. 11½ x 16 in. framed.

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Best known for his seminal Birds of America, Audubon’s prints are among the world’s most recognized images.

Item #22114.08, $275

A Great American White Egret by Audubon

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON, Print. Great American White Egret, [1871]. 14½ x 12 framed.

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Best known for his seminal Birds of America, Audubon’s prints are among the world’s most recognized images.

Item #22114.05, $550
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