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Women's History and First Ladies
Women's History and First Ladies

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Male Anti-Suffragist Ridicules “Taxation without Representation” Argument of Suffragists

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE]. FREDERICK DWIGHT, Pamphlet. “Taxation and Suffrage,” New York: New York State Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, ca. 1915-1917. 4 pp., 6 x 9 in.

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New York attorney Frederick Dwight insists in this brief pamphlet that women’s inability to vote bears no parallel to the American colonists’ protest of “taxation without representation.”

Item #24174.06, $75

English Sociologist and Novelist Martineau Signs a Note

HARRIET MARTINEAU, Autograph Note Signed. Address leaf, n.p. n.d.

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Item #21678.25, $100

World War I Fight for Woman Suffrage in New York Discussed in Global Context

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE], Printed Document. “Suffrage as a War Measure,” New York: National Woman Suffrage Publishing Co., October 1917. 4 pp.

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Men of New York State don’t wait until the war is over to admit the justice and necessity of woman suffrage here. For the sake of the strength it will add to the nation, vote for woman Suffrage November 6.

The New York State Woman Suffrage Party draws on international examples and women’s contributions to the war effort to urge New York men to vote for woman suffrage.

Item #24174.03, $200

Woman Suffrage Party Urges Male New Yorkers to Pledge in Favor of Women’s Suffrage

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE], Printed Document. Ticket of Support for Women’s Suffrage. New York: New York State Woman Suffrage Party, ca. 1915-1917. 1 p., 4¾ x 3 in.

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This “ticket” allowed male voters to express their belief that “the vote should be granted to the Women of New York.

Item #22444.25, $250

Twenty Facts - Woman Suffrage Talking Points in 1913

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE], Broadsheet. “Twenty Facts about Woman Suffrage,” New York: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1913. 2 pp., 6⅛ x 8 in.

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In all the equal suffrage states women teachers and women in public service get equal pay for equal work.

Small broadsheet issued by the National American Woman Suffrage Association highlighting positive experience of states and countries that had given women full or partial franchise.

Item #24174.01, $350

Pamphlet Quotes President Wilson to Support Woman Suffrage in New York State

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE], Pamphlet. “What President Wilson Says,” New York: National Woman Suffrage Publishing Co., ca. June-October 1917. 4 pp., 5 x 7 in.

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This pamphlet, issued by the New York State Woman Suffrage Party, quoted speeches and letters by President Woodrow Wilson to urge New York men to vote for woman suffrage on November 6, 1917.

Item #22444.26, $350

Carrie Chapman Catt Signed 1899 Receipt to Fellow Suffragette Harriet Taylor Upton

CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT, Autograph Document Signed. Check. New York, N.Y., December 31, 1899. 1 p.

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Item #21678.22, $375

Author, Educator, and Lecturer Kate Sanborn Gathers Ladies for Lunch

KATE SANBORN, Autograph Letter Signed. [New York, N.Y.?] 4 pp., 4 ½ x 7 in.

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Item #21678.27, $450

Feminist Anna Dickinson Refuses to Apologize

ANNA ELIZABETH DICKINSON, Autograph Letter Signed, to A. Boyd. August 1, 1866. 2 pp.

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Item #21678.19, $500

Extremely Unwoke Women’s Suffrage Views by a Chicago Italian-American Attorney

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE]. CAIROLI GIGLIOTTI, Book. Woman Suffrage: Its Causes and Possible Consequences. Chicago: Press of Barnard & Miller, 1914. 92 pp.

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it is clear that woman suffrage should be discarded for the following reasons: First. It disrupts the home.... Second. The woman is physically unfit for certain offices.... Third. Politics is the most corrupt game of the age.... Fourth. The right to vote does imply the right to become eligible to nomination or election to public offices.... Fifth. The influence of the woman should be of a persuasive nature, and should be exercised at home.... Sixth. Jealousy would destroy domestic happiness.... Seventh. Women voters are unnecessary.... Eighth. Women could never control men, on account of weaker physical conditions.... Ninth. The needs of the family would be increased while incomes would decrease.... Tenth. When the woman is with child, she is liable to suffer as a result of any emotion or abuse....” (p74-76)

Gigliotti, a naturalized Italian-American attorney in Chicago, declares limited women’s suffrage as a failure in reforming politics and even opposes separate ownership of property by women, because husbands use their wives to hide their assets.

Item #25602, $600

Susan B. Anthony Sends Letter to Kansas Suffragist Leader

SUSAN B. ANTHONY, National Woman Suffrage Association Centennial Headquarters envelope, to “Mrs Judge Gray / Leavenworth / Kan,” with “Centennial Questions,” 1876. Philadelphia: National Woman Suffrage Association. 1 p., 5⅞ x 3⅜ in.

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Susan B. Anthony addresses an envelope from the National Woman Suffrage Association headquarters in Philadelphia to prominent Kansas suffragist Mary Tenney Gray. The pointed questions on this envelope urged women’s claims to suffrage as an essential part of their being citizens of the Republic. On July 4, 1876, Susan B. Anthony read The Declaration for the Rights of Women from a podium in front of the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia to a cheering crowd.

Item #22444.22, $650

Carrie Chapman Catt’s Book, with editor’s letter promoting the “Co-Workers Edition” – to a noted Chicago Suffrage leader, millionaire and vice chair of Republican Party

CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT & NETTIE ROGERS SHULER, Book. Woman Suffrage and Politics: The Inner Story of the Suffrage Movement. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1923. No. 122 of 1,000 “Co-workers edition,” copy belonging to Chicago suffragist, millionaire and vice chairman of the Republican Party, Bertha Baur. 504 pp., 5¾ x 8¼ in.

With: ROSE YOUNG. Typed Letter Signed, March 15, 1923, to Bertha Baur, New York, NY. On colorful illustrated “The Woman Citizen” letterhead. 1 p., 8⅜ x 10¾ in. #25601.01

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The gates to political enfranchisement have swung open. The women are inside.

Item #25601, $950

Alice Stone Blackwell Signed
Suffragette Periodical Stock Certificate

ALICE STONE BLACKWELL, Partially Printed Document Signed. Five shares of the Woman’s Journal, Certificate #117, November 18, 1910.

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Item #23076, $1,400

“Votes for Women”

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE], Votes for Women Flag. 8 x 5½ in., attached to the original 18 in. stick. Ca. 1910. Framed.

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Item #21421, ON HOLD

Mocking First National Women’s Rights Convention

[WOMEN’S RIGHTS], Newspaper. The Caledonian, November 16, 1850. St. Johnsbury, Vermont: Albert G. Chadwick. 4 pp.

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From their own talk it is easy to see that it was mainly a gathering of uncomfortable females—some of whom by their own avowal are infidels—consisting of disappointed spinsters (who never spin)—disaffected wives (who want to be husbands) and widows of ‘uneasy virtue’ and more uneasy ambition, whose wants are not exactly understood by themselves.

This issue includes a front-page reprint of a Burlington Sentinel (Vermont) article scoffing at the first national “Woman’s Rights Convention” held in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Item #24971, $1,600

New York Court of Appeals Considers Married Women’s Property Rights

[WOMEN’S RIGHTS], Manuscript Document. Summary of Points in Executors of Maitland v. Amelia M. Whitlock, June 1872, Court of Appeals of the State of New York. 8 pp., 6.25 x 8.75 in.

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Item #26037, $1,650

Eleanor Roosevelt Defends Universal Military Training – and 18 year-old Voting Rights

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to Flora E. Shirah, February 27, 1951. 2 pp., 7¼ x 10¼ in.

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I suppose you can say that anything which is obligatory is in some degree similar to communism or fascism. The only difference here is that we the people, are consulted and it is our representatives through whom we speak… I think you are a trifle emotional when you call 18 year old men, children. I think they should be allowed to vote…. Of course there are inequalities and injustices in any big undertaking.

I am sorry if you feel that you can not trust your government…. You can not expect always to have one man who will carry the burdens of the whole democracy and express their thinking for them. Now we have to do it for ourselves.

We are not alone in Korea, many nations are represented … but we have to bear the brunt … because we were spared during the last war from war in our own country and therefore today we are the strongest nation in the world.

A mothers’ rebellion would certainly be a novel and interesting undertaking because there would be a division even among the mothers. I do not know, nor could I tell you exactly how you could find out how many men in Congress have eighteen year old sons but I am sure there are a great many who have.

A rich and fascinating letter by one of the twentieth century’s most powerful first ladies.

Item #24793, $2,500

“perhaps the best place to begin is with the Jews and colored people”: Eleanor Roosevelt responds to an idea for promoting better relations between Jews and Gentiles

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to Prudence B. Anderson, February 15, 1941. On White House stationery, with original envelope, and 3 page retained carbon copy of Anderson’s letter to which this responds. 1 p.

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“There is no doubt that there is a need for improving the understanding and co-operation between the various races which make up the U.S.A., and perhaps the best place to begin is with the Jews and colored people”

Item #25077, $4,800

Mary Lincoln’s Signed Copy of The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France

MARY LINCOLN, Signed Book. “Mary Lincoln. / 1878,” in her copy of Charles Duke Yonge, The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France, 2d rev. ed. (London: Hurst and Blackett, 1877), xvi, 432 pp., 8vo. bound in tooled purple cloth boards with titled spine. A carte-de-visite portrait of Mary Lincoln has been affixed to the front free endpaper.

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she bore her accumulated miseries with a serene resignation, an intrepid fortitude, a true heroism of soul, of which the history of the world does not afford a brighter example.

Item #24759, $5,000

Eleanor Roosevelt on the Meaning of Civil Rights

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to “Harry,” Washington, D.C., February 19, 1944. 2 pp., 6¼ x 9¼ in. On White House stationery.

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“Something has to happen to people’s souls before they are going to give the rights of citizenship to all the people of our country, regardless of color or creed. That does not mean you have to ask them to dinner. It only means giving them the rights that go with citizenship.”

Item #23592, $15,000
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