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World War I and II
World War I and II

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Eisenhower Signed D-Day Message

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, Signed Book in dark blue ink. Statement to the soldiers, sailors and airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force on June 6, 1944. Document is approx. 5 ¾ x 9 ½ in.

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From a limited edition of Eisenhower’s Crusade in Europe, (New York: Doubleday & Co., 1948), limited to 1,426 copies. The war had ended only three years earlier, and Eisenhower must have been looking towards politics - he was elected to the Presidency in 1952.

Item #24208.03, $6,500

Sterling Silver Sinseollo Dish,
Presented to General Matthew Ridgway
by the Korean Minister of Defense

[MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY], Traditional Korean dish, engraved around the base with four stars, and the inscription, “General & Mrs. M. B. Ridgway / From Defense Minister & Mrs. Ki Poong Lee / Republic of Korea,” ca. 1952.

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Item #22366, $4,250

Harding’s Return to Normalcy – and Isolationism – after World War I

WARREN G. HARDING, Typed Letter Signed as President, to Senator Joseph Medill McCormick, Washington, D. C., August 29, 1921. With autograph emendations in two different secretarial hands. 8 pp.

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Key political circular from the first-year Republican President written to influence off-year elections in New Mexico and other places. Harding justifies, and praises, the rapid postwar dismantling of America’s military by Congress, while backhandedly criticizing the inattention of his predecessor – Woodrow Wilson – to the peacetime transition. “Vast expenditure without proper consideration for results, is the inevitable fruit of war.”

Item #21124, $2,600

Teddy Roosevelt Criticizes British and American Preparedness for World War I

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to R. M. Johnston, Oyster Bay, November 24, 1915. 1 p., 6½ x 7¾ in.

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the English are most sensitive about my having stated that they had failed to do what they ought to have done, thanks to their lack of preparedness in advance; and this although I stated at the same time that we would have done infinitely worse.

Item #24493.01, $1,900

FBI Director Warns Polaroid to Guard against Espionage and Sabotage before American Entry into World War II

J. EDGAR HOOVER, Typed Letter Signed, to Officers of Polaroid Company, on FBI letterhead, marked “Personal and Confidential,” Washington, October 22, 1940. 1 p., 7¼ x 9¼ in. #23917.01

Typed Letter Signed, to Edwin H. Land, on FBI letterhead, Washington, January 10, 1941. 8 pp., 7¼ x 9¼ in. #23917.02

Book. “Secret” booklet published by the FBI Suggestions for Protection of Industrial Facilities, April, 1941. 50 pp. #23917.03

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In these two letters, J. Edgar Hoover offers general and specific advice to the Polaroid Company of Massachusetts to protect it against “foreign espionage and sabotage” as America tries to stay out of the world war ravaging Europe and Asia.

Item #23917, $1,500

William K. And Harold Vanderbilt Signed
World War I Veterans Bonus New York State Bond

[WILLIAM K. VANDERBILT], Partially Printed Document Signed. $50,000 World War Bonus Bond, issued to William K. Vanderbilt, Harold S. Vanderbilt, and Frederick W. Vanderbilt as trustees for Anna H. Vanderbilt, signed by first two. Certificate #64, with engraved vignette of the state seal. October 16, 1944.

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Item #23087, $750

Chicagoans Confront World War II Racism and the American Red Cross

COMMITTEE OF RACIAL EQUALITY, Typed Document, The American Red Cross and Negro Blood, Background for Action Pamphlet No. 1, ca. 1943, Chicago. 12 p., 5⅝ x 8½ in. Includes inserted printed flyer, “The Red Cross and Its Jim Crow Policy,” distributed by CORE in Chicago in 1943.

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the blood will be processed separately so that those receiving transfusions may be given plasma from the blood of their own race.

The Chicago-based biracial Committee of Racial Equality (CORE) combated segregation in all forms, including the racial segregation of donated blood during World War II. After initially refusing to accept blood donations from African Americans, the American Red Cross reversed its position but bowed to racial prejudices by keeping donated blood segregated by race. This pamphlet by CORE includes a chronology of the controversy over blood donations, documents from the Red Cross, scientific organizations, and the press, a summary of CORE’s actions in Chicago, and suggestions for group and individual action.

Item #23678, $650

Striking World War II Poster:
UNITED we are strong / UNITED we will win

[WORLD WAR II]. HENRY KOERNER, Poster. “UNITED we are strong / UNITED we will win.” No. 64. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office for Office of War Information, 1943. 1 p., 20 x 28 in.

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This bold and colorful poster pictures Allied unity through more than a dozen cannon exploding skyward, each wrapped with the flag of an allied nation: Brazil, Belgium, Norway, the United Kingdom, Mexico, the United States, China, the Soviet Union, Australia, and Czechoslovakia.

Item #24015, $550

Haim Laskov Writes to His Future Wife during WWII

HAIM LASKOV, Autograph Letter Signed, to Shulamith Chen. Italy, Nov. 19, 1943. 2 pp. Heading in English, body in Hebrew.

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“Night after night I watch (the stars) and read your regards.”

Item #20756, $400