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The Alexander Hamilton Collection:
A Show-Stopping Gathering of Highly Important
Original Letters, Documents and Imprints

[ALEXANDER HAMILTON], The Alexander Hamilton Collection contains hundreds of documents from leaders, soldiers, citizens and the press, written when the Revolutionary War and Founding were current events. The Collection includes powerful letters and documents of Hamilton, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Aaron Burr, among many others.

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We are pleased to offer a unique collection of original documents that made American history. These documents tell the story of the orphan immigrant founding father who fought for independence, founded our financial system, and fostered a government capable of surviving internal factions and foreign foes.

Item #24685, $3,800,000

Masonic Apron, Neck Sash & Medal of U.S. Mint - California Gold Refiner James Booth, with a Lithograph of Him

[JAMES CURTIS BOOTH], Collection.

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Item #23610, $3,000

1607 Cornelis van Wytfliet’s Norvmbega et Virginia

CORNELIS VAN WYTFLIET, Norvmbega et Virginia. 1607, Second state. 9 x 11 ½”.

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Taken from the first atlas devoted entirely to America, this is only the second map to use ‘Virginia’ in its title, after the White-De Bry of 1590 [AL 09], on which this is partly derived.  Despite major inaccuracies – such as the labeling of the Chesapeake’s latitude near present-day Maine, and the depiction of the mythical city of Norumbega – this map was the most accurate map of the east coast until de Laet (1630).

Item #21001.99, $4,800

With His Colony Just Over a Year Old, William Penn Sells 500 Acres for Pennies an Acre

WILLIAM PENN, Manuscript Document Signed, to William Clark. [London], April 24, 1682. 1 p., 19 x 14 in. On vellum, with red wax signet seal attached to a vellum tab at bottom Countersigned by three witnesses on verso.

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Just 13 months after Pennsylvania was created, this indenture records a land transaction, where William Penn sold 500 acres in Pennsylvania to fellow Quaker William Clark(e) for 5 shillings. Clark became Provincial Councilor and Justice of the Peace in Sussex County (now Delaware). He lived in the area disputed by Lord Baltimore and Penn, and attempted to mediate the dispute between the two proprietors, to no avail.

Item #23407, $7,500

The Acting Governor of New York
Thanks William Penn for a Gift

ANTHONY BROCKHOLLS, Autograph Letter Signed to Governor William Penn. New York, May 1, 1683

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“As the loadstone attracts Iron, so ought acknowledgemts to pursue faviours … [I] dare not presume any further having soe lately recd soe great a marke of your bounty….”

Deputy Governor Anthony Brockholls of New York extends a cordial note to Governor William Penn in the midst of continuing deliberations between Penn and Lord Baltimore over the southern boundary of Pennsylvania and possession of Delaware.

Item #21618, $40,000

1686 Huguenot Protestant religious prisoner’s pin prick note, with notes of wife and child, and 1842 letter of Dr. Johnson Eliot, a founder of Georgetown Medical College

[FRENCH HUGUENOT], Pin-pricked Manuscript Note, with his wife’s Autograph Note, in French, ca. 1686. 1 p. Also with his son or daughter’s additional note in English. JOHNSON ELIOT, Autograph Letter Signed, June 19, 1842, gifting the above letter. 1 p. In all 3 pp.

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Item #24146.01, $5,000

“THE GREATEST OF EARLY AMERICAN MAPS”

THOMAS HOLME, [Across the Top]: A Map of the Improved Part of the Province of Pennsilvania in America. Begun by Wil: Penn Proprietary and Governour thereof Anno 1681. [Decorative cartouche to right]: A Map of the Province of Pennsilvania. Containing the three Countyes of Chester, Philadelphia, & Bucks, as far as yet Surveyed and Laid out….

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The “greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece” (Corcoran).

“This monumental work is without question the finest printed cartographic document relating to North America to be published to date.” (Burden). No other English American colony was mapped in the seventeenth century on such a large scale, and in such amazing detail.

Item #22133, PRICE ON REQUEST

William Penn Wanted For Treason

[WILLIAM PENN], Newspaper. The London Gazette, February 9, 1690, 2 pp., 6¼ x 11¼ in.

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Pennsylvania founder William Penn supported James II during the Glorious Revolution, James’s attempt to regain the English throne. When William and Mary ascended the throne, Penn was suspected of treason.

Item #30000.54, $900

William Penn Appoints Customs Officer for Kent County to Enforce Navigation Acts

WILLIAM PENN, Manuscript Document Signed, Appointment for customs agent (with name left blank) for “the County of Kent, annexed to the Province of Pennsylvania” [now Delaware], Philadelphia, March 10, 1701. On vellum. 1 p., 16¾ x 9¼ in.

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As proprietor of Pennsylvania, including the later state of Delaware, Penn authorizes the appointment of a yet-unnamed customs agent for Kent county. Customs agents were an essential part of funding the British mercantile system. Due to the belief that there was a finite amount of money in the world, Britain sought to keep the benefits of trade within the Empire and minimize the export of gold and silver.

Item #23989.01, $9,000

“Oaths & Declarations”: William Penn, Jr. and Quakers
Sign Separate Declaration to Sit on Pennsylvania Council with Non-Quakers

WILLIAM PENN, JR, Manuscript Document Signed. N.p. [likely Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], n.d. [ca. February-September 1704]. 2 pp., on bifolium sheet. 320 x 198 mm. One page docketed on verso, “Oaths & Declarations / of Members of Council / Stenton.”

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Document signed by Pennsylvania’s political leaders during a stormy period in the province’s history, which saw chronic tensions between Quakers and non-Quakers, between the “lower counties” of Delaware and the rest of the province, and between the proprietor (William Penn) and the Assembly. All the same, the separate signatures on two sheets of paper attests to the landmark commitment of Penn to religious tolerance.

Item #21923, $18,000

William Penn’s Copy of Privy Council Decision:
Delaware Belongs to Him, not to Lord Baltimore

WILLIAM PENN, Autograph Docket on Manuscript Document. [London, England], January 27, 1709 (document reads “1708,” but is actually 1709, because, before 1752, Britain and its colonies held to the old Julian calendar with March 25 as the first day of the calendar year). 2 pp., 7⅝ x 12 in.

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“Upon reading this day at the Board the Humble petition of Wm. Penn Esqr … Her Maty. in Councill taking the same into her consideration is Graciously pleased, to ordr accordingly, that the sd petition of the Lord Baltimore, Be, and it is hereby Dismissed”

Item #21622, $50,000

Earliest Known Letter from John to Thomas Penn
Also Signed Many Times by Thomas Penn

JOHN PENN, Autograph Letter Signed. Bristoll, 4 Decem: 1715. 1 page, with autograph address and six examples of Thomas Penn’s signature on verso.

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all Relations have much as they ware & give their Dear Love to Father & Mother…”

15-year old John, having just left the Penn household in Ruscombe, England, writes home. He mentions his mother’s cooking and the well-documented family love of chocolate. The recipient, John’s younger brother, Thomas Penn, who later owned ¾ of William Penn’s proprietary interest in Pennsylvania, practices signing his name on the address leaf. The “Black Cap” referred to in John’s postscript is a reference to the famous Quaker hat. Quakers, as a sign of their egalitarianism, refused to take their hat off for anyone, regardless of societal rank. “Addam” was William Penn’s nickname, a reference to the biblical first man.

Item #21619.99, $25,000

Rare Issue of John Peter Zenger’s
New-York Weekly Journal, 1734

[JOHN PETER ZENGER], Newspaper, The New-York Weekly Journal, Containing the freshest advices, Foreign and Domestick, Numb. XXXIV. New York: John Peter Zenger, June 24, 1734 4 pp. 11 x 6⅞ in.

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John Peter Zenger’s iconic newspaper, The New-York Weekly Journal, was created to spark popular opposition to William Cosby, the new royal governor of New York. He was the last colonist to be prosecuted for seditious libel, and to have his case go to trial, before the American Revolution. Zenger’s case, ending in his acquittal, stands as a landmark in the history of one of our most basic rights – freedom of the press. Historian Leonard Levy concludes that “the Zenger verdict made people exult in liberty and the relationship of liberty of the press to liberty itself.”

Pre-1768 newspapers are exceedingly rare, and this newspaper is central to the debate over freedom of the press in America.

Item #30026.01, $4,800

Rare Colonial Newspaper: A 1737 Issue of The Boston Weekly News-Letter, the Oldest Regularly Published Paper in America

[COLONIAL PRINTING], Newspaper. New=England, The Boston Weekly News-letter, October 13, 1737. Boston, John Draper. Complete in 2 pp., 9 ¼ x 14 ⅛ in. Subscriber’s name “Mr. Samll Cooke” penned in the margin.

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A fresh example of this colonial paper in fine condition with untrimmed (deckled) edges, and a noteworthy provenance. A rare opportunity to own a very early issue of America’s first successful newspaper.

Item #24835, $4,000

Broadside Declaring War on Spain

[GEORGE II], Broadside, “His Majesty’s Declaration of War Against the King of Spain,” John Bassett, printer, London, October 19, 1739, 16 x 21 in., with contemporary manuscript notes and docketing, October 23, 1739.

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Parliament goes to war after Robert Jenkins displays his detached ear.

Item #22456, $4,500

1747 Emanuel Bowen Map of North American Harbors

EMANUEL BOWEN, Map. “Particular Draughts and Plans of Some of the Principal Towns and Harbours belonging to the English, French, and Spaniards; in America and West Indies. Collected from the best Authorities. By Eman. Bowen.” London, 1747. 17 x 14 in.

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Item #20873, $1,400

A French Wall Map of the Western Hemisphere

GASPARD BAILLEUL, Map. L’Amerique Divisee en ses Pricipales Parties ou sont distingues les ud de autres les Estats, selon quils appartiennents presentement aux Differents Souverains De L’Europe . . . Par le Sr. Bailleul le jeune Geographe. Jean Louis Daudet, Lyon, France, 1752. Approximately 31 x 40 in., on original wooden rollers.

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Item #22142, $25,000

Benjamin Franklin’s Newspaper Reports on the Proposed Union of the Colonies

[BENJAMIN FRANKLIN], Newspaper. Pennsylvania Gazette, Philadelphia, Pa., September 12, 1754. 4 pp., 9¼ x 14½ in.

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New York’s legislative bodies and governor volley for position on a defensive pact that suggested that the colonies join together for the first time. With the usual shipping news, advertisements, and news from other colonial cities, including New York and Williamsburg.

Item #22426.06, $3,800

Benjamin Franklin’s Newspaper Reports Virginia’s Call to Arms at the Outset of the French and Indian War

[BENJAMIN FRANKLIN], Newspaper. Pennsylvania Gazette, Philadelphia, Pa., November 7, 1754. 4 pp., 9¼ x 14½ in.

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From Williamsburg, Virginia, Governor Robert Dinwiddie addresses the House of Burgesses to address the continuing problem of French and Indian incursions into Virginia’s western territories and calling them to action.

Item #22426.08, $3,800

John Hancock Writes His Brother with Seasons Greetings, Inquiring of Family News, and Asking About the Family Slaves

JOHN HANCOCK, Autograph Letter Signed, to Ebenezer Hancock. London, England December 27, 1760. 8½ x 7 in., with remnants of a black wax seal.

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Writing from London while attending his uncle’s business, a young John Hancock asks about his uncle and aunts, congratulates his sister’s marriage, talks about his own ill health and recovery, and inquires about the house slaves at the Hancock Mansion.

Item #23234, $29,000
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