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To Avoid Abuse from “bigots in religion...politics, or...medicine,” Thomas Jefferson Declines to Publish Benjamin Rush’s Private Correspondence

THOMAS JEFFERSON, Autograph Letter Signed, to James Mease. With conjoined franked address leaf in Jefferson’s hand. August 17, 1816. Monticello, [Charlottesville, Va.]. 1 p., 9¾ x 8 in.

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

Thomas Jefferson, long since retired to private life, declines the request of Dr. James Mease for copies of Dr. Benjamin Rush’s correspondence with Jefferson. Mease had hoped to include them in a volume of Rush’s letters to be published and specifically requested letters pertaining to Rush’s personal views on religion and politics. After demurring, Jefferson discusses at length the differences between personal and official correspondence, with philosophical thoughts on public versus private expression. He closes with assurances that his decision is nothing personal, and of his great respect for Mease: “I hope, my dear Sir, you will see in my scruples only a sentiment of fidelity to a deceased friend.”

Item #23233

Hamilton’s Back-Door Implementation of His Report on Manufactures Tariff Proposals, in Jefferson-Signed Act of Congress Raising Funds to Protect the Nation’s Frontier

THOMAS JEFFERSON, Document Signed as Secretary of State. An Act for raising a farther sum of Money for the Protection of the Frontiers, and for other Purposes therein mentioned. May 2, 1792, [Philadelphia]. Signed in type by George Washington as President, Jonathan Trumbull as Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Richard Henry Lee as President pro tempore of the Senate. 4 pp., 9½ x 15 in.

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

While Hamilton’s Report on Manufactures is now acknowledged as one of the greatest of American economic papers, Congress promptly tabled it upon delivery in December 1791. Having won the hard-fought battle for his Assumption Plan, he did not push for its adoption. But in March 1792, Congress requested ideas to raise additional revenues needed to defend the nation’s Western frontiers from British Forces and their Indian allies. Hamilton was able to answer the call for funding with the present act’s import tariffs, which boosted American manufactures.

Item #24196

Mozart’s “La Bataille” Rare Autograph Musical Manuscript

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART, Autograph Musical Manuscript, “La Bataille” K.535, a contredanse for orchestra. No place or date, but Vienna, by January 23, 1788. The complete work.

Six pages, consisting of an oblong quarto (ca. 23.3 x 31.8 cm) unbound bifolium plus a single leaf of 12-stave musical manuscript paper, with watermark of three moons and the initials “VA” (“AV”) beneath a crown (Tyson watermark 95). With autograph title “La Bataille” boldly written at head.

Notated in brown ink on one 8-stave system per page. Foliated in ink “1” – “3.” Uncut and with original deckled edges. Scored for two violins, flageolet (“flauto piccolo”), two clarinets, bassoon, trumpet, tenor drum (“trammel”), violoncello and double bass (“bassi”).

With occasional autograph corrections, deletions and revisions including an 8-bar addition to the “Marcia turca” and autograph superscripts marking the different sections of the work: “[Parte] 1ma [bb.1-16]... [Parte] 2da [bb. 17-32]... [Parte] 3za [bb. 33-48]... [Parte] 4ta [bb. 49-63]... Marcia turca [bb. 64-86].”

With additional modern foliation in pencil and several manuscript annotations in both ink and pencil including an attestation of authenticity to upper right-hand corner by George Nikolaus von Nissen (“Von Mozart und seiner Handschrift”), incorrectly dated “1791” in the hand of Johann Anton André; “No 8” to upper left-hand corner in the hand of the so-called “Grauer Schreiber,” who participated in the ordering of Mozart’s estate; “gestochen” (printed) in another hand; and the pencilled number “74” to right-hand margin (corresponding to the position of the work in Mozart’s own thematic catalogue).

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Item #24884, PRICE ON REQUEST

The Assumption Plan, Passed as Four Acts of Congress

[ALEXANDER HAMILTON], Newspaper. Gazette of the United States, New York: John Fenno. 16 pp. Included in full, all four parts of Hamilton’s Assumption Plan, as passed by Congress, in the issues of August 7, 14, 21, and 28, 1790. (4 pp. each)

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

“Justice and the support of the public credit require, that provision should be made for fulfilling the engagements of the United States, in respect to their foreign debt, and for funding their domestic debt upon equitable and satisfactory terms.”

Item #30022.27-.30

The Charter for Hamilton’s “Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures”

[ALEXANDER HAMILTON], Newspaper. Gazette of the United States, September 10, 1791. Philadelphia: John Fenno. 4 pp. 10 x 16 in. Including the Charter for the Society of Useful Manufactures in full, and a report on Joseph Brant, the famous Mohawk Indian Chief.

Item #30019

Benjamin Franklin Calls For Abolition of Slavery, Washington Addresses the Dutch Reformed Church on Religious Freedom, Thanksgiving Thoughts, Hamilton’s Plans, and More

[BENJAMIN FRANKLIN], Newspaper. Gazette of the United States. November 25, 1789, New York, N.Y., 4 pp., (pp. 257-60), 10 x 16 in.

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

This important newspaper includes an October 9, 1789 letter to George Washington, with his Address responding To the Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church in North America discussing his gratitude for their support, thanks for the nation weathering the revolution and peacefully establishing constitutional government, and ensuring religious freedom. (p. 1, col. 3).

As well as a printing of Benjamin Franklin’s “Address to the Public from the Pennsylvania Society for promoting the Abolition of Slavery and the Relief of free Negroes unlawfully held in bondage.”

Item #23116

The Declaration of Independence
Rare Broadside Printed and Posted in July, 1776

[DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE], Broadside. [Exeter, New Hampshire: attributed Robert Luist Fowle], [ca. July 16-19, 1776], two-column format, sheet size approx. 15⅛ x 19⅝ in. Pin holes in three corners, with the upper-left corner torn in approx the same position, indicates that this was posted publicly to spread the momentous news.

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Broadsides such as this fanned the flames of independence. Passed from hand to hand, read aloud at town gatherings, or posted in public places, broadsides (single pages with print only one side) were meant to quickly convey news. Including the present copy, there are fewer than a dozen examples of this Exeter, N.H. printing known. Pin holes in three corners and the torn upper-left corner suggest this example was posted publicly.

In a way, this Declaration broadside is even more “original” than the signed manuscript pictured by most Americans. This is not yet “The Unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States,” but rather “A Declaration, by the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress assembled.” On July 4,  New York’s delegation abstained from voting for  independence. After replacing their delegates, New York joined the other 12 colonies.

Moreover, as here on the broadside, the July 4 Declaration was signed by only two men: Continental Congress President John Hancock and Secretary Charles Thomson (here with the common variant “Thompson”). After New York on board, Congress resolved on July 19 to have the Declaration engrossed with a new title: “The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America.” Most of the 56 signers affixed their names on the engrossed document on August 2, 1776, with some added even later.

Thus, broadsides such as this one preserve the text of the Declaration of Independence as it actually was issued in July of 1776.

Item #21991.99, PRICE ON REQUEST

An Act to Incorporate the Subscribers to the Bank of the United States

[GEORGE WASHINGTON], Newspaper. Gazette of the United States, March 2, 1791. Philadelphia: John Fenno. 4 pp. (765-768), 10½ x 17 in. Includes full text of February 25 Act to Incorporate the Subscribers to the Bank of the United States.

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

“The establishment of a bank for the United States … upon the principles which afford adequate security for an upright and prudent administration.”

Item #23392

One of the Earliest Printings of the Declaration of Independence - July 8, 1776, Bound with a Very Rare Copy of the Most Complete Printing of Common Sense

[THOMAS PAINE], Robert Bell’s “complete” edition of Common Sense, made up from pamphlets first sold independently. Common Sense; with the Whole Appendix: The Address to the Quakers: Also, the Large Additions, and a Dialogue between the Ghost of General Montgomery, just arrived from the Elysian fields; and an American Delegate in a Wood, near Philadelphia: On the Grand Subject of American Independancy. [Second title:] Common Sense; Addressed to the Inhabitants of America … Third edition. [Third title:] Large Additions to Common Sense. … II. The Propriety of Independancy, by Demophilus. … An Appendix to Common Sense. [Fourth title:] A Dialogue between the Ghost of General Montgomery, Just arrived from the Elysian Fields; and an American Delegate in a Wood near Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Printed, and Sold, by R. Bell, 1776. 8vo in half-sheets, general half-title, U3 with ads and Bell’s statement “Self-defence against unjust attacks”; natural paper flaw in lower blank margin of final leaf. (Gimbel CS-9; Evans 14966; Adams, American Independence 222e).

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

This is likely the finest copy extant of the first book printing of the Declaration of Independence, preserved with other significant pamphlets of the American Revolution, including the best early edition of Common Sense. The Declaration was printed immediately following The Genuine Principles of the Ancient Saxon, or English Constitution… By Demophilus, which was already in the press. The terminal ad leaf dates it to July 8, 1776. Bound together with five separately issued pamphlets, possibly compiled by Thomas Paine.

From the library of Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu (1755–1824), with press-mark of his library at the château de La Brède. He was a grandson of the famous enlightenment philosopher, and son of a founder of Freemasonry in France (along with Thomas Paine and Benjamin Franklin). Charles-Louis corresponded with Franklin and served as aide-de-camp to the Comte de Rochambeau and the Marquis de Chastellux. After fighting at Yorktown, he was among the delegation sent to inform the King of France of the victory. Accompanied by the statement on the provenance of the book by Charles-Henry de Montesquieu, a descendant). Sold at Sotheby’s June 19, 2015.

The Declaration was first printed by John Dunlap, the official printer to the Continental Congress, as a broadside on the evening of July 4 into the morning of July 5, 1776. The text next appeared in the July 6 issue of The Pennsylvania Evening Post, and on July 8th in Dunlap’s own newspaper, The Pennsylvania Packet, or General Advertiser.

Genuine Principles was already on the press when Dunlap’s broadside appeared. Bell quickly added a new gathering to accommodate the Declaration, and a stirring introduction: “The events which have given birth to this mighty revolution; and will vindicate the provisions that shall be wisely made against our ever again relapsing into a state of bondage and misery, cannot be better set forth than in the following Declaration of American Independence.

On the final leaf, the advertisement dated July 8th announces Bell’s next publication, “In a few days,” of American Independence the Interest and Glory of Great Britain. (A copy of John Cartwright’s anonymous pamphlet is bound in the present volume).

Advertisements in the July 9th issue of the Pennsylvania Evening Post and the July 10th issue of the Pennsylvania Gazette for Genuine Principles say that it was “just printed, published and now selling by Robert Bell.” Bell’s printing is not simply the first book printing of the Declaration; it is one of the earliest printings overall—and one of the rarest.

In a way, this Declaration imprint is even more “original” than the signed Declaration manuscript. This is the July 4th Declaration, not yet Unanimous. The engrossed manuscript was prepared only after New York’s legislature heard the news, and then voted to join the other 12 colonies. The “National Treasure” document was prepared, and the signers added their “John Hancocks” in August.

The first pamphlet in this sammelband is Robert Bell’s “complete” edition of Common Sense, made up from very rare pamphlets sold independently, with the text that Paine gave first to another printer after Bell claimed he was losing money selling a pamphlet that was as hot a ticket as HAMILTON.

Item #24865
Image
Not
Available

The News in 1815: 104 Issues of the Boston Patriot

[WAR OF 1812], Newspapers. January 1815 to December 30, 1815 (Vol. XII, no. 34 - vol. XIV, no. 33). Boston, Mass., Davis C. Ballard. 104 issues, each 4 pp., 14 x 20 1/8 in. Bound in 19th-century quarter calf and marbled boards. With some column-width engraved illustrations.

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Item #20655,

“The body of your son cannot be moved until cold weather sets in…”

EDWARD SCHWARTZ, Autograph Letter Signed, to “Mr. Tilty.” September 10, 1863, 8 x 10 in. rag paper, 1 p.

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Item #21265.04, $75

Five Days of Forage for Artillery Horses at Harpers Ferry

[1st OHIO LIGHT ARTILLERY], Partially Printed Document Signed by Frederick Dorries and Franklin C. Gibbs; approved and signed by Col. Edgar M. Gregory. Requisition for Forage. Harpers Ferry, Virginia, October 15, 1862. 1 p., 10 x 8 in.

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Item #21264.09, $75

Keeping Track of Oats, Pencils, and Hammers in the Union Army

[22nd MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY], Partially Printed Document Signed by William H. Steele as acting regimental quartermaster. Monthly Return of Quartermaster’s Stores. City Point, Virginia, September 30, 1864. 8 pp.

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Item #21264.10, $75

Blanche Bruce, The First Full-term African American U.S. Senator Signs a Deed

BLANCHE BRUCE, Document Signed. Land deed. Washington, D.C. September 30, 1890. Signature panel 8¼ x 3½ in., overall dimensions 8¼ x 14 in.

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Blanche Bruce was the first full-term African American to serve in the U.S. Senate, 1875-1881. He was then appointed by President James Garfield as Register of the U.S. Treasury in 1881. He later served as the Washington, D.C. Recorder of Deeds (a position earlier held by Frederick Douglass), 1890-1893 and again as Register of the Treasury from 1897 until his death in 1898.

Item #22945.16, $95

Freedom and Public Faith. Speech of William H. Seward, on the Abrogation of the Missouri Compromise, in the Kansas and Nebraska Bills

[WILLIAM H. SEWARD; KANSAS-NEBRASKA], Pamphlet. Freedom and Public Faith. Speech of William H. Seward, on the Abrogation of the Missouri Compromise, in the Kansas and Nebraska Bills. Senate of the United States, February 17, 1854. Washington: Buell & Blanchard. 1854. 16 pp.

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Item #23739.01, $95

English Sociologist and Novelist Martineau Signs a Note

HARRIET MARTINEAU, Autograph Note Signed. Address leaf, n.p. n.d.

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Item #21678.25, $100

An Invitation to Join the Temperance Union

WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION, Printed Postcard Invitation. Unused.

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Item #21678.07, $100

The Israeli Tourism Director Dishes on James Michener

YOHANAN BEHAM, Typed Letter Signed “YBeham” to Sylvia Lyons. Jerusalem, October 23, 1963. On stationery of the Prime Minister’s Office. 1 p., 6½ x 8¼ in.

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Item #20338.01, $100

Reporting Lincoln’s Journey to Washington
for His Inauguration

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Times, New York, N.Y., February 23, 1861. 8 pp.

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Item #30000.79, $100

Lincoln Reviews the Army of the Potomac

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 2, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Collecting confiscated rebel cotton. Ironclad Keokuk sinking after the battle at Charleston. Pres. Lincoln, General Hooker, and their staff at a review of the Army of the Potomac. Bombardment of Fort Sumter.

Item #H-5-2-1863, $100
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