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“MEN OF COLOR: To Arms! To Arms!”

Frederick Douglass, Broadside. “Men of Color / To Arms! To Arms!” U.S. Steam-Power Book and Job Printing Establishment, Ledger Buildings, Third and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, PA, [1863.] Signed in type by Frederick Douglass and 54 others, including many prominent African-American citizens. 44 x 87 in. Framed to 48 x 94 in.

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A monumental Frederick Douglass Civil War recruiting broadside.

African American men had joined Union forces throughout the Civil War, but it took Abraham Lincoln’s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863 to officially allow and encourage them to enlist. This monumental Philadelphia recruiting poster signals the seismic shift in policy.

The text of this dramatic poster was adapted from an impassioned editorial Frederick Douglass wrote in the March of 1863 issue of Douglass’ Monthly. “There is no time to delay… The tide is at its flood … From East to West, from North to South, the sky is written all over, ‘Now or never.’”

Item #22552, PRICE ON REQUEST

AN EXTRAORDINARY RARITY!
Leaves From George Washington’s Own Draft of His First Inaugural Address

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Autograph Manuscript, Pages 27-28, 35-36, and 47-48 of Washington's own draft of his undelivered inaugural address. [written ca. January 1789]. 6 pp. on 3 leaves, 7 x 9 in.

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“This Constitution, is really in its formation a government of the people”

George Washington understood that the new government’s success, as had the Constitutional Convention’s, rested squarely on his shoulders. He also knew that everything he did as the first president would set precedents for future generations. He wrote privately about the promise, ambiguity, and tension of high office, and these same themes are woven throughout his original, undelivered inaugural address. Would the government work as intended, or suffer death from a thousand cuts? Still, the former Commander in Chief recognized the nation’s potential, as well as the honorable men who had come together to build the Constitution.

The three unique leaves—six pages—offered here are written entirely in Washington’s hand. They include assertions that government power is derived from the people, and a highly significant section of the Address explicitly arguing that the Constitution is subject to amendment and, by implication, advocating the adoption of the Bill of Rights. They also include the oratorical climax of the address—arguably the most visionary and impassioned passage of the address.

Item #24818, PRICE ON REQUEST
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The News in 1815: 104 Issues of the Boston Patriot

[WAR OF 1812], Newspapers. January 1815 to December 30, 1815 (Vol. XII, no. 34 - vol. XIV, no. 33). Boston, Mass., Davis C. Ballard. 104 issues, each 4 pp., 14 x 20 1/8 in. Bound in 19th-century quarter calf and marbled boards. With some column-width engraved illustrations.

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Item #20655,

Male Anti-Suffragist Ridicules “Taxation without Representation” Argument of Suffragists

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE]. FREDERICK DWIGHT, Pamphlet. “Taxation and Suffrage,” New York: New York State Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, ca. 1915-1917. 4 pp., 6 x 9 in.

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New York attorney Frederick Dwight insists in this brief pamphlet that women’s inability to vote bears no parallel to the American colonists’ protest of “taxation without representation.”

Item #24174.06, $75

The Israeli Tourism Director Dishes on James Michener

YOHANAN BEHAM, Typed Letter Signed “YBeham” to Sylvia Lyons. Jerusalem, October 23, 1963. On stationery of the Prime Minister’s Office. 1 p., 6½ x 8¼ in.

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Item #20338.01, $80

Freedom and Public Faith. Speech of William H. Seward, on the Abrogation of the Missouri Compromise, in the Kansas and Nebraska Bills

[WILLIAM H. SEWARD; KANSAS-NEBRASKA], Pamphlet. Freedom and Public Faith. Speech of William H. Seward, on the Abrogation of the Missouri Compromise, in the Kansas and Nebraska Bills. Senate of the United States, February 17, 1854. Washington: Buell & Blanchard. 1854. 16 pp.

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Item #23739.01, $95

English Sociologist and Novelist Martineau Signs a Note

HARRIET MARTINEAU, Autograph Note Signed. Address leaf, n.p. n.d.

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Item #21678.25, $100

Reporting Lincoln’s Journey to Washington
for His Inauguration

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. New York Times, New York, N.Y., February 23, 1861. 8 pp.

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Item #30000.79, $100

Lincoln Reviews the Army of the Potomac

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 2, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Collecting confiscated rebel cotton. Ironclad Keokuk sinking after the battle at Charleston. Pres. Lincoln, General Hooker, and their staff at a review of the Army of the Potomac. Bombardment of Fort Sumter.

Item #H-5-2-1863, $100

Blanche Bruce, The First Full-term African American U.S. Senator Signs a Deed

BLANCHE BRUCE, Document Signed. Land deed. Washington, D.C. October 2, 1890. Signature panel 8¼ x 3½ in., overall dimensions 8¼ x 14 in.

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Blanche Bruce was the first full-term African American to serve in the U.S. Senate, 1875-1881. He was then appointed by President James Garfield as Register of the U.S. Treasury in 1881. He later served as the Washington, D.C. Recorder of Deeds (a position earlier held by Frederick Douglass), 1890-1893 and again as Register of the Treasury from 1897 until his death in 1898.

Item #22945.23, $125

Union Soldier Tells His Wife of the Rebel Attack on New Bern, North Carolina

HENRY PICKFORD, Fragment of Autograph Letter Signed, to his wife Sarah Pickford, c. March 1863. 2 pp.

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we had quite an excitement in Newbern about a week ago the rebels made three or four attacks on the City and were finally repulsed we lost one man on board of one of the Gunboats that is all

Item #21265.13, $140

Union Soldier Hopes the Draft Will Replenish His Devastated Regiment

L. A. GRAHAM, Autograph Letter Signed, on patriotic letterhead, to his sister, August 18, 1862, Paterson’s Park Hospital, Baltimore, 3 pp.

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i think that I shal go to my rigment in a weak or to they hant but 73 men left in my rigment so the paper says so that i dont no as i could find them if i should try to....i am glad they are a goen to draft so they will be apt to get som of them that is a fraid they will half to sleap on the ground

Item #21265.29, $150

New York Soldier Tells His Sister They Plan to Finish the War Soon

RICHARD SLADE, Autograph Letter Signed, to his sister Mary A. Slade, March 10, 1865, 3 pp.

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Those four legged Grey backs have about played out but there is a plenty of two legged ones here yet....We are going to try & Cleanse out these Johneys this summer & come home next winter

Item #21265.11, $150

The Border Ruffian Code in Kansas

[BLEEDING KANSAS], Pamphlet. The Border Ruffian Code in Kansas. [New York: Tribune Office. 1856.] 15, [1] pp. Concludes with full page (8.75 x 5.75 in.) map, “Freedom and Slavery, and the Coveted Territories.”

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This tract provides an example of the laws “notoriously forced upon the people of that Territory, at the hands of invading ruffians from Missouri, using the persuasive arguments of the Bowie-Knife and Revolver....” Included are the three Presidential platforms for the 1856 election, and a special map: “Freedom and Slavery, and the Coveted Territories,” printed on the last page.

Item #23739.03, $150

“The South Has Learned Nothing and Forgotten Nothing”

[CIVIL WAR / RECONSTRUCTION], Pamphlet. “Is the South Ready for Restoration?” [Lindley Smith]. Stamped “From Board of Publication of the Union League of Philadelphia.” 20 pp., 5⅞ x 9 in.

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Item #21856.06, $150

Lincoln, the War, and Emancipation

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, June 11, 1864. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Featuring illustrations of Philadelphia Sanitary Fair Central buildings, and Generals Gouverneur Warren and Horatio Wright on the front page. “Belle Plain, Virginia General Grant’s Late Base of Supplies”; “Army of the Potomac—General Warren Rallying the Marylanders”; “President Lincoln and His Secretaries”; Centerfold: “Army of the Potomac—Struggle for the Salient, near Spottsylvania [sic], Virginia, May 12, 1864”; three illustrations of the environs of Spottsylvania [sic] Court House; “Sherman’s Advance—General Logan’s Skirmishes Advancing Toward: the Railroad at Resaca”; and “Sherman’s Advance—Position of Osterhau’s Division on Bald Hill.”

Item #H 6-11-1864, $150

Illustrations of African Americans Freeing Themselves
by Moving Toward Union Lines

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, February 21, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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General Tom Thumb and his bride grace the front page, but “The Effects of the Proclamation—Freed Negroes Coming Into Our Lines at Newbern, North Carolina” is the most significant illustration, occupying all of the fourth page. Also, “Departure of the Great Southern Expedition from Beaufort, North Carolina”; The Rebel Rams Engaging Our Blockading Fleet Off Charleston, South Carolina”; “Hearts and Hands, St. Valentine’s Day, 1863” is the romantic centerfold; “Ft.  Hindman, Arkansas”; “Iron Clad ‘Montauk’ Engaging the Rebel Fort M’Allister in the Ogeechee River.”

Item #H 2-21-1863, $150

Transferring White Officer to New 107th Regiment U.S.C.T.

[LORENZO THOMAS], Document Signed secretarially for Lorenzo Thomas for Lewis G. Brown, Col. 117th USC Infantry, Louisville, Kentucky, October 7, 1864. 1 sheet, 7¾ x 9¾ in.

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Special orders transferring Captain Charles B. Safford from the 117th Regiment to the newly-organized 107th Regiment of U.S. Colored Infantry.

Item #21263.19, $150

Three Special Orders Signed
by Gen. Townsend Re. Capt. Abbott

EDWARD D. TOWNSEND. Brig. Gen. and Assistant Adjutant General, 3 Special Orders Signed, from the Adjutant-General’s Office, War Department, to (and docketed by) Capt. Henry L. Abbott, Colonel of Volunteers, Corps of Topographical Engineers, variously under Generals Barnard, Banks, &c. Henry L. Abbott (1831-1927) commanded the Army of the Potomac’s siege artillery at Petersburg. For this and other recognizable services during the war, he was brevetted brigadier general.

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Item #20577.01-.03, $160

Lincoln Raises the Flag

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, March 9, 1861. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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President Lincoln hoisting the 34-star American flag on Independence Hall, Philadelphia, with his speech. United States arsenal at Little Rock, Arkansas surrendered to the state troops. Interior of the new dome of the capitol at Washington. Front view of Fort Pickens, Pensacola. Inauguration of Pres. Jefferson Davis at Montgomery, Alabama.

Item #H-3-9-1861, $160
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