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Andrew Jackson Considers Loaning His Nephew Money, But Waits to Hear From His Son

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Endorsement Signed with Initials, January 29, 1834. On THOMAS J. DONELSON, Autograph Letter Signed, to Andrew Jackson, January 10, 1834. 4 pp., 7¾ x 10½ in.

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“I find money scarce & times hard here most every body warranted & sued from fifty cents up… they dont give any notice but sue immediately wheather you have the money to pay them or not.” (Donelson to Jackson)

Item #24588.03, $1,900

Andrew Jackson Extols the Constitution’s Guarantee of Religious Freedom, and is Thankful That Pennsylvania “remains firm and immoveable” in its Support

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Letter Signed to the Reverend Ezra Stiles Ely, July 12, 1827. 2 pages with integral address leaf.

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“notwithstanding all the slanders that Power, and its panders, have wickedly invented, & circulated against me—Truth is Mighty & will prevail…”

“Amonghst the greatest blessings secured to us under our constitution is the liberty of worshipping god as our conscience dictates…”

Presidential candidate Andrew Jackson, in the running against incumbent John Quincy Adams, thanks a supporter for a positive report from Pennsylvania. Though Jackson doesn’t detail the slanders against him, they undoubtedly involved his relationship to his wife Rachel. Opponents labeled the couple as adulterers; they were apparently unaware that her divorce had not been finalized when they married in 1791. Realizing the error, they re-married in 1794.

The Reverend Ezra Stiles Ely had preached a July 4 sermon, “The Duty of Christian Freemen to Elect Christian Rulers.” Jackson exhibits a remarkable degree of restraint here, as he acknowledges the solidarity of the different Christian denominations, and, at the same time, hews to the broader policy of religious freedom.

Item #24214, $15,000

Andrew Jackson Dockets a Letter on Redecorating the Hermitage, Refusing to Apologize to the French, and Bringing Home Indemnification Money Due from France to America

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Endorsement Signed with Initials, ca. June 1835. On HENRY TOLAND, Autograph Letter Signed, to Andrew Jackson, May 29, 1835. 4 pp., 7¾ x 10 in.

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“where no apology is due, you are the very last man on earth to make one…. In the present state of Exchange in this Country, I am sure that 2 to 4 % might be made out of the money instead of paying one half per Cent to Rothschilds to bring it here” (Toland to Jackson)

Item #24588.04, $2,200

Andrew Jackson’s Farewell Address on Silk

ANDREW JACKSON, Broadside. Farewell Address of General Andrew Jackson, to the Citizens of the United States. L.G. Hoffman Printer. [after March 4, 1837]. On white silk. Matted, approximately 22 x 16 in.

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“You have no longer any cause to fear danger from abroad... It is from within, among yourselves, from cupidity, from corruption, from disappointed ambition, and inordinate thirst for power, that factions will be formed and liberty endangered.”

“At every hazard and by every sacrifice, this Union must be preserved.”

This powerful speech, delivered on March 4, 1837, is considered a classic example of American oratory. Jackson sternly warns against the expansion of federal government, abuse of taxing power, national banks and, quoting from George Washington’s Farewell Address, the dangers of sectionalism. Ironically, Jackson’s address was drafted in large part by Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney, whose 1857 decision in the Dred Scott case would prove a lightning rod in the country’s bitter division over slavery. Moreover, Jackson himself had arrived in Washington as staunch supporter of states’ rights, but eight years in the presidential seat (and multiple crises over federal power and nullification) had converted him to both a Federalist and defender of the Union.

Item #22916, $1

Andrew Jackson Dockets Letter from His Nephew – Including Report on Slaves at the Hermitage

ANDREW JACKSON, Two Autograph Endorsements Signed with Initials, May 28, 1833. On JOHN DONELSON JR, Autograph Letter Signed, to Andrew Jackson, Hermitage, May 8, 1833. 4 pp., 8 x 10 in.

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“Your negroes are healthy and in good spirits, well enough pleased with their overseer. I expect he is as humane and kind to them as the nature of slavery will admit.” (Donelson to Jackson)

Item #24588.01, $1,950

Andrew Jackson Bashes The Whigs
for Mixing Religion And Politics

ANDREW JACKSON, Letter Signed, as former President, to Mahlon Dickerson. Hermitage, Ten., January 10, 1838. 1 p. With autograph address leaf.

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A bristly letter denouncing his Whig enemies in Tennessee for ruining the career of a young clergyman and editor. “This so displeased a few of the Whig Elders, and Deacons of the church that they, for his becoming Editor, dropped him as a candidate for orders in their Church--some of whom are believed now never to have had three grains of religion.

Item #20890, $7,500

Andrew Jackson Appoints an Indian Agent, Discusses Family Matters, Horse Racing, and the Need for a Good Cotton Crop to Rebuild His Burned Home

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Letter Signed as President, to William Donelson. Washington, D.C., August 31, 1835. 3 pp, 7¾ x 9¾ in., on two conjoined sheets, with address leaf in Jackson’s hand.

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Andrew Jackson needs an agent “well acquainted with the Indian character, and all the laws regulating intercourse with them” to supervise negotiating the first treaty between the U.S. Government and the Plains Indians, as well as the need for liquid cash: “the burning of my House [the Hermitage] & furniture makes a good [cotton] crop now necessary to meet my wants.” He also laments that he may have to sell his colts, along with news about his family.

Item #23213.01, $9,500

President Johnson on Ratification of 14th Amendment by North Carolina and Florida:
Guaranteeing Equal Protection Under the Law

ANDREW JOHNSON, Document Signed as President. July 11, 1868. Ordering Secretary of State to Affix the Seal of the United States to Johnson’s Proclamation announcing ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment by North Carolina and Florida. 1 p.

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Item #24686, $48,000

Andrew Johnson signs a petition supporting a “timber agent for the Southern District of Alabama...

ANDREW JOHNSON, Document Signed, “Andrew Johnson,” together with twenty-six others, 2 pp., 7¾ x 9¾ in., [n.p., n.d.].

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Item #24050.12, $1,300

Feminist Anna Dickinson Refuses to Apologize

ANNA ELIZABETH DICKINSON, Autograph Letter Signed, to A. Boyd. August 1, 1866. 2 pp.

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Item #21678.19, $500

The Acting Governor of New York
Thanks William Penn for a Gift

ANTHONY BROCKHOLLS, Autograph Letter Signed to Governor William Penn. New York, May 1, 1683

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“As the loadstone attracts Iron, so ought acknowledgemts to pursue faviours … [I] dare not presume any further having soe lately recd soe great a marke of your bounty….”

Deputy Governor Anthony Brockholls of New York extends a cordial note to Governor William Penn in the midst of continuing deliberations between Penn and Lord Baltimore over the southern boundary of Pennsylvania and possession of Delaware.

Item #21618, $40,000

Powerful Anti-Slavery Argument Likely by John Laurens

ANTIBIASTES, Newspaper. “Observations on the slaves and the Indentured Servants inlisted in the Army…” Front page printing, in the Boston Gazette and Country Journal, October 13, 1777. Boston: Benjamin Edes. 4 pp., 10 x 15½ in.

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

Many Slaves …share in the dangers and glory of the efforts made by US, the freeborn members of the United States, to enjoy, undisturbed, the common rights of human nature; and THEY remain SLAVES!... The enlightened equity of a free people, cannot suffer them to be ungrateful.

Item #24438, ON HOLD

Future Confederate Naval Commander

ARTHUR SINCLAIR, Autograph Letter Signed to unknown. U.S.S. Pennsylvania, Norfolk, January 22, 1861. 1 p., 7⅞ x 9¾ in.

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Three months before his home state of Virginia seceded, U.S. Naval Commander Arthur Sinclair writes to a Commander in the Navy.

Item #21767, $850

While Running for the Democratic Presidential Nomination, Senator Barack Obama on Transparency and Limiting the Power of Special Interests

BARACK OBAMA, Typed Manuscript with autograph corrections. [Chicago, Ill., ca. May 21, 2007]. 2 pp, 8 ½ x 11 in. With 112 handwritten words in Obama’s red ink and pencil and 3 holes punched at left edge of each sheet. Published on the “Commentary” page of the Chicago Tribune, May 21, 2007.

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“When it comes to reforming Washington … Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis had the right idea. Sixty years ago he said, ‘Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman.’ Brandeis was a progressive responding to the excesses of the Gilded Age. Nearly a century later, we find Washington in need of a lot of sunlight and disinfectant….

I’m not perfect. In my current pres. campaign, I shall have to raise money, and still have relationships w/lobbyists. But at least people will know who those relationships are...”

Over a year before he became the Democratic candidate for President, Senator Barack Obama addressed the issue of lobbyists, special interest groups, and campaign financing.  Obama’s message was published in the Chicago Tribune on May 21, 2007.  Obama’s careful edits, with over 100 words and many strike-outs in his hand, likely came too late for the editorial page deadline of this major metropolitan newspaper. Most of the text Obama wished to be struck remained, and several phrases he did not strike through (noted below in parentheses) were removed, possibly by the editorial page editor.

Item #22930, $7,500

A Wet-Plate Glass Negative of Confederate Spy Belle Boyd

BELLE BOYD, Photographic Negative. Sized for a carte-de-visite, 2½ x 3¾ in. Matthew Brady’s Washington, D.C. Gallery, ca. mid-1860s. Archivally framed and secured in protective glass, 11 x 12½ in.

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Item #21501, $7,500

Belva Lockwood Signed Card

BELVA LOCKWOOD, Autograph Endorsement Signed. Archivally framed with an image and brass plaque.

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Item #23083, $900

A Dredful Decision, First Edition

BENJAMIN C. HOWARD, Book. Report of the Decision of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Opinions of the Judges thereof, in the Case of Dred Scott versus John F.A. Sandford, December Term, 1856., Washington, D.C.: Cornelius Wendell, 1857. With two ownership signatures of “John R. Slack / Sept. 1857.” Slack was a N.J. attorney who had previously helped win a fugitive slave case. First edition. Fine condition. 239 pp. 5½ x 8¾ in.

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In Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857), the Supreme Court declared that blacks could not be United States citizens and that the 1820 Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional. The decision inflamed sectional tensions and helped trigger the Civil War. The decision was published simultaneously in New York and Washington, D.C. Both are considered the First Edition. In his “House Divided” Speech, Lincoln replied that the decision did “obvious violence to the plain unmistakable language” of the Declaration of Independence and our other founding documents.

Item #22178, $3,500

Benjamin Guggenheim, Who Would Perish on the Titanic, Works in His Family Business

BENJAMIN GUGGENHEIM, Autographed Document Signed. Pueblo, Colo. August 29, 1888. 1 p. 8 ¼ x 13 ½ in. With embossed Philadelphia Smelting and Refining Company Seal.

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Item #22388, $3,500

Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures

BENJAMIN OWEN TYLER, Broadside, Drawn by Tyler and engraved by Peter Maverick, [Washington, D.C., 1818]. 1 p., 23⅞ x 31 in., archivally framed to approx. 32 x 40 in.

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“In Congress, July 4th 1776. The Unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America.”

Item #23683, $25,000

Celebrating a Report of McClellan’s Death

BENJAMIN PRENTISS (1819-1901), Autograph Letter Signed (“Prentiss”) Columbus, [Kentucky], March 4, 1862. 1 p., 7¾ x 8¾ in.

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Item #20740, $2,400
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