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Andrew Jackson Bashes The Whigs
for Mixing Religion And Politics

ANDREW JACKSON, Letter Signed, as former President, to Mahlon Dickerson. Hermitage, Ten., January 10, 1838. 1 p. With autograph address leaf.

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A bristly letter denouncing his Whig enemies in Tennessee for ruining the career of a young clergyman and editor. “This so displeased a few of the Whig Elders, and Deacons of the church that they, for his becoming Editor, dropped him as a candidate for orders in their Church--some of whom are believed now never to have had three grains of religion.

Item #20890, $7,500

Andrew Jackson Appoints an Indian Agent, Discusses Family Matters, Horse Racing, and the Need for a Good Cotton Crop to Rebuild His Burned Home

ANDREW JACKSON, Autograph Letter Signed as President, to William Donelson. Washington, D.C., August 31, 1835. 3 pp, 7¾ x 9¾ in., on two conjoined sheets, with address leaf in Jackson’s hand.

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Andrew Jackson needs an agent “well acquainted with the Indian character, and all the laws regulating intercourse with them” to supervise negotiating the first treaty between the U.S. Government and the Plains Indians, as well as the need for liquid cash: “the burning of my House [the Hermitage] & furniture makes a good [cotton] crop now necessary to meet my wants.” He also laments that he may have to sell his colts, along with news about his family.

Item #23213.01, $9,500

Andrew Johnson puts his seal on North Carolina and Florida’s ratification of the 14th Amendment (Equal Protection).

ANDREW JOHNSON, Document Signed as President. July 11, 1868. Ordering Secretary of State to Affix the Seal of the United States to Johnson’s Proclamation announcing ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment by North Carolina and Florida. 1 p.

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Item #24686, $48,000

Andrew Johnson signs a petition supporting a “timber agent for the Southern District of Alabama...

ANDREW JOHNSON, Document Signed, “Andrew Johnson,” together with twenty-six others, 2 pp., 7¾ x 9¾ in., [n.p., n.d.].

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Item #24050.12, $1,300

Feminist Anna Dickinson Refuses to Apologize

ANNA ELIZABETH DICKINSON, Autograph Letter Signed, to A. Boyd. August 1, 1866. 2 pp.

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Item #21678.19, $500

The Acting Governor of New York
Thanks William Penn for a Gift

ANTHONY BROCKHOLLS, Autograph Letter Signed to Governor William Penn. New York, May 1, 1683

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“As the loadstone attracts Iron, so ought acknowledgemts to pursue faviours … [I] dare not presume any further having soe lately recd soe great a marke of your bounty….”

Deputy Governor Anthony Brockholls of New York extends a cordial note to Governor William Penn in the midst of continuing deliberations between Penn and Lord Baltimore over the southern boundary of Pennsylvania and possession of Delaware.

Item #21618, $40,000

Powerful Anti-Slavery Argument Likely by John Laurens

ANTIBIASTES, Newspaper. “Observations on the slaves and the Indentured Servants inlisted in the Army…” Front page printing, in the Boston Gazette and Country Journal, October 13, 1777. Boston: Benjamin Edes. 4 pp., 10 x 15½ in.

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Available as part of The Alexander Hamilton Collection

Many Slaves …share in the dangers and glory of the efforts made by US, the freeborn members of the United States, to enjoy, undisturbed, the common rights of human nature; and THEY remain SLAVES!... The enlightened equity of a free people, cannot suffer them to be ungrateful.

Item #24438

Future Confederate Naval Commander

ARTHUR SINCLAIR, Autograph Letter Signed to unknown. U.S.S. Pennsylvania, Norfolk, January 22, 1861. 1 p., 7⅞ x 9¾ in.

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Three months before his home state of Virginia seceded, U.S. Naval Commander Arthur Sinclair writes to a Commander in the Navy.

Item #21767, $850

While Running for the Democratic Presidential Nomination, Senator Barack Obama on Transparency and Limiting the Power of Special Interests

BARACK OBAMA, Typed Manuscript with autograph corrections. [Chicago, Ill., ca. May 21, 2007]. 2 pp, 8 ½ x 11 in. With 112 handwritten words in Obama’s red ink and pencil and 3 holes punched at left edge of each sheet. Published on the “Commentary” page of the Chicago Tribune, May 21, 2007.

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“When it comes to reforming Washington … Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis had the right idea. Sixty years ago he said, ‘Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman.’ Brandeis was a progressive responding to the excesses of the Gilded Age. Nearly a century later, we find Washington in need of a lot of sunlight and disinfectant….

I’m not perfect. In my current pres. campaign, I shall have to raise money, and still have relationships w/lobbyists. But at least people will know who those relationships are...”

Over a year before he became the Democratic candidate for President, Senator Barack Obama addressed the issue of lobbyists, special interest groups, and campaign financing.  Obama’s message was published in the Chicago Tribune on May 21, 2007.  Obama’s careful edits, with over 100 words and many strike-outs in his hand, likely came too late for the editorial page deadline of this major metropolitan newspaper. Most of the text Obama wished to be struck remained, and several phrases he did not strike through (noted below in parentheses) were removed, possibly by the editorial page editor.

Item #22930, $7,500

A Wet-Plate Glass Negative of Confederate Spy Belle Boyd

BELLE BOYD, Photographic Negative. Sized for a carte-de-visite, 2½ x 3¾ in. Matthew Brady’s Washington, D.C. Gallery, ca. mid-1860s. Archivally framed and secured in protective glass, 11 x 12½ in.

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Item #21501, $7,500

Belva Lockwood Signed Card

BELVA LOCKWOOD, Autograph Endorsement Signed. Archivally framed with an image and brass plaque.

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Item #23083, $900

A Dredful Decision, First Edition

BENJAMIN C. HOWARD, Book. Report of the Decision of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Opinions of the Judges thereof, in the Case of Dred Scott versus John F.A. Sandford, December Term, 1856., Washington, D.C.: Cornelius Wendell, 1857. With two ownership signatures of “John R. Slack / Sept. 1857.” Slack was a N.J. attorney who had previously helped win a fugitive slave case. First edition. Fine condition. 239 pp. 5½ x 8¾ in.

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In Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857), the Supreme Court declared that blacks could not be United States citizens and that the 1820 Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional. The decision inflamed sectional tensions and helped trigger the Civil War. The decision was published simultaneously in New York and Washington, D.C. Both are considered the First Edition. In his “House Divided” Speech, Lincoln replied that the decision did “obvious violence to the plain unmistakable language” of the Declaration of Independence and our other founding documents.

Item #22178, $3,500

Benjamin Guggenheim, Who Would Perish on the Titanic, Works in His Family Business

BENJAMIN GUGGENHEIM, Autographed Document Signed. Pueblo, Colo. August 29, 1888. 1 p. 8 ¼ x 13 ½ in. With embossed Philadelphia Smelting and Refining Company Seal.

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Item #22388, $3,500

Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures

BENJAMIN OWEN TYLER, Broadside, Drawn by Tyler and engraved by Peter Maverick, [Washington, D.C., 1818]. 1 p., 23⅞ x 31 in., archivally framed to approx. 32 x 40 in.

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“In Congress, July 4th 1776. The Unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America.”

Item #23683, $25,000

Celebrating a Report of McClellan’s Death

BENJAMIN PRENTISS (1819-1901), Autograph Letter Signed (“Prentiss”) Columbus, [Kentucky], March 4, 1862. 1 p., 7¾ x 8¾ in.

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Item #20740, $2,400

The First Full-term African American Senator Signs a Deed

BLANCHE BRUCE, Document Signed. Land deed. Washington, D.C. September 30,1890. Signature panel 8¼ x 3½ in., overall dimensions 8¼ x 14 in. Framed.

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Blanche Bruce was the first full-term African American to serve in the U.S. Senate, 1875-1881. He was then appointed by President James Garfield as Register of the U.S. Treasury in 1881. He later served as the Washington, D.C. Recorder of Deeds (a position earlier held by Frederick Douglass), 1890-1893 and again as Register of the Treasury from 1897 until his death in 1898.

Item #22945.04, $525

Blanche Bruce, The First Full-term African American U.S. Senator Signs a Deed

BLANCHE BRUCE, Document Signed. Land deed. Washington, D.C. August 29, 1890. Signature panel 8¼ x 3½ in., overall dimensions 8¼ x 14 in.

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Blanche Bruce was the first full-term African American to serve in the U.S. Senate, 1875-1881. He was then appointed by President James Garfield as Register of the U.S. Treasury in 1881. He later served as the Washington, D.C. Recorder of Deeds (a position earlier held by Frederick Douglass), 1890-1893 and again as Register of the Treasury from 1897 until his death in 1898.

Item #22945.13, $95

Supreme Court Justice Livingston Recommends
a Young New Yorker to James Madison

BROCKHOLST LIVINGSTON, Autograph Letter Signed, to James Madison. New York, November 30, 1808. 1 p.

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Justice Livingston writes a letter of recommendation to President-elect James Madison for Peter Cruger, son of an influential New York City merchant.

Item #21466.05, $500

Supreme Court Justice Livingston Recommends
a Danish Son-in-Law of Jacob Astor
to John Quincy Adams, on Duty in Russia

BROCKHOLST LIVINGSTON, Autograph Letter Signed, to John Quincy Adams. New York, January 19, 1811. 1 p.

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Supreme Court Justice Brockholst Livingston recommends “Mr: Bentzon,” a Danish official and son-in-law of John Jacob Astor, to John Quincy Adams, Minister to Russia. Docketed by John Quincy Adams. “He is since married into the family of Mr. Astor, one of our first & most respectable merchants, & is going with his Lady to Denmark … as Mr. Bentzon intends visiting Petersburgh he is desirous of doing himself the honor of calling on you ...”

Item #21466.06, $1,150

Caleb Cushing, U.S. Congressman,
Calls for Annexation of Canada

CALEB CUSHING, Autograph Letter Signed, to an unidentified recipient, Newburyport, [ Massachusetts], September 28, 1839.

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“I Trust We May Live To See The Stars & Stripes Floating Over The Citadel Over Quebec.”

Item #20021, $1,750
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