Seth Kaller, Inc.

Inspired by History


Browse by Category

Abraham Lincoln

African American History

Albert Einstein

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton Collection Highlights

America's Founding Documents

Books

Civil War and Reconstruction

Declaration of Independence

Early Republic (1784 - c.1830)

Finance, Stocks, and Bonds

George Washington

Gettysburg

Gilded Age (1876 - c.1900)

Great Gifts

Inauguration and State of the Union Addresses

Israel and Judaica

Maps

Pennsylvania

Presidents and Elections

Prints

Revolution and Founding Fathers (1765 - 1784)

Science, Technology, and Transportation

War of 1812

Women's History and First Ladies

World War I and II

Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln

Sort by:
« Back
Page of 4 (77 items) — show per page
Next »

The Gettysburg Address, with Full Centerfold Illustrations of the Battlefield and Lincoln’s Dedication Ceremony

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, New York, December 5, 1863. 16 pp., complete.

   More...

“and that Government of the people, for the people, and for all people, shall not perish from earth.”

As printing technology advanced through the middle decades of the nineteenth century, illustrated newspapers grew in popularity even though their engravings added a few weeks to press time. Leslie’s printing—from December 5—includes an article containing the full text of Lincoln’s timeless speech (page 11). Illustrations include a centerfold spread with the formal dedication ceremony prominently placed, and smaller views of Union and rebel graves, defensive works, Meade’s headquarters, and a view of the town (centerfold).  A large illustration of “The War in Tennessee—Lookout Mountain and Its Vicinity” appears on the front page.

There is no definitive text that captures exactly how Lincoln spoke that day, though the AP reporter’s text is most familiar. Leslie’s printing, following the Philadelphia Enquirer version, contains variations, most notably in the final two sentences regarding the nation’s unfinished work and closing phrase of “Government of the people, for the people, and for all people” rather than “of the people, by the people, and for the people.”

Item #23577.01, $2,750

The Gettysburg Address – Front Page News

GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, The New York Times, November 20, 1863. (Gettysburg Address on p. 1, col. 3. Reporting on the event starts on p. 1, col. 2. Everett’s speech on pp. 2-3.) 8 pp., 15¼ x 20¾ in.

   More...

“It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on.”

A rare first day of publication newspaper, with Lincoln’s timeless embodiment of American ideals prominently placed. This printing from November 20, the day after the Address, contains Lincoln’s speech on the front page. This original issue also includes Edward Everett’s speech and a report on the ceremonies.

Item #23318, $9,500

Battle of Gettysburg Prisoner of War Broadside:
Confederate Guards Shooting Unarmed Yankees

[GETTYSBURG], Broadside. The Gettysburg Prisoners. March from Gettysburg to Staunton, 175 Miles..., Annapolis, Maryland, September 28, 1863, 14½ x 6 in., 1 pp.

   More...

“At the request of a large number of my fellow Bell Island, prisoners of War, I have written a short sketch from my notes taken on the spot, and have put the same in type. The account imbraces [sic] from the 2nd of July at Gettysburg, Pa., up to September 21st, on Bell Island. The statement is facts only, and not from an imaginary brain….

Union private George Gantt exposes the dismal treatment of Union prisoners of war after the Battle of Gettysburg.

Item #22245, $1,750

Lincoln Orders a National Day of Thanksgiving in Honor of the Union Victory at Gettysburg

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. [THANKSGIVING], Broadside. Proclamation of Thanksgiving. Massachusetts, [probably Boston], ca. July 27-August 6, 1863. 1 p., 20 x 28 in.

   More...

Lincoln’s first call for a national day of Thanksgiving.

Item #23584, $8,500

A Union Officer’s Commission, and Field Report from
the 17th Connecticut Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg

[CIVIL WAR – GETTYSBURG], Allen G. Brady, Autograph Manuscript, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1863. 6 pp., in pencil, an unsigned draft or retained copy.

   More...

A field report from the Battle of Gettysburg by Major Allen G. Brady, commander of the 17th Connecticut Regiment, written on the 4th of July, 1863, the day after the battle ended in a great victory for the Union.

“We had not more than time to form before the enemy were discovered advancing rapidly upon us on our right & a full Brigade obliquely towards our left….our fire was so destructive it checked their advance the troops on our left giving way the enemy came in behind us but we still remained firmly at the stone wall until the rebels were driven back.”

Item #21808, $7,500

Race Baiting Takes Center Stage in the
1864 Presidential Election

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Broadside. Democratic Catechism of Negro Equality. Philadelphia, Pa., July 4, 1863., 6½ x 9 in.

   More...

Republicans counter the ridiculous charge that Lincoln favored African Americans over white Americans. Instead, they use many individual instances to assert an equally absurd claim of a long history of Democratic support of African American rights.

Item #22807, $1,500

President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed “A. Lincoln” as President, to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, May 23, 1863. “Executive Mansion, Washington” stationery, 2 pp. on one sheet, 7¾ x 9¾ in. With front panel of original envelope, to which Lincoln has added an Autograph Note Signed, and Stanton has also added an Autograph Note Signed.

   More...

Less than six years after he successfully sued the Illinois Central for legal fees, President Lincoln faces another problem with the railroad, now vital for the transportation of Union troops. In another dispute over payments, he tells his Secretary of War, “If I had the leisure which I have not, I believe I could settle it; but prima facie it appears to me we better settle the account ourselves...”

Item #22131, $60,000

Lincoln Reviews the Army of the Potomac

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 2, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

Collecting confiscated rebel cotton. Ironclad Keokuk sinking after the battle at Charleston. Pres. Lincoln, General Hooker, and their staff at a review of the Army of the Potomac. Bombardment of Fort Sumter.

Item #H-5-2-1863, $100

Illustrations of African Americans Freeing Themselves
by Moving Toward Union Lines

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, February 21, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

General Tom Thumb and his bride grace the front page, but “The Effects of the Proclamation—Freed Negroes Coming Into Our Lines at Newbern, North Carolina” is the most significant illustration, occupying all of the fourth page. Also, “Departure of the Great Southern Expedition from Beaufort, North Carolina”; The Rebel Rams Engaging Our Blockading Fleet Off Charleston, South Carolina”; “Hearts and Hands, St. Valentine’s Day, 1863” is the romantic centerfold; “Ft.  Hindman, Arkansas”; “Iron Clad ‘Montauk’ Engaging the Rebel Fort M’Allister in the Ogeechee River.”

Item #H 2-21-1863, $150

The Emancipation Proclamation:
A Miniature Edition of the Document that Saved America

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Pamphlet. Proclamation of Emancipation, by the President of the United States, January 1st, 1863. [Boston, Mass., John Murray Forbes, ca. Jan. 20, 1863]. 8 pp., plus printed wraps, 2¼ x 3¼ in.

   More...

“All persons held as slaves within said designated States

and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free.”

Item #24310, $22,000

The Emancipation Proclamation

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, January 17, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

Two black teamsters duel on the front page; the text of the Emancipation Proclamation is printed on page 2; the execution of 38 Indian murderers at Mankato, Minnesota on page 4, Thomas Nast centerfold: “The War in the West, the War in the Border States.”

Also, illustrations: Winslow Homer, “A Shell in the Rebel Trenches”; a map of Mississippi; the “Reception of the Authorities of New Orleans by General Butler”; “General Bank’s Forces Landing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana”; “Brigadier General James Blunt”; “Brigadier General John M’Neil”; and a cartoon of a black man celebrating his emancipation by declaring himself no longer part of a farm’s livestock, but instead a man.

Item #H 1-17-1863, $250

A Copperhead Newspaper Prints, Then Criticizes,
the Emancipation Proclamation

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, Newspaper. New York Journal of Commerce. New York, N.Y., January 3, 1863. 4 pp., 24 x 32½ in.

   More...

An early report of the Emancipation Proclamation, where the editors describe Lincoln’s bold move as “a farce coming in after a long tragedy....Most of the people regard it as a very foolish piece of business.”

Item #22448.01, $1,450

The First War Department Printing of the Emancipation Proclamation, Bound with 400-plus 1862-1863 General Orders, including the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Printed Document. Emancipation Proclamation. Signed in type by Lincoln, Secretary of State William H. Seward, and Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas. General Order No. 1, War Department, Adjutant General’s Office, Washington January 2, 1863 (but based on usual practice, more likely printed ca. January 7th.). 3pp.

   More...

This book of official War Department orders was bound together for Army paymaster Major N.S. Brinton.

Item #23692, $4,500

Chicago Lithograph of the Emancipation Proclamation

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Broadside, “National Proclamation of Emancipation.” Chicago: Rufus Blanchard. ca. 1863-64. Color lithograph, 11½ x 15½ in., on parchment-like paper.

   More...

An elaborate and colorful Chicago pre-fire imprint of Lincoln’s historic proclamation. Embellished with three-quarter borders of scrolling oak leaves and acorns, twining with large letters proclaiming “Freedom” and “Forever”; the oak leaves hand-colored in green; at the top and bottom are engraved vignettes (symbols of industry and the arts, a village scene, an American eagle, and a harbor scene); the central portion with a field of pale blue with a ground of stars and a sunburst design at top.

Item #24989, $3,750

Senate Republicans resolve to solve Abraham Lincoln’s 1862 Cabinet Crisis.

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. JACOB COLLAMER, Autograph Manuscript. Original retained copy of recommendations by Republican Senators, to President Abraham Lincoln, December 18, 1862. With JAMES M. GRIMES. Autograph Endorsement Signed. 3 pp. And with: JAMES GRIMES. Autograph Letter Signed, to Attorney General William M. Evarts. September 26, 1868. Burlington, Iowa; enclosing the preceding letter. 1 p. plus docketing. 8 x 10 in. Grimes’ free franked autograph addressed envelope also included.

   More...

The Republican Senators of the United States, entertaining the most unqualified confidence in the patriotism & integrity of the President...feel it is their duty, from the positions they occupy, respectfully to present [these propositions] for executive consideration & action.

– [Senator Jacob Collamer], December 18, 1862

I told you that I somewhere had an original of the paper presented by the republican senators to Mr. Lincoln demanding unity in his councils &c. I have just fallen upon it & enclose it to you.

– Senator James W. Grimes, to William M. Evarts

Item #24347.01-.02, $14,500

Broadsheet of Lincoln’s 1862 State of the Union Message

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Broadsheet, “Sentinel Extra” [place unknown[1]], ca. December 2, 1862, 9⅛ x 24 in. 2 pp.

   More...

We cannot escape history… In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free… We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best, hope of earth...”

One month before signing the Emancipation Proclamation, the president proposes colonization and his plan for compensated emancipation, discusses foreign affairs, reports on progress of the Pacific Railroad, the war and finance. This rare “Sentinel Extra” broadsheet (apparently unrecorded in OCLC) has other news of the day on the verso, including a fantastic article quoting General Meagher’s reaction to the resignation of several officers after McClellan was removed.

Item #22179, $5,500

A Confederate Newspaper Prints Lincoln’s Response
to Horace Greeley’s Anti-Slavery Editorial

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Richmond Whig, Richmond, Va., August 30, 1862. 2 pp., 17 x 24 in.

   More...

On the front page under “News from the North” is the text of Abraham Lincoln’s reply to New York Tribune editor Horace Greeley. Greeley’s letter urging Lincoln to emancipate all slaves in Union-held territory was known as “The Prayer of Twenty Millions.” It was first published on August 20, 1862. Lincoln responded on August 22, declaring that his paramount goal is to save the Union, regardless of its effect on slavery, as well as his personal views that all men should be free.

Item #30007.01, $650

A Naval Physician Describes Tension
Between Lincoln and Admiral Goldsborough

A. S. HEATH. [CIVIL WAR], Autograph Letter Signed, to his wife. 4 pp., 7½ x 9¾ in., “U.S. Steamer Daylight, Beaufort Harbor,” Beaufort, [North Carolina], May 23, 1862.

   More...

“the President [Lincoln] gives old [Admiral] Goldsborough fits, threatening to cashier him &c &c.  Good for the President. Had he known what I have, about him (G) he would have come to the same conclusion six months ago.”

Item #22958, $500

Lincoln’s Compensated Emancipation Proposal

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, Pa., March 7, 1862. 8 pp., 15½ x 20½ in. With “Message from the President...Resolved, That the United States ought to co-operate with any State which may adopt gradual abolition of slavery.” [Printing Lincoln’s March 5 message to Congress on page 1.]

   More...

The United States is the only nation in history to end slavery through Civil War. Nations as diverse as Russia, the British Empire, France, Brazil, and others around the world ended their reliance on slave labor through legislative means that included some form of compensation to slave owners for their lost “assets.” Here, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports on the front page that Lincoln presented a special message to Congress with a plan to end slavery through compensation. There would be no takers among the slaveholding border states.

Item #30001.28, $500

Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, as President, to Secretary of State William H. Seward, “Executive Mansion,” Washington, D.C., March 5, 1862. Signed at bottom by “William H. Seward,” with a note in an unidentified contemporary hand. 1 p. 4¾ x 7¼ in.

   More...

The United States is the only nation in history to end slavery through Civil War. Nations as diverse as Russia, the British Empire, France, Brazil, and others around the world ended their reliance on slave labor through legislative means that included some form of compensation to slaveowners for their lost “assets.” Here, President Lincoln requests that Secretary of State William Seward summon a meeting of the Cabinet. The following day, the president presented a special message to Congress with his plan end slavery through compensation. There were no takers among the slaveholding border states. The brevity of Lincoln’s letter belies its far-reaching implications and the tantalizing possibilities of “what might have been.”

Item #23747, $90,000
« Back
Page of 4 (77 items) — show per page
Next »