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Civil War and Reconstruction

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Confederate Flag Given by Infamous Spy Belle Boyd to a Union Officer

ELEVEN-STAR “FIRST NATIONAL” FLAG WITH SINGLE STAR “BONNIE BLUE” FIRST UNOFFICIAL CONFEDEDERATE FLAG VERSO, Belle Boyd, the “Siren of the Shenandoah,” gave the flag to Captain Frederic Sears Grand d’Hauteville on June 18, 1862, telling him that it was the flag she waived to urge on Confederate troops at the Battle of Front Royal a month earlier. D’Hauteville’s 25-page autograph manuscript war memoir, with his account of the gift of the flag quoted above, is included. (See below for complete transcript). With additional photographs and manuscripts. Homemade, perhaps even by Boyd or a family member, and used only briefly before being given to d’Hauteville, the flag has been perfectly preserved, retaining the short ribbons along its hoist and showing no tears, holes, fraying, loss, or staining. Over 5 x 3 feet.

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June 18. Reached Front Royal, & met there the famous & very handsome, rebel spy, Belle Boyd, who gave to me the rebel flag, waving which, she led the attack upon Kenly in May.

The “stars and bars” circular canton pattern with eleven-stars was used for First National flags from July 2, 1861, when Tennessee and North Carolina joined the Confederacy, until November 28, 1861, when stars were added for Missouri and Kentucky. The other side of this rare two-pattern configuration is a tribute to the “Bonnie blue flag that bears the single star,” the unofficial first Confederate flag.

Frederic d’Hauteville’s small autograph note has been loosely stitched to the flag: “Confederate flag. Taken by F.S.G dH. and given by him to E.S.F. in 1862(?). To be given to Freddie d’Hauteville when he is fifteen.” His first wife, Elizabeth Stuyvesant Fish, died in 1863. Freddy, his son by his second wife, was born in 1873, thus dating his note about the second gifting of the flag to between 1873 and 1888. The flag remained in his family, preserved in perfect condition, until 2015, when contents from their Swiss castle were sold, clearing the way for the property to be sold; it is now on the market for $60 million dollars.

Item #24356.99, $180,000

Lincoln, Sherman, and Grant on Civil War Era Patriotic Milk Glass Vase

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN, WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, AND ULYSSES S. GRANT], Pale green patriotic milk glass vase with hand-colored transfer portraits of Lincoln, Sherman, and Grant. Height 10½ inches, covered with hand-painted designs including an eagle, American shield, unfurled flag, banner inscribed “E Pluribus Unum,” with lilacs, gold banding and Greek key motifs. No markings or indication of origin, but likely produced towards the end of the Civil Civil War. Ca. 1865.

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Item #24349, $7,500

Abraham Lincoln and Archduke Franz Joseph:
A Unique Link Between Our Martyred President and the Assassination That Started WWI

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Partially Printed Document Signed “Abraham Lincoln,” Washington, D.C., February 18, 1864. 1 p. 8 x 10 in.

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President Abraham Lincoln directs Secretary of State William H. Seward to attach the seal of the United States to the envelope for a letter to the Austrian Emperor. This remarkable document forms an extraordinary connection between two important world events—the American Civil War and World War I.  In the letter to which this order relates, Lincoln congratulated Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria on the birth of his nephew Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  The assassination of this archduke fifty years later in Sarajevo sparked World War I.

Item #24501, $12,500

Unique Sea Mosses Book Sold at the New York Metropolitan Fair to Benefit Sick and Wounded Union Troops

[CIVIL WAR]. ANNA BIGELOW, Autograph Manuscript Signed unique calligraphy book with illustrations, pressed sea weeds, and hand lettered four lines of verse titled ‘Sea Weeds.’ New York, N.Y, 1864. 7½ x 10½ on 60-plus pages with 31 moss examples interleaved.

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“call us not weeds, we are flowers of the Sea.”

Item #24170, $1,750

9th U.S. Colored Infantry - William Royal Civil War Archive

[U.S. COLORED TROOPS]. CAPTAIN WILLIAM ROYAL, Archive. 45 Items from 1863-1869, primarily relating to Company F of the 9th U.S. Colored Infantry, including numerous inventories, correspondence, and pay receipts. Images shown on the website are only a sample of the complete archive. Royal, a white officer (as was typical), was in command of his company as part of the Union occupation of Richmond starting on April 3, when the Confederates abandoned their capital. He remained through the regiment’s service occupying Brownsville Texas under General Sheridan after the war. Also included are Royal’s marriage certificate and Bachelor of Laws degree, and five letters to him, including a friend mourning news of Lincoln’s assassination.

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Item #22249, $2,850

Ironclad Nantucket Commander Donald M. Fairfax, en Route to Attack Charleston Harbor, Writes of the Monitor (two weeks after Battle of Hampton Roads) and Slavery

[CIVIL WAR]. DONALD MACNEIL FAIRFAX, Autograph Letter Signed, as Commander of U.S.S. Nantucket, to “Cooke,” 4 pp., 7¾ x 9¾ in. Port Royal, [S.C.]. March 26, 1863.

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“I do not think the Ironclad Monitor deserving of the credit of sea boat although they can stand a great deal…I am rather on the old democratic order – go for the Union always – but religiously believe in observing the Constitution literally – This horrible negro question I ever have deplored and view those in the North as inimical to the success of our Republic who have kept up this strife – of course there is no excuse for the South but certainly the abolitionist is much to blame”

Item #24265, $1,750

Fisk University Co-Founder John Ogden Asks Merriam Publishers if the Gift of a Pictorial Dictionary Was Meant for Him or the University

JOHN OGDEN, Autograph Letter Signed, to George and Charles Merriam. Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 18, 1869. 1 p., 8½ x 5¼ in. On Fisk University letterhead.

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In this brief note, Ogden thanks the famous Springfield, Massachusetts dictionary publishers the Merriams for a gift of a copy of their Pictorial Dictionary. Ogden references one “Mr. Gamble” as having stated that the volume was intended as a personal gift, but notes that the dictionary has “the name of our institution inscribed upon, or rather in it, from which I infer you intended it for the institution.” He then asks the Merriams to “decide the quarrel.”

Item #24172.01-.02, $550

The Emancipation Proclamation:
A Miniature Edition of the Document that Saved America

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Pamphlet. Proclamation of Emancipation, by the President of the United States, January 1st, 1863. [Boston, Mass., John Murray Forbes, ca. Jan. 20, 1863]. 8 pp., plus printed wraps, 2¼ x 3¼ in.

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“All persons held as slaves within said designated States

and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free.”

Item #24310, $22,000

“General Grants election has brought such actual Peace, that there is not a part of a peg even, to hang an excitement on”

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter, to an unnamed general. Annapolis, Maryland, December 8, 1868. 2 pp., quarto. Sherman originally wrote this content as part of a longer letter; he marked this leaf “copy” and ends it with marks that show this section to be complete.

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Sherman turns down an invitation to a “Grand Reunion of the Western Armies at Chicago.”

Item #23562.02, $1,650

“War is a hard master.”

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to his foster brother and former General Thomas Ewing Jr. Saint Louis, Missouri, June 30, 1867, 4 pp., quarto.

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The Commander of the Department of the Missouri and the future Commanding General of the U.S. Army is not about to show favoritism to family when it comes to duty. He has some stern advice for his younger foster brother, Charley, delivered through his older brother.

Item #23562.01, $1,850

Sherman’s Farewell to His Troops:
Copy for 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps

WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Manuscript Document Signed, secretarially, Special Field Orders No. 76. Washington, D.C. May 30, 1865. 4p. Countersigned by Horace G. H. Tarr Captain and AAA General, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps. (Hooker’s Corps) May 31, 1865.

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Captain and assistant adjutant Horace G.H. Tarr, of the 20th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, was the final signer of this brigade-level copy of Sherman’s farewell message to his troops and orders for their triumphant march, the Grand Review, through Washington, D.C. Organized at New Haven September 8, 1862, the 20th Connecticut had been attached to the 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, since it was organized by Joseph Hooker in April 1864. Prior to that, the 20th Connecticut had been part of the 12th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. Of the two units known as the 20th Army Corps., this was the second and far more successful unit, affectionately known as “Hooker’s Corps.” At the time of this order, Joseph A. Mower was the Corps commander, leading the unit in the famed Grand Review of the Armies in Washington, D.C. before disbanding in June 1865.

Item #23912, $8,500

Gideon Welles Announces Lincoln’s Assassination to the Navy

[GIDEON WELLES], Printed Document Signed in print as Secretary of the Navy. General Order No. 51, Navy Department. Washington, D.C. April 15, 1865. Black border, issued just hours after the president’s death. One page with integral blank, 5½ x 8½ in.

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Item #23915, $2,500

Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, as President, to Secretary of State William H. Seward, “Executive Mansion,” Washington, D.C., March 5, 1862. Signed at bottom by “William H. Seward,” with a note in an unidentified contemporary hand. 1 p. 4¾ x 7¼ in.

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The United States is the only nation in history to end slavery through Civil War. Nations as diverse as Russia, the British Empire, France, Brazil, and others around the world ended their reliance on slave labor through legislative means that included some form of compensation to slaveowners for their lost “assets.” Here, President Lincoln requests that Secretary of State William Seward summon a meeting of the Cabinet. The following day, the president presented a special message to Congress with his plan end slavery through compensation. There were no takers among the slaveholding border states. The brevity of Lincoln’s letter belies its far-reaching implications and the tantalizing possibilities of “what might have been.”

Item #23747, $90,000

General Grant Responds to an Inquiry from the Brother of a Confederate Soldier Slain During the Siege of Vicksburg

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Autograph Letter Signed to Charles J. Hoadly. Vicksburg, Miss., August 3, 1863. 1 p., 7¾ x 9¾ in. With transmittal envelope postmarked from Memphis on August 8. With related archive of 32 Frederick W. Hoadley Autograph Letters Signed from South Carolina, to his brother Charles in Hartford, 1851-1854, on various subjects. One early receipt for carpentry, including a cherry casket. And two almost-identical unsigned carte-de-visite bust photographs of Frederick, with W. G. Grotecloss of New York photographer’s imprint on verso.

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After having learned of his Confederate brother’s death through press accounts, Connecticut State Librarian Charles Hoadly took the unusual step of writing directly to General Grant during the Siege of Vicksburg to discover more about Frederick W. Hoadley’s death and burial.

Item #23520, $9,000

Civil War General and Later U.S. Commissioner of Patents Explains Troop Delays

MORTIMER D. LEGGETT, Autograph Letter Signed as Brig Gen. to Colonel W.T. Clark, A.A.G. Canton, [Mississippi], Headquarters 3d Division 17th Army Corps, [Army of the Tennessee] February 28, 1864. An explanation on delays in troop backup.

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Item #21386.11, $375

After his Costly Victory at Shiloh, Grant Orders Hurlbut to Move towards Corinth

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Autograph Letter Signed as Commander of the Army of the Tennessee, to Stephen A. Hurlbut. “Head Quarters, Army of the Ten[nessee],” Pittsburg [Landing, Tennessee], April 29, 1862. 1 p., 7¾ x 10 in.

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While under blistering criticism for sustaining so many casualties at the Battle of Shiloh, Grant orders General Stephen Hurlbut to move his 4th division in preparation for the advance on Corinth, Mississippi. The next day, however, Halleck would relieve Grant of command of the Army of Tennessee while nominally promoting him to second-in-command of the Department of the Mississippi. Grant was left virtually powerless. While this order demonstrates Grant’s intentions, Halleck moved so slowly that the Confederate army was allowed to escape. 

Item #23516, $9,000

The Gettysburg Address – First Day of Printing, Lowell

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, Lowell Daily Citizen & News, Lowell, Mass., November 20, 1863. 4 pp., 17 ½ x 23 in.

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“It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us; that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain...”

This rare first day of publication newspaper contains Lincoln’s timeless embodiment of American ideals on page 2. This printing from November 20, a day after the speech, includes a report on the ceremonies, and mentions Edward Everett’s speech (calling it “long,”). The text of this Massachusetts newspaper closely follows the Boston Daily Advertiser’s text, which varies slightly from the AP versions.

Item #23307, $10,000

The Gettysburg Address – Front Page News

GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, The New York Times, November 20, 1863. (Gettysburg Address on p. 1, col. 3. Reporting on the event starts on p. 1, col. 2. Everett’s speech on pp. 2-3.) 8 pp., 15¼ x 20¾ in.

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“It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on.”

A rare first day of publication newspaper, with Lincoln’s timeless embodiment of American ideals prominently placed. This printing from November 20, the day after the Address, contains Lincoln’s speech on the front page. This original issue also includes Edward Everett’s speech and a report on the ceremonies.

Item #23318, $9,500

The Success of Black Troops At Petersburg, Virginia, Under Butler

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside. New England Loyal Publication Society No. 200. Boston, Mass., June 27, 1864. 1 p., 9 x 10¾ in.

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“They grinned and pushed on, and with a yell that told the southern chivalry their doom, [they] rolled irresistibly over and into the work.”

Item #23626, $750

Calling for More Black Troops in the Union Army: Criticizing NY for Turning Away African American Soldiers and Praising a Tennessee Regiment

[CIVIL WAR], Broadside. New England Loyal Publication Society No. 143. Boston, Mass., December 2, 1863. 1 p., 9½ x 15 in.

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“These volunteers who were not permitted to volunteer happened to have black skins, and for that reason they were refused. Is it not almost time to have done with this absurd superstition, this fanatical folly?”

Item #23625, $950
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