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James Madison’s First Inaugural Address, Asserting Neutral Rights in Prelude to the War of 1812

JAMES MADISON, Newspaper. The Repertory, March 14, 1809. Boston, Massachusetts: John & Andrew W. Park. 4 pp., 13¼ x 20¼ in.

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Indulging no passions which trespass on the rights or the repose of other nations, it has been the true glory of the United States to cultivate peace by observing justice, and to entitle themselves to the respect of the nations at war by fulfilling their neutral obligations with the most scrupulous impartiality.

When President Thomas Jefferson followed George Washington’s example and declined to seek a third term, he selected James Madison as his successor. Reflecting challenges within his own party, Madison won the Presidency over fellow Democratic-Republican DeWitt Clinton, who was endorsed by some state Federalist parties, by a narrow margin.

Item #30001.61, $795

Andrew Jackson’s First Inaugural Address in Maryland Newspaper

ANDREW JACKSON, Newspaper. Niles’ Weekly Register, March 7, 1829. Baltimore, Maryland: Hezekiah Niles & Son. 16 pp. (17-32), 6¼ x 9⅞ in.

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As long as our Government is administered for the good of the people, and is regulated by their will; as long as it secures to us the rights of person and of property, liberty of conscience and of the press, it will be worth defending....

Andrew Jackson’s election in 1828 over incumbent John Quincy Adams marked an end to the “Era of Good Feelings,” as Jackson’s supporters became the Democratic Party, while those who supported Adams became the National Republicans. In March 1829, Jackson became the first president to take the oath of office on the East Portico of the U.S. Capitol. His inaugural address promised to respect the rights of states and the constitutional limits on the presidency.

Item #30001.60, $245

Harvard College Laws Belonging to Student Caleb Cushing, Future Congressman and U.S. Attorney General, also Signed by Harvard’s President

[HARVARD UNIVERSITY], Pamphlet Signed. Laws of Harvard College. For the Use of Students. Copy belonging to Sophomore Caleb Cushing, with his signature and that of John Kirkland, President, on page 68. Cambridge: University Press, [ca. September 30] 1814. 84 pp., 5½ x 9 in.

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Item #25600, $2,750

“John Bull and the Baltimoreans” Lampooning British Defeat at Fort McHenry in Baltimore Following their Earlier Success at Alexandria

[WAR OF 1812]. WILLIAM CHARLES, Print. John Bull and the Baltimoreans. Satirical engraved aquatint cartoon. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [October, 1814]. 1 p., 12½ x 9 in.

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Mercy! mercy on me. What fellows those Baltimoreans are. After the example of the Alexandrians I thought I had nothing to do but enter the Town and carry off the Booty. And here is nothing but Defeat and Disgrace!!

A masterpiece of design and composition.

Item #25448, $4,500

“Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians” War of 1812 Cartoon Ridiculing Alexandria’s Surrender without a Fight

[WAR OF 1812]. WILLIAM CHARLES, Print. Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians, satirical engraved aquatint cartoon. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [October, 1814]. 1 p., 13 x 9 in.

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Push on Jack, the yankeys are not all so Cowardly as these Fellows here. let’s make the best of our time.

This cartoon mocks the citizens of Alexandria, who easily capitulated to a small British fleet in August 1814. As part of the terms of surrender, John Bull, dressed as a sailor with a sword in one hand and “Terms of Capitulation” in the other, confiscates their property.

Williams Charles’ images were based loosely on Thomas Rowlandson’s 1798 satire, “High Fun for John Bull or the Republicans Put to Their last Shift.”

Item #25449, $3,750

“John Bull Making A New Batch of Ships to send to the Lakes” – a Scottish-born American Illustrator Satirizes British Losses on Great Lakes and Lake Champlain

[WAR OF 1812]. WILLIAM CHARLES, Print. John Bull making a new Batch of Ships to send to the Lakes, engraved satirical aquatint cartoon. Philadelphia, [October, 1814]. 1 p., 12¾ x 9¼ in. Excellent condition.

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Oliver Hazard Perry’s victory in the Battle of Lake Erie caused the loss of the British fleet there in September, 1813. Then, in September 1814, Thomas Macdonough’s victory at the Battle of Plattsburgh on Lake Champlain caused the British, with French Canadian allies and financiers, and British arms makers, to fear that the Yankees might take Canada next. This beautifully colored print by William Charles shows King George III frantically baking more ships to replace those lost to American victories on the Great Lakes. It is a companion to John Bull and the Baltimoreans and Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians.

Item #25451, $3,500

“Let every Federalist do his Duty,
and Massachusetts will yet be Saved!”

[WAR OF 1812], Broadside. Boston, April, 1811. Untrimmed with wide margins. At bottom, prints resolutions of a public meeting at Faneuil Hall on March 31, 1811, which threatened resistance against Congress’s May, 1810 legislation. With docketing on verso. 1 p., 11¾ x 18⅜ in.

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Fiery election broadside fanning the flames of Federalist opposition to Democratic-Republican foreign policy during the Jefferson and Madison administrations. In tone if not in substance, this jeremiad against Southern planters is not wholly different from the complaints of Southern fire-eaters against Lincoln and the “black Republicans” 50 years later. It shows the intensity of New England sectionalism a year before “Mr. Madison’s War.” “The Embargo cost you millions and millions of dollars. It sunk all the property in New England twenty per cent. It ruined and crippled thousands forever. It drove your sailors into foreign employ … You have been robbed of this treasure by Thomas Jefferson…”

Item #21861, $2,500

Pownall’s New Map of North America, 1794

THOMAS POWNALL, Map. A New Map of North America with the West India Islands, divided according to the Preliminary Articles of Peace, Signed at Versailles, 20, Jan 1783, wherein are particularly Distinguished The United States, and the Several Provinces, Governments &ca which Compose the British Dominions, Laid down according to the Latest Surveys, and Corrected from the Original Materials of Goverr. Pownall, Membr. of Parlimt. London: Laurie and Whittle, 12th May, 1794.

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Item #23539, $1,750

John Marshall’s Supreme Court Decides Osborn et al. v. The Bank of the United States, landmark 11th Amendment Case

[JOHN MARSHALL], Newspaper. Daily National Intelligencer, March 22, 1824. Washington, DC: Gales & Seaton. Opinion for the Supreme Court in Osborn et al. v. The Bank of the United States fills pages 3 and 4. 4 pp.

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[T]he Eleventh Amendment, which restrains the jurisdiction granted by the Constitution over suits against States, is, of necessity, limited to those suits in which a State is a party on the record.

Ohio levied taxes on each branch of the U.S. Bank in the state. The Court had already ruled in McCulloch v. Maryland that such taxes were unconstitutional, but Ohio persisted in enforcing the tax. Ralph Osborn, the State Auditor, seized funds from the Bank. The circuit court ordered Osborn and his colleagues to repay the amount seized. The question is Osborn was, did the federal circuit court’s assertion of jurisdiction violate the Eleventh Amendment? In a 6-to-1 decision, the Court upheld the circuit and ruled that the Ohio law was “repugnant to the Constitution.” Osborn and his colleagues were thus “incontestably liable for the full amount of the money taken out of the bank.”

This issue includes a first printing of the landmark Supreme Court decision in the case of Osborn et al. v. The Bank of the United States. The Court announced its decision on Friday, March 19, 1824, and this printing appeared on Monday, March 22.

Item #24689, $1,950

59 Western Pennsylvania Settlers Petition the Governor to Supplement Frontier Defense

[PENNSYLVANIA], “To his Excellency Thomas Mifflin Governor of the State of Pennsylvania. The petition of a Number of the Inhabitants on the Fronteers of Westmoreland County Humbly Sheweth…” Folio manuscript broadside, docketed on verso, entirely handwritten in ink, signed by 58 petitioners (mostly individually, though it appears that a few small groups may have one signer writing his own name and then that of a couple additional people who perhaps could not sign on their own), seeking the commission of three officers, Archibald McGuire, George Shrum and Matthew Dill, of an additional company for the protection of the Westmoreland County frontier. Ca. 1790-91.

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This petition, signed by 58 Scotch-Irish settlers of the western frontier of Pennsylvania, must have been appreciated by Governor Mifflin, as it showed the settlers’ lack of confidence in the ability of the federal government to protect the frontier. Following the defeat of Harmar’s expedition in 1790, President Washington appointed Arthur St. Clair, Mifflin’s political rival and immediate predecessor, to build a string of forts along the western frontier. According to the petitioners, the positioning of these forts left much to be desired.

Item #25609, $5,500

Newspaper Belonging to John Quincy Adams Reports Transfer of the Floridas to the U.S.

[JOHN QUINCY ADAMS], Newspaper. Western Monitor, August 7, 1821. Lexington, Kentucky: William Gibbes Hunt. Issue owned by John Quincy Adams; Report on Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819. 4 pp, 14½ x 20½ in.

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This issue contains an inside page report of the U.S. taking possession of Florida from Spain under the terms of the Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819. This issue was owned by, delivered to, and read by John Quincy Adams (the “Adams” in the Adams-Onís Treaty) when Adams was the Secretary of State in the James Monroe administration. “Hon. John Q. Adams” is written in contemporary brown iron gall ink in the top blank margin on the front page, indicating that this issued was delivered to Adams while he was serving as Secretary of State.

Item #23822, $3,500

Many of the leading Jews of Newport and New York sign 1818 land sale from estate of Benjamin Seixas to Oliver Hazard Perry

[EARLY AMERICAN JUDAICA]. NAPHTALI PHILLIPS, Manuscript Document Signed, 1p, folio, 14½ x 21½ in., November 30, 1818.

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Elaborate receipt for Newport, Rhode Island sale of land from estate of Benjamin Seixas (1747-1817) signed by numerous members of his family and members of the Spanish-Portuguese Jewish Congregation who were heirs to the property, known now as the Buliod-Perry House at 29 Touro Street, to Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, the great naval hero of the Battle of Lake Erie in 1813.

Item #25466, $18,000

Confederation Congress sends proposed Constitution to the states for ratification

[U.S. CONSTITUTION], Newspaper. The Pennsylvania Packet, and Daily Advertiser. October 1, 1787 (No. 2700), Philadelphia: John Dunlap and David C. Claypoole, including the September 28 resolution of the Confederation Congress to send to the states for ratification the recently completed U. S. Constitution. 4 pp., 12 x 18¾ in.

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Item #24135, $4,750

Rare document of Newport Jewish leader Moses Seixas – who wrote address that elicited George Washington’s most famous statement on religious freedom and citizenship

MOSES SEIXAS, Manuscript Document Signed, to William Channing, December 18, 1788. Receipt for carpeting. 1 p., 7¼ x 4 in.

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Seixas’ 1790 letter of welcome elicited the first president’s most compelling statement on religious liberty, “to bigotry no sanction.” In this 1788 receipt, Seixas signs a receipt documenting payment for carpet by William Channing, the state’s new attorney general.

Item #25418, $20,000

Very early mention of Chicago in archive relating to French and American foundations of Illinois, St. Louis, and Kansas City

[WESTWARD EXPANSION], 11 Handwritten Documents, 1815-1843, centering around George H. Kennerly and his wife Alzire Menard Kennerly, daughter of pioneer fur-trader Pierre Menard. Four are written in French. 21 pp., most approximately 8 x 10 in. Documents have expected toning. A few have some tears on folds and holes with small text loss.

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Genl Mr Johnson and myself rode up from the foot of the Rapids, yesterday to this place. we have had no news from the Troops on Rock River for some days, they were all well when heard from. report from Chicoga says that the hostile Indians, are all trying to get across the Missippi again, the last that was heard from them they were high up on Rock River.

(George Kennerly, during the Black Hawk War, June 10, 1832)

This reference to “Chicoga” is rare this early. From 1825 to 1831, Chicago was a hamlet of about 100 residents in Peoria County. In 1831, Cook County was organized. The next year, many white settlers in northern Illinois fled to Chicago to avoid Black Hawk’s forces. By 1833, when Chicago was organized as a town (a year after this letter), it still only had about 350 residents.

Even earlier letters in the archive, by fur trader, St. Louis pioneer, and first lieutenant governor of Illinois Pierre Menard, and by three of his daughters, and son-in-law George Kennerly, offer glimpses into a pioneering bilingual community. The Menard, Gratiot, Chouteau, and other French creole families founded St. Louis, Kansas City, and additional cities in the Mississippi and Missouri River valleys.

The archive starts with an 1815 power of attorney signed by George Kennerly, with the very rare signature of pioneer fur trader Charles Gratiot who certifies it. Includes the first letter in English written by Alzire Menard, to her soon-to-be-husband George Kennerly. This archive illuminates several facets of American Westward Expansion. It ends with a poignant letter of Amadee Menard, celebrating her 23rd birthday, and contemplating whether she would live to see her 24th birthday: “It is ever thus with those who are young and possess buoyant spirits. Time will soon tell what fortune has in store for me…” Unfortunately, Amadee died ten months later.

Item #25331, $9,500

James Madison on Jay’s Treaty, Revolution in the Netherlands, and Virginia Politics

JAMES MADISON, Autograph Letter Signed, to William Branch Giles, April 3, 1795, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 2 pp., 8¼ x 12¾ in.

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the arrival of the Treaty has not added a particle to the public knowledge of its contents... Amsterdam with all that country have bowed to the standard of Liberty...nothing remains in the way of a quiet & compleat establishment of a third Republic on the rights of man....

I see by the newspapers that your constituents have been so uncivil to the hired preachers and prophets of a change in the public mind of Virginia as to adhere by an unanimous vote to their former representative....

Two Democratic-Republican Congressmen from Virginia share criticism of Jay’s Treaty, admiration for the spread of the French Revolution to the Netherlands, and updates on recent elections.

Item #25368, $7,500

The Prospectus of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures

[ALEXANDER HAMILTON], Newspaper. Gazette of the United States, September 10, 1791. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: John Fenno. 4 pp., 10 x 16 in. The prospectus is printed on the front page in three columns.

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Contrasting with the agrarian view of many Virginia founding fathers, New Yorker Alexander Hamilton saw an industrial future for the United States. After nearly two years of study and with the aid of Assistant Secretary Tench Coxe, Secretary of the Treasury Hamilton compiled his famed Report on Manufactures at the request of Congress. With the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures, Coxe and Hamilton advocate creating the nation’s first public-private partnership to develop the area around the Great Falls of the Passaic River, using the cataract for power.

Item #30014.06, $2,500

Secretary of State Pickering certifies five Acts of Congress relating to the Whiskey Rebellion, debtor’s prison, the estate of General Nathanael Greene, etc.

TIMOTHY PICKERING, Document Signed, five acts passed by the first session of the Fourth Congress, ca. June 1796, [Philadelphia]. 4 pp., 8 x 13½ in. Each act bears printed signatures of President George Washington, Speaker of the House Jonathan Dayton, and President of the Senate, pro tempore, Samuel Livermore. Secretary of State Timothy Pickering certifies with his signature that five acts of Congress are “Deposited among the Rolls, in the office of the department of State.”

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The printed acts include: An Act to regulate the compensation of Clerks, May 30, 1796; An Act for the relief of persons imprisoned for debt, May 28, 1796; An Act Providing relief to the owners of stills with the United States, for a limited time, in certain cases, June 1, 1796;

An Act Making an appropriation to satisfy certain demands attending the late insurrection; and to increase the compensation to jurors and witnesses in the courts of the United States, June 1, 1796; and An Act To indemnify the estate of the late Major General Nathanael Greene, for a certain bond entered into by him, during the late war, June 1, 1796.

Item #25081, $6,500

Thomas Jefferson signed Act of Congress approving four new Brigadier Generals to defend the frontier; the new Legion became America’s first standing army

THOMAS JEFFERSON, Printed Document Signed, as Secretary of State, “An Act supplemental to the act for making farther and more effectual provision for the protection of the frontiers of the United States,” Philadelphia, March 28, 1792. 1 p., 9½ x 15¼ in.

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it shall be lawful for the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint such number of brigadier generals as may be conducive to the good of the public service. Provided the whole number appointed or to be appointed, shall not exceed four.

Congress passed this bill after General Arthur St. Clair’s disastrous defeat at the Wabash River.

Item #24811, $18,000

Relieving Persons in Debtors Prison

EDMUND RANDOLPH, Document Signed as Secretary of State. An Act to continue in force the act for the relief of persons imprisoned for Debt and An Act to alter the time for the next annual meeting of Congress, May 30, 1794. Philadelphia: Childs and Swaine. Signed in type by George Washington as President, John Adams as Vice President, and Frederick Muhlenberg as Speaker of the House. 1 p., 8¼ x 13½ in.

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Item #24428.04, $3,750
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