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The Gettysburg Address – First Day of Printing, Lowell

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, Lowell Daily Citizen & News, Lowell, Mass., November 20, 1863. 4 pp., 17 ½ x 23 in.

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“It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us; that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain...”

This rare first day of publication newspaper contains Lincoln’s timeless embodiment of American ideals on page 2. This printing from November 20, a day after the speech, includes a report on the ceremonies, and mentions Edward Everett’s speech (calling it “long,”). The text of this Massachusetts newspaper closely follows the Boston Daily Advertiser’s text, which varies slightly from the AP versions.

Item #23307, $10,000

The Gettysburg Address – Front Page News

GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, The New York Times, November 20, 1863. (Gettysburg Address on p. 1, col. 3. Reporting on the event starts on p. 1, col. 2. Everett’s speech on pp. 2-3.) 8 pp., 15¼ x 20¾ in.

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“It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on.”

A rare first day of publication newspaper, with Lincoln’s timeless embodiment of American ideals prominently placed. This printing from November 20, the day after the Address, contains Lincoln’s speech on the front page. This original issue also includes Edward Everett’s speech and a report on the ceremonies.

Item #23318, $9,500

The Gettysburg Address – First Day of Printing, Boston

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, Boston Evening Transcript, Boston, November 20, 1863. 4 pp., 17½ x 23 in.

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“…Three cheers were here given for the President and the Governors of the States…”

This rare first day of publication newspaper contains Lincoln’s timeless embodiment of American ideals on page 4. This printing from November 20, a day after the speech, includes Edward Everett’s entire speech, and a report on the ceremonies. Mercifully, the afternoon paper adjusts two widely reported textual errors—one in Associated Press versions, and the other in a competing Boston newspaper from earlier that day.

Item #22513, $7,500

The Gettysburg Address, with Full Centerfold Illustrations of the Battlefield and Lincoln’s Dedication Ceremony

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, Newspaper, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, New York, December 5, 1863. 16 pp., complete.

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“and that Government of the people, for the people, and for all people, shall not perish from earth.”

As printing technology advanced through the middle decades of the nineteenth century, illustrated newspapers grew in popularity even though their engravings added a few weeks to press time. Leslie’s printing—from December 5—includes an article containing the full text of Lincoln’s timeless speech (page 11). Illustrations include a centerfold spread with the formal dedication ceremony prominently placed, and smaller views of Union and rebel graves, defensive works, Meade’s headquarters, and a view of the town (centerfold).  A large illustration of “The War in Tennessee—Lookout Mountain and Its Vicinity” appears on the front page.

There is no definitive text that captures exactly how Lincoln spoke that day, though the AP reporter’s text is most familiar. Leslie’s printing, following the Philadelphia Enquirer version, contains variations, most notably in the final two sentences regarding the nation’s unfinished work and closing phrase of “Government of the people, for the people, and for all people” rather than “of the people, by the people, and for the people.”

Item #23577.01, $2,750

General Schofield’s Personal Gettysburg Official Records

[GETTYSBURG; GEN. JOHN M. SCHOFIELD], Books, 3 Volumes – The War of the Rebellion: Gettysburg Official Records, devoted to the Battle of Gettysburg. Owned by Union General John M. Schofield (with his stamp in first volume).

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Item #23060, $750

A Union Officer’s Commission, and Field Report from
the 17th Connecticut Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg

[CIVIL WAR – GETTYSBURG], Allen G. Brady, Autograph Manuscript, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1863. 6 pp., in pencil, an unsigned draft or retained copy.

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A field report from the Battle of Gettysburg by Major Allen G. Brady, commander of the 17th Connecticut Regiment, written on the 4th of July, 1863, the day after the battle ended in a great victory for the Union.

“We had not more than time to form before the enemy were discovered advancing rapidly upon us on our right & a full Brigade obliquely towards our left….our fire was so destructive it checked their advance the troops on our left giving way the enemy came in behind us but we still remained firmly at the stone wall until the rebels were driven back.”

Item #21808, $7,500

Battle of Gettysburg Prisoner of War Broadside:
Confederate Guards Shooting Unarmed Yankees

[GETTYSBURG], Broadside. The Gettysburg Prisoners. March from Gettysburg to Staunton, 175 Miles..., Annapolis, Maryland, September 28, 1863, 14½ x 6 in., 1 pp.

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“At the request of a large number of my fellow Bell Island, prisoners of War, I have written a short sketch from my notes taken on the spot, and have put the same in type. The account imbraces [sic] from the 2nd of July at Gettysburg, Pa., up to September 21st, on Bell Island. The statement is facts only, and not from an imaginary brain….

Union private George Gantt exposes the dismal treatment of Union prisoners of war after the Battle of Gettysburg.

Item #22245, $1,750

From the Battle of Gettysburg to the Gettysburg Address, Rare Civil War-era Run of the Daily Evening Express, Lancaster, PA

[GETTYSBURG], Newspapers, Daily Evening Express, bound volume, May 7, 1863—April 29, 1864, Lancaster, Pa., each issue 4 pp., 15¾ x 21¾ in. Published Monday thru Saturday, No evidence of removed issues; approximately 300 issues total.

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“…during the day General Buford drove a regiment of rebel infantry out of Gettysburg. They retreated in a north easterly direction….”

This rare run of a Pennsylvania newspaper includes a printing of President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address in the Nov. 21, 1863 issue.  Other issues include reports of the battles at Gettysburg, Chancellorsville, the siege of Vicksburg, and much more. Accounts relating to the Battle of Gettysburg first appear in the July 1, 1863 issue, which noted Buford’s action against the Confederate Army.  There is no issue for Saturday, July 4 (the day after the battle), possibly due to the holiday. No pages appear to have been removed from the volume in this section.

Item #22113, ON HOLD

General George Meade Assumes Command
of the Army of Potomac

GEORGE MEADE, Broadside. General Orders No. 67. Head-Quarters, Army of the Potomac [Frederick, Md.], June 28, 1863. 1 p., with manuscript docketing “Recd July 21st 1863.”

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Item #22700, $1,750

The Gettysburg Address

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. Includes a foldout map of the planned cemetery and a copy of Lincoln’s dedication. Published in Harrisburg, 1864. Fair condition.

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Report of the Select Committee Relative to the Soldier’s National Cemetery, Together with the Accompanying Documents, as Reported to the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, March 31, 1864.

Item #21371, $1,750