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Responding to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Invalidation of Anti-Discrimination Laws, a New Jersey Congressman Unsuccessfully Attempts to Ensure Civil Rights at the Start of the Jim Crow Era

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. JOHN HILL, Broadside. Assembly No 13., State of New Jersey. An Act to Prevent Discrimination against Any Person on Account of his Race, Creed or Color. Large folio sheet, with numbered lines, printed for the use of the legislature. [New Jersey], Introduced January 9, 1883.

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“Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, That no person shall be denied the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities and privileges of all hotels, inns, taverns, restaurants, public conveyances on land or water, theatres and places of public resort or amusement, because of race, creed or color…”

Item #24742, $1,250

Theodore Roosevelt on Americanism

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Autograph Letter Signed, to Charles P. Bryan, New York, March 18, 1888. 3 pp. on one folded leaf, 4 x 6 in.

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"The term American refers to what a man is, not to what his birth place was..."

Roosevelt’s essay, “Americans Past and Present and the Americanization of Foreigners,” appeared as the lead article in the second issue of the Chicago publication, America: A Journal for Americans, on April 14, 1888.  The correction Roosevelt requested in this letter was made, and the sentence appeared in print as “In the first place, ‘American,’ as a political term, has to do with what a man is, not with what his birthplace was; for many of the most honorable names in our history are those of men born outside of our limits.”

Item #24502, ON HOLD

Mary Lincoln’s Signed Copy of The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France

MARY LINCOLN, Signed Book. “Mary Lincoln. / 1878,” in her copy of Charles Duke Yonge, The Life of Marie Antoinette Queen of France, 2d rev. ed. (London: Hurst and Blackett, 1877), xvi, 432 pp., 8vo. bound in tooled purple cloth boards with titled spine. A carte-de-visite portrait of Mary Lincoln has been affixed to the front free endpaper.

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she bore her accumulated miseries with a serene resignation, an intrepid fortitude, a true heroism of soul, of which the history of the world does not afford a brighter example.

Item #24759, $6,000

Theodore Roosevelt Regrets He Couldn’t Convince Dark Horse Candidate Supporters to go to John Sherman at 1884 Republican National Convention

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Autograph Signed Letter to John Sherman in reference to the 1884 Republican National Convention. July 12, 1884. 2 pp. 4 ½ x 7 in. on two adjoining black-bordered sheets.

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While his brother William Tecumseh Sherman shirked a political career, John Sherman was a lifelong public servant. Here, he attempts to gain the Republican presidential nomination for the second time.

Item #24118, $2,800

Incredible William T. Sherman re Robert Anderson and Start of Civil War in Kentucky

WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, January 6, 1878, to Eliza Anderson, the widow of General Robert Anderson, Washington, 12 pp., 7¾ x 9¾ in.

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Sherman recounts the events in Kentucky at the start of the Civil War, and pays tribute to fellow general Robert Anderson, in a touching letter to Anderson’s widow. The letter offers insights into both Anderson’s and Sherman’s lives and careers.

Item #23842, $12,500

Approving Treaty Limiting Chinese Immigration - A Rarity from James Garfield’s Brief Presidency

JAMES A. GARFIELD, Partly Printed Document Signed, as President, May 9, 1881, 1 p. 8 x 10 in.

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“I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to cause the Seal of the United States to be affixed to my ratification of a treaty relating to Chinese immigration into the U.S. signed at Peking Nov. 17, 1880…”

Item #24142, $12,000

Unique Garfield Presidential Appointment of a Great-Grandson of Moses Austin to Replace his Father as Postmaster of Benham, Texas

JAMES ABRAM GARFIELD, Document Signed (“James A. Garfield”) as President, 1 p., folio, Washington D.C., February 18, 1881 (but actually signed after March 4 and before July 2, 1881), partially printed and accomplished in manuscript, appointing William J. Bryan as Postmaster of Brenham, Washington County, Texas; countersigned by Thomas L. James as Postmaster General. Gold Post Office seal with two red ribbons affixed to lower left; folding creases; some blearing to last three letters of signature; small loss at meeting of two folds; faint offset to signature from seal.

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Garfield’s presidential documents are rare. He was inaugurated on March 4, and shot by a crazed office-seeking assassin, Charles Guiteau, on July 2. Garfield lingered until September 19, but was unable to fulfil his presidential duties. Though this document is dated two weeks before Garfield took office, given the time it took for preparation and presentation for signing, this was not an unusual practice. The Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate records Bryan’s nomination by President Rutherford B. Hayes, on February 11, 1881, and approval by the Senate on February 18. The clerk did make an error, though, conflating the appointee and his town, writing “William J. Brenham” in the second name blank. Besides the general rarity of Garfield’s presidential documents, we have seen very few of his documents relating to Texas.

Item #24707, $9,000

William Jennings Bryan’s Second Populist Run
at the White House

[WILLIAMS JENNING BRYAN], “The Issue--1900: Liberty, Justice, Humanity.” Columbus, Ohio, Neville Williams, 1900. Chromolithograph, printed by the Strobridge Lithograph Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 20 x 30 in; edges slightly trimmed, very faint mat toning; laid down on canvas.

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“No Crown of Thorns / No Cross of Gold / Equal Rights to All / Special Privileges to None”

William Jennings Bryan tried for the White House in 1896, 1900, and 1908. The leading supporter of “free silver” against the gold standard, and a champion of the “little guy” against moneyed Eastern businessmen and bankers, Bryan came closest to victory in 1896.

Item #24250, $9,000

Sherman, Enjoying People and Traveling,
Writes to Friends in St. Louis

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Mrs. Julia Turner. New York, NY, September 29, 1886. 3 pp., octavo.

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Item #23562.09, $900

Sherman Works to Convince his Friend’s Widow (and Soon-to-be Likely Mistress) that She Just Needs Some Lovin’

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Mrs [Mary] Audenried. St. Louis, Missouri, June 9, 1884. 8 pp octavo, On Sherman’s imprinted stationery.

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Sherman trashes his wife’s devotion to the Catholic Church, discusses avoiding the great danger of being nominated to run for the presidency, and tries to convince his late chief-of-staff’s widow that she is not crazy, but simply needs a man’s company.

Item #23562.08, $6,500

Sherman’s “Insanity” For Saying 200,000 Men Would be Needed to Fight the Civil War

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to E.V. Smalley. St. Louis, Missouri, November 13, 1883. 3 pp., 5 x 8 in. On Sherman’s imprinted stationery. With an endorsement initialed by Smalley requesting the change be made if possible.

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After having recently stepped down as Commanding General of the Army, Sherman reviews a biographical article. While explaining the story of his being labeled insane in 1861 for believing that 200,000 Union troops would be needed, he asks that Secretary of War Simon Cameron’s name be left out. Smalley published his article in the Century Magazine, January 1884.

Item #23562.07, $5,000

Sherman on His Saddle – His One “Honest Relic” of the March to the Sea

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Colonel Herbert E. Hill. Washington, D.C., December 6, 1881. 4 pp., 5 x 7¾ in. On “Headquarters Army of the United States” stationery. Laid onto a larger sheet of paper.

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“Yesterday the Hon. S. B Bowman called …  asking the loan of “the sword or sabre I wore” during the famous March to the Sea … I explained to Mr Bowman that the truth was I did not have a sword or sabre during that march, nor at any time after I succeeded General Grant in the command of the Western Armies at Nashville March 1864.” 

Item #23562.05, $4,250

J.P. Morgan Signed Northern Pacific Railroad Company Stock

J.P. MORGAN, Partially Printed Document Signed as Company Trustee. 100 Shares of fully paid shares of one hundred dollars each of preferred stock to Drexel Morgan & Company. January 27, 1881. Signed by Frederick Billings as president and Robert L. Belknap as treasurer. With large signature of Morgan on verso dated June 24, 1881.

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Item #21697, $950

Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to General Henry Cist. Washington, D.C., November 7, 1879, 12 pp., 5 x 7¾ in. On “Headquarters Army of the U.S.” stationery.

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Sherman clarifies promotions of some of the Union’s most iconic generals, going back to the Civil War, and when U.S. Grant assumed the presidency and Sherman came to command the entire army.

Item #23562.04, $5,500

William Tecumseh Sherman on the Army’s Role in Building the Northern Pacific Railroad

WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Autograph Letter Signed, April 5, 1883, to E.V. Smalley, Washington, D.C., on Headquarters Army of the United States. 3pp.

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Sherman comments on the close cooperation of the Army and the railroads. Key to the development of the American West, this was arguably the Army’s most important role during Sherman’s post-Civil War service.

Item #23562.06, $1,750

“Let Us Have Faith that Right Makes Might…”

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN] SCHUYLER COLFAX, Autograph Quote Signed, from Lincoln’s Cooper Institute speech given on February 27, 1860. Sept 10, 1877.

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Schuyler Colfax, U.S. representative from Indiana and vice president under Ulysses S. Grant, pens a famous quote from Lincoln’s Cooper Institute speech.

Item #23916, $950

“The Chambered Nautilus” by Oliver Wendell Holmes

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES, Autograph Manuscript Signed, The Chambered Nautilus, 1890. Boston, April 13, 1890. 3 pp., 7 x 4½ inches. With later notation in French, in hand of M. Bentson (?), signed and dated Boston 1893 on verso.

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Among his most famous poems, Holmes wrote The Chambered Nautilus in 1858. Here, he writes it out in full and signs it in 1890.

Item #23829, $3,750

Harry Truman’s Notebook for Kansas City Law School
Night Classes

HARRY S. TRUMAN, Autograph Manuscript Notebook, [Kansas City, Missouri, ca. November 20, 1924–January 29, 1925]. 48 leaves, in pen and pencil, on a removable pad of no. 2 memo paper, inserted in a limp mottled brown leather binder, the front cover gilt with the logo of the Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Co. and gilt-lettered “Things to do Today” and “Harry S. Truman.” The front pastedown is stamped with the name of Phoenix Mutual representative Edwin H. Green. 5 x 3 in. In maroon buckram folding case.

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“Section I must be learned in detail and as a whole… learn by heart”

Item #23833, $18,500

The First Full-term African American Senator Signs a Deed

BLANCHE BRUCE, Document Signed. Land deed. Washington, D.C. September 30,1890. Signature panel 8¼ x 3½ in., overall dimensions 8¼ x 14 in. Framed.

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Blanche Bruce was the first full-term African American to serve in the U.S. Senate, 1875-1881. He was then appointed by President James Garfield as Register of the U.S. Treasury in 1881. He later served as the Washington, D.C. Recorder of Deeds (a position earlier held by Frederick Douglass), 1890-1893 and again as Register of the Treasury from 1897 until his death in 1898.

Item #22945.04, $525

Printing and Reporting Texas’s Ratification
of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments

[THIRTEENTH AMENDMENT], Pamphlet. Certified Copy Of A Letter From J. J. Reynolds, Brevet General, U. S. A., Commanding the Fifth Military District .... Washington, D.C., 1870. 84 pp., 6 x 9 in. Disbound.

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Item #22697, $750
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