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Presidents and Elections

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Governor Ronald Reagan Opposes Withholding of State Income Tax

RONALD REAGAN, Autograph Letter Signed as governor of California, to Mary Boatman, June 2, 1967. 1 p. 8 x 10 in. Address penned by secretary, and then letter penned by Reagan.

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The poll this time was most interesting, particularly on 'Withholding.' This is the one area I feel it's necessary to hold out even if the poll is against me. Withholding may make it easier to pretend you aren't being taxed but it's also easier for govt. to raise taxes without getting a protest from the people....

Item #24387, $3,500

Ulysses S. Grant, The Military Savior of the Union

[ULYSSES S. GRANT], Patriotic Milk Glass Vase. Height 6 inches. With a transfer portrait of General Grant in uniform as Major General, with hand-painted decorations over the entire surface. The vase has a bulbous body, sloping shoulder, tapering neck and flared rim. Some observers have remarked that its form and decoration seem to have been influenced by the Orientalist school of art popular in America and Europe in the nineteenth century. Circa 1865 – 1868, possibly for Grant’s presidential campaign.

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Item #24359, $4,500

Theodore Roosevelt Supports World War I Draft, and Criticizes Wilson for Preventing His Volunteers from Preparing and Going to Aid of France

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to Otis Henderson Cutler. [New York, NY], April 25, 1917. 3 pp., 8½ x 11 in. Extensively annotated in black ink by Roosevelt, on Metropolitan Magazine stationery. With: A typed fair copy of Roosevelt’s April 25 letter incorporating his corrections (possibly prepared by the recipient), 3 pp.; With Cutler’s retained carbon copy of his May 14 response to Roosevelt, offering himself as a volunteer, 1 p.; With a follow-up letter from Roosevelt to Cutler discussing in detail Wilson’s refusal to deploy the divisions, consisting of a printed cover letter, May 25, 2 pp., with stamped signature, and its original attachment, a circular letter informing the volunteers that President Wilson had refused to deploy them, signed in type by Roosevelt, May 21, 3 pp.

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“I ask that our country’s record in this war be kept in line with the heroic deeds of the past. Let us, for our own sake, at once send troops to France”

A remarkable letter of support for universal military service, for immediate involvement in World War I, his willingness to aid the effort by raising troops with Congressional authorization, and his reaction to President Wilson’s refusal to allow Roosevelt’s volunteer troops to be deployed in France before the draft army was ready. With three related documents.

Item #23954.01-.04, $6,500

Declaration of Independence William Stone/Peter Force Facsimile, 1833

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, Copperplate engraving printed on thin wove paper. Imprint at bottom left, “W. J. STONE SC WASHn” [William J. Stone for Peter Force, Washington, D.C. ca. 1833]. Printed for Peter Force’s American Archives, Series 5, Vol I. 25¼ x 30⅞ in.

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Item #24402, $35,000

Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures

BENJAMIN OWEN TYLER, Broadside, Drawn by Tyler and engraved by Peter Maverick, [Washington, D.C., 1818]. 1 p., 23⅞ x 31 in., archivally framed to approx. 32 x 40 in.

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“In Congress, July 4th 1776. The Unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America.”

Item #23683, $25,000

The Declaration of Independence
Rare Broadside Printed and Posted in July, 1776

[DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE], Broadside. [Exeter, New Hampshire: attributed Robert Luist Fowle], [ca. July 16-19, 1776], two-column format, sheet size approx. 15⅛ x 19⅝ in. Pin holes in three corners, with the upper-left corner torn in approx the same position, indicates that this was posted publicly to spread the momentous news.

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Broadsides such as this fanned the flames of independence. Passed from hand to hand, read aloud at town gatherings, or posted in public places, broadsides (single pages with print only one side) were meant to quickly convey news. Including the present copy, there are fewer than a dozen examples of this Exeter, N.H. printing known. Pin holes in three corners and the torn upper-left corner suggest this example was posted publicly.

In a way, this Declaration broadside is even more “original” than the signed manuscript pictured by most Americans. This is not yet “The Unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States,” but rather “A Declaration, by the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress assembled.” On July 4,  New York’s delegation abstained from voting for  independence. After replacing their delegates, New York joined the other 12 colonies.

Moreover, as here on the broadside, the July 4 Declaration was signed by only two men: Continental Congress President John Hancock and Secretary Charles Thomson (here with the common variant “Thompson”). After New York on board, Congress resolved on July 19 to have the Declaration engrossed with a new title: “The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America.” Most of the 56 signers affixed their names on the engrossed document on August 2, 1776, with some added even later.

Thus, broadsides such as this one preserve the text of the Declaration of Independence as it actually was issued in July of 1776.

Item #21991.99, PRICE ON REQUEST

Reagan’s Pitch for a Reality Radio Series Based on His Yearling Row Ranch

RONALD REAGAN, Autograph Manuscript, c. 1953, unsigned, in pencil, on Reagan’s “Yearling Row” stationery. 13 pp.

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Do you know what it is like to be awakened at 2 AM of a dark foggy night by a telephone call from the Sheriff’s office? Your cattle have gone through the fence and are blissfully headed for Ventura blvd.’”

Item #24285, $8,000

Theodore Roosevelt Advocates American Entry into World War I and Revisits His Foreign Policy Maxim:
“Speak softly and Carry a big stick”

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Printed Document with Autograph Endorsement Signed and 42 corrections in Roosevelt’s hand. “Address Delivered to the Illinois State Bar Association.” Chicago, Ill., April 29, 1916. With Roosevelt’s note at the top of the first page: “Dear Mr. McCh’ny [MacChesney?], Here is the speech, with a few merely verbal corrections, sincerely, Theodore Roosevelt.” 8 pp., 7 x 24 in. (the last page is 7 x 8 in.).

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The complete text of an address by Theodore Roosevelt at a dinner given in his honor at the Hotel La Salle, Chicago, by the Illinois Bar Association on April 29, 1916. These proof sheets were sent to TR for his approval, and returned with 42 autograph corrections in pencil.

“I once used the phrase, to sum up our proper foreign policy:— ‘Speak softly and carry a big stick.’  There was a good deal of laughter over that phrase. But it expresses a pretty sound policy all the same. Remember, that I was President seven years and a half and that I never spoke with wanton harshness of any nation. I always spoke softly, I was always just as nice and polite as any man could be. But I carried a big stick!”

Evoking applause and laughter, Roosevelt also references the need for national preparedness considering the world situation, referencing Pancho Villa and Mexico, Germany and the war in Europe, the sinking of the “Lusitania,” and the need for national unity, paraphrasing Lincoln, “nowadays America can not endure half hyphenated and half not.”

Item #24383, $75,000

While Running for the Democratic Presidential Nomination, Senator Barack Obama on Transparency and Limiting the Power of Special Interests

BARACK OBAMA, Typed Manuscript with autograph corrections. [Chicago, Ill., ca. May 21, 2007]. 2 pp, 8 ½ x 11 in. With 112 handwritten words in Obama’s red ink and pencil and 3 holes punched at left edge of each sheet. Published on the “Commentary” page of the Chicago Tribune, May 21, 2007.

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“When it comes to reforming Washington … Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis had the right idea. Sixty years ago he said, ‘Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman.’ Brandeis was a progressive responding to the excesses of the Gilded Age. Nearly a century later, we find Washington in need of a lot of sunlight and disinfectant….

I’m not perfect. In my current pres. campaign, I shall have to raise money, and still have relationships w/lobbyists. But at least people will know who those relationships are...”

Over a year before he became the Democratic candidate for President, Senator Barack Obama addressed the issue of lobbyists, special interest groups, and campaign financing.  Obama’s message was published in the Chicago Tribune on May 21, 2007.  Obama’s careful edits, with over 100 words and many strike-outs in his hand, likely came too late for the editorial page deadline of this major metropolitan newspaper. Most of the text Obama wished to be struck remained, and several phrases he did not strike through (noted below in parentheses) were removed, possibly by the editorial page editor.

Item #22930, $7,500

Zachary Taylor Denies Commenting on the Wilmot Proviso and Says Stories Alleging His Intemperance “are too frivolous and absurd to be noticed”

ZACHARY TAYLOR, Letter Signed to Mr. Edward W. Lincoln. August 26, 1848. 1 p. 8¾ x 10¾ in. With original envelope addressed to “Mr Edward W. Lincoln / Worcester / Mass.”

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Item #24117, $4,500

1860 Republican Party Roll Call from the Chicago Wigwam Convention that Nominated Lincoln for the Presidency

[REPUBLICAN PARTY], Broadside, “Roll of the National Republican Convention, Chicago, May 16th, 1860,” Chicago, 1860, 14⅜ x 20½ in.

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Exceedingly rare broadside containing a complete list of the members of the National Committee and Delegates. Printing the vote counts of 26 States and the District of Columbia. Representing the southern slave owning states are: Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Texas, and Virginia.

Item #24111, $3,750

Registration for FDR’s Customized
1936 Ford Phaeton—Signed as President

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Document Signed as President.

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Roosevelt’s Ford Phaeton was customized with special hand controls that allowed the polio-stricken president to drive under his own power without using his legs. The car is now at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library and Museum.

Item #24243, ON HOLD

Wilson Endorses DAR’s Plan to Involve Children of Immigrants in Public Schools, and “Share the Opportunities of this Great Country”

WOODROW WILSON, Typed Letter Signed as President to Everett M. Raynor. Washington, D.C., April 22, 1915. 1 p. 7 x 8¾ in. On White House letterhead.

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“as an American… I believe that if they will take to heart the lessons of our history, they will be able to help the country to even greater things than it has done yet”

Item #24120, $1,500

Former President and Future Confederate Supporter John Tyler Forcefully Defends the Fugitive Slave Act and the “Southern Cause,” Attacks the NY Press, and Plays up His Own Service in the War of 1812

JOHN TYLER, Autograph Letter Signed and Autograph Manuscript Signed several times in the third person. Sent to S. Cunningham, from Sherwood Forest, October 12, 1850, 1 page, 9⅜ x 7¼ in. on blue paper marked “Private,” being the cover letter for the manuscript, written for anonymous publication: “The fugitive slave bill and Commissioner Gardiner,” [ca. October 12, 1850], 2 pages, 9⅜ x 7⅞ in. on blue paper.

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In the first fugitive slave law case, which came before his cousin Commissioner Gardiner: “The fugitive was promptly dealt by and restored to his owner in Baltimore. Mr. Gardiner has proven himself to be a faithful public servant, an honest man, and a Patriot. And yet, by a certain class of Editors in New York he is sneered at…”

Tyler criticizes two NY editors in particular: Now what jackasses are Mssrs Herricks and Ropes… These would-be somethingarians [a colloquialism, usually used as an insult] in the first place, deem it a matter of censure in a judge, to execute the law—and, in the next they show their ignorance… by ascribing to Mr. Tyler under their witty soubriquet of Captain (a title he is well content to wear since he enjoyed it during the war of 1812 with Great Britain)…”

Item #24043, $24,000

President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed “A. Lincoln” as President, to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, May 23, 1863. “Executive Mansion, Washington” stationery, 2 pp. on one sheet, 7¾ x 9¾ in. With front panel of original envelope, to which Lincoln has added an Autograph Note Signed, and Stanton has also added an Autograph Note Signed.

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Less than six years after he successfully sued the Illinois Central for legal fees, President Lincoln faces another problem with the railroad, now vital for the transportation of Union troops. In another dispute over payments, he tells his Secretary of War, “If I had the leisure which I have not, I believe I could settle it; but prima facie it appears to me we better settle the account ourselves...”

Item #22131, $60,000

Eisenhower Signed D-Day Message

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, Broadside Signed in dark blue ink. Statement to the soldiers, sailors and airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force on June 6, 1944. Document is approx. 5¾ x 9½ in., archivally framed to approximately 22 x 14 in.

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From a limited edition of Eisenhower’s Crusade in Europe, (New York: Doubleday & Co., 1948), limited to 1,426 copies. The war had ended only three years earlier, and Eisenhower must have been looking towards politics - he was elected to the Presidency in 1952.

Item #24122, $6,500

President Harry S. Truman’s Presidential Proclamation Announcing the End of the War in Europe

HARRY S TRUMAN. [WORLD WAR II], Printed Document Signed as President. Washington, D.C., May 8, 1945. 1 p., 15 x 21½ in.

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“The Allied armies, through sacrifice and devotion and with God’s help, have wrung from Germany a final and unconditional surrender … The victory won in the West must now be won in the East. The whole world must be cleansed of the evil from which half the world has been freed…”

Item #24220, $20,500

Andrew Jackson Signs a Patent on a Corn Shelling Machine

ANDREW JACKSON, Partially Printed Document Signed as President. Two partially printed vellum pages acknowledging that Joseph Ross has developed improvements for “the machine of shelling corn.” Washington, D.C., April 12, 1833. Countersigned by the Acting Secretary of State Edward Livingston and Attorney General Roger B. Taney. Approximately 11 x 13, framed to 20 x 31 in. The blind embossed paper Seal of the United States is affixed at lower left. The pages are attached with pink ribbon to the above letters patent.

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Item #23910, $4,500

Woodrow Wilson Protests the Sinking of Lusitania & Threatens to Break Diplomatic Relations – About a Year Before America Enters WW I

WOODROW WILSON, Signed Pamphlet. Address of the President of the United States Delivered at a Joint Session of the Two Houses of Congress, April 19, 1916.Washington, D.C., ca April 19, 1916. Bound in blue cloth boards with titled spine with several blank leaves. Spine cracked but binding intact, very minor marginal tear to title page, other pages lightly toned with a light vertical crease but clean overall. 7 pp., 5¾ x 9 in.

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Item #24100, $2,500

AN EXTRAORDINARY RARITY!
Leaves From George Washington’s Own Draft of His First Inaugural Address

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Autograph Manuscript, Pages 27-28, 35-36, and 47-48 of Washington’s own draft of his undelivered inaugural address. [written ca. January 1789]. 6 pp. on 3 leaves, 7 x 9 in.

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“This Constitution, is really in its formation a government of the people”

George Washington understood that the new government’s success, as had the Constitutional Convention’s, rested squarely on his shoulders. He also knew that everything he did as the first president would set precedents for future generations. He wrote privately about the promise, ambiguity, and tension of high office, and these same themes are woven throughout his original, undelivered inaugural address. Would the government work as intended, or suffer death from a thousand cuts? Still, the former Commander in Chief recognized the nation’s potential, as well as the honorable men who had come together to build the Constitution.

The three unique leaves—six pages—offered here are written entirely in Washington’s hand. They include assertions that government power is derived from the people, and a highly significant section of the Address explicitly arguing that the Constitution is subject to amendment and, by implication, advocating the adoption of the Bill of Rights. They also include the oratorical climax of the address—arguably the most visionary and impassioned passage of the address.

Item #23845-47, $1,200,000
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