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Monroe Expands on his Doctrine in Last Annual Message
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Apparently unrecorded, this broadside extra prints President Monroe’s last annual message to Congress, delivered on December 7, 1824. Covers relations with Great Britain, the slave trade, Indian relations, the comprehensive survey of possible road and canal sites in the interior, and an elaboration on the Monroe Doctrine, providing the rationale for exhorting European states not to interfere with the evolution of the newly independent Latin American states. “Separated as we are, from Europe by the great Atlantic Ocean, we can have no concern in the wars of the European governments, nor in the causes which produce them. The balance of power between them, into whichever scale it may turn, in its various vibrations, cannot affect us. It is the interest of the United States to preserve the most friendly relations with every power, and on conditions fair, equal, and applicable to all. But in regard to our neighbours, our situation is different. It is impossible for the European governments to interfere in their concerns, especially in those alluded to, which are vital, without affecting us …

JAMES MONROE. Broadside. Albany Argus - Extra. Albany, N.Y.: Edward Croswell, December 10, 1824. 1 p., large folio broadside in 6 columns, text extracted from the National Journal, Extra, December 7, 1824. 21 ¾ x 15 ½”.

Inventory #30001.02       Price: $2,750

Excerpts:

If we look to the whole, our growth, as a nation, continues to be rapid beyond example … Our expansion over the vast territory within our limits, has been great … a population devoted to our happy system of government, and cherishing the bond of union with fraternal affection …”

“Our revenue, under the mild system of impost and tonnage, continues to be adequate to all the purposes of the government. – Our agriculture, commerce, manufactures and navigation flourish … For these blessings we owe to Almighty God, from whom we derive them, and with profound reverence, our most grateful and unceasing acknowledgments …”

Under the act of the 30th April last, authorising the President to cause a survey to be made with the necessary plans and estimates of such roads and canals, as he might deem of national importance, in a commercial or military point of view, or for the transportation of the mail, a board has been instituted, consisting of two distinguished officers of the corps of engineers and a distinguished civil engineer, with assistants … Considerable progress has been made in it, but the survey cannot be completed until the next season. It is gratifying to add, from the view already taken, that there is good cause to believe that this great national object may be fully accomplished …”

In execution of the laws for the suppression of the slave trade, a vessel has been occasionally sent from that squadron to the coast of Africa, with orders to return thence by the usual track of the slave ships, and to seize any of our vessels which might be engaged in that trade. None have been found, and, it is believed, that none are thus employed. It is well known, however, that the trade still exists under other flags …”

“In turning our attention to the conditions of the civilized world, in which the United States have always taken a deep interest, it is gratifying to see how large a portion of it is blessed with peace.—The only wars which now exist within that limit, are those between Turkey and Greece, in Europe, and between Spain and the new governments, our neighbors in this hemisphere. In both these wars, the cause of Independence, of Liberty, and Humanity, continues to prevail … it is evident that Spain, as a power, is scarcely felt in it. These new States had completely achieved their independence, before it was acknowledged by the United States, and they have since maintained it, with little foreign pressure … these new states are settling down under governments elective and representative in every branch similar to our own. In this course we ardently wish them to persevere, under a firm conviction that it will promote their happiness. In this, their career, however, we have not interfered, believing that every people have a right to institute for themselves the government which, in their judgment, may suit them best. Our example is before them, of the good effect of which, being our neighbors, we leave it, in the expectation that other powers will pursue the same policy … Separated as we are, from Europe by the great Atlantic Ocean, we can have no concern in the wars of the European governments, nor in the causes which produce them. The balance of power between them, into whichever scale it may turn, in its various vibrations, cannot affect us. It is the interest of the United States to preserve the most friendly relations with every power, and on conditions fair, equal, and applicable to all. But in regard to our neighbours, our situation is different. It is impossible for the European governments to interfere in their concerns, especially in those alluded to, which are vital, without affecting us; indeed, the motive which might induce such interference in the present state of the war between the parties, if a war it may be called, would appear to be equally applicable to us. It is gratifying to know that some of the powers with whom we enjoy a very friendly intercourse, and to whom these views have been communicated, have appeared to acquiesce in them …”

“The condition of the Aborigines within our limits, and especially those who are within the limits of any of the States, merits likewise particular attention. Experience has shown, that unless the tribes be civilized, they can never be incorporated into our system, in any form whatever. It has likewise shown, that in the regular augmentation of our population, with the extension of our settlements, their situation will become deplorable, if their extinction is not menaced. Some well-digested plan, which will rescue them from such calamities, is due to their rights, to the rights of humanity, and to the honor of the nation … To remove them … by force, even with a view to their own security and happiness, would be revolting to humanity, and utterly unjustifiable …”

Condition

Three small holes taking a few letters. Very good copy which has been folded and is lightly wrinkled.


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