Seth Kaller, Inc.

Inspired by History


Browse by Category

Abraham Lincoln

African American History

Albert Einstein

Alexander Hamilton

Books

Civil War and Reconstruction

Constitution and Bill of Rights

Declaration of Independence

Early Republic (1784 - c.1830)

Finance, Stocks, and Bonds

George Washington

Gettysburg

Gilded Age (1876 - c.1900)

Great Gifts

Inauguration and State of the Union Addresses

Israel and Judaica

Maps

Pennsylvania

Presidents and Elections

Prints

Revolution and Founding Fathers (1765 - 1784)

Science, Technology, and Transportation

Thomas Jefferson

War of 1812

Women's History and First Ladies

World War I and II

Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln

Sort by:
« Back
Page of 5 (91 items) — show per page
Next »

Abraham Lincoln Suspends Habeas Corpus and Army Orders Officers to Resist Writs

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Edwin M. Stanton, General Orders, No. 315, September 17, 1863, conveying President Lincoln’s Proclamation Suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus Throughout the United States, September 15, 1863. Printed Document. Proclamation signed in type by Abraham Lincoln and William H. Seward; Order signed in type by Assistant Adjutant General E. D. Townsend, by order of the Secretary of War. 2 pp., 5 x 7⅜ in.

   More...

I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do hereby proclaim...that the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus is suspended throughout the United States....

Item #24901.01, $375

A New York Soldier’s Affidavit Allowing
a Proxy to Vote in the 1864 Election

[CIVIL WAR], Partially Printed Document Signed by James M. Smith, countersigned by Jerome B. Parmenter, and Captain Joseph H. Allen. Richmond, Virginia, October 18, 1864. 1 p., 8 x 12½ in. With printed envelope restating affidavit’s claim on the outside.

   More...

Item #21264.05, $375

Union League of Philadelphia Supports Lincoln on Emancipation, African-American Troops in 1864

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. HENRY CHARLES LEA, Printed Pamphlet. No. 18: The Will of the People, [January – April 1864]. 8 pp., 5½ x 8½ in.

   More...

The will of the people is supreme.

The vital principle of [Lincoln’s] whole administration has been his recognition of the fact, that our Government is simply a machine for carrying into effect THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE.

Item #24899, $250

‘Rally round the Flag, Boys!’ President Lincoln Centerfold

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, October 1, 1864. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

This October, 1864 issue of Harper’s Weekly has a magnificent centerfold engraving of President Lincoln—perfect for framing—with a patriotic poem below.

Item #H 10-1-1864, $225

Lincoln, the War, and Emancipation

[EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, June 11, 1864. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

Featuring illustrations of Philadelphia Sanitary Fair Central buildings, and Generals Gouverneur Warren and Horatio Wright on the front page. “Belle Plain, Virginia General Grant’s Late Base of Supplies”; “Army of the Potomac—General Warren Rallying the Marylanders”; “President Lincoln and His Secretaries”; Centerfold: “Army of the Potomac—Struggle for the Salient, near Spottsylvania [sic], Virginia, May 12, 1864”; three illustrations of the environs of Spottsylvania [sic] Court House; “Sherman’s Advance—General Logan’s Skirmishes Advancing Toward: the Railroad at Resaca”; and “Sherman’s Advance—Position of Osterhau’s Division on Bald Hill.”

Item #H 6-11-1864, $150

Lincoln Reviews the Army of the Potomac

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 2, 1863. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

Collecting confiscated rebel cotton. Ironclad Keokuk sinking after the battle at Charleston. Pres. Lincoln, General Hooker, and their staff at a review of the Army of the Potomac. Bombardment of Fort Sumter.

Item #H-5-2-1863, $100

“MEN OF COLOR To Arms! To Arms!”

Frederick Douglass, Broadside. “Men of Color / To Arms! To Arms!” Philadelphia: U.S. Steam-Power Book and Job Printing Establishment, Ledger Buildings, Third and Chestnut Streets, [ca. mid-June to mid-July, 1863.] Signed in type by Frederick Douglass and 54 others, including many prominent African American citizens. 1 p., 44 x 87 in.; framed to 48 x 94 in.

   More...

A monumental Frederick Douglass Civil War recruiting broadside.

This most dramatic and important recruiting poster signals a seismic shift in policy. African American men had joined Union forces in limited numbers from the start of the Civil War, but it took Abraham Lincoln’s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, to officially allow, encourage, and remove barriers to their enlistment.

Item #22552, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Supporting McClellan against Lincoln in 1864 Campaign Pamphlets

[CIVIL WAR], Book. Hand-Book of the Democracy, a collection of 39 pamphlets. New York: Democratic Central Executive Campaign Documents, 1864; New York: Society for the Diffusion of Political Knowledge, 1863-1864. 33. Original printed wrappers with wrapper title, as issued. 5¾ x 8¾ in. Sabin 30204.

   More...

This remarkable collection of campaign pamphlets from the presidential election of 1864 includes 17 pamphlets issued by the Democratic Central Executive Campaign Committee and 22 pamphlets published by the Society for the Diffusion of Political Knowledge. Together, they constitute a vindication of Democratic candidate and former general George B. McClellan and a harsh condemnation of Abraham Lincoln, his administration, and the northern conduct of the war.

Item #23744, SOLD — please inquire about other items

“Honest Abe” Lincoln Admits to Skirting the Truth with his Wife

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, to John Rosette, editor of the Springfield Republican, February 20, 1857, Springfield, Ill. Headed “Private” in Lincoln’s hand. 1 p., 7½ x 9⅝ in.

   More...

Headed “Private” in Lincoln’s hand, this unique letter reveals an awkward intersection of domestic and national politics and an instructive insight into the marriage of Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln. Here, Lincoln admits to not being truthful with his wife on the small matter of purchasing a copy of a new partisan newspaper, a year before the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates. “When the paper was first brought to my house, my wife said to me ‘now are you going to take another worthless little paper,’ I said to her evasively, I had not directed the paper to be left. From this, in my absence, she sent the message to the carrier. This is the whole story.

Item #21190.99, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Lincoln Assassination and Its Aftermath:
Read the Day-by-Day Coverage in New York Newspapers

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Archive of newspapers related to the assassination and the hunt for the conspirators. Approximately 450 pp. From 11-1/2 x 16-1/2 in. to 23 x 31 in. per issue, depending on the title; most 15-1/2 x 23 in.

   More...

A remarkable archive of 54 issues of six different daily and weekly New York newspapers from the six weeks after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, with coverage of the assassination, the assassin, the funerals in New York and Springfield, and the hunt for the conspirators. Also includes one issue from July 1865 regarding the execution of the conspirators and one issue from February 1866 with coverage of a memorial service in Lincoln’s honor.

Item #30031.01, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Abraham Lincoln Mourning Badge

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN ASSASSINATION], Ferrotype mourning badge. April-June 1865. A ½-inch circular ferrotype image of Lincoln, with “A. Lincoln” printed above, covered in black cloth, backed by a black-and-white silk mourning rosette with a pair of black ribbons below. 3 x 7 in. An exceptional example.

   More...

Item #24352, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Abraham Lincoln Famous Nomination Photograph (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Platinum print photograph, 20½ x 26½ inches. One of three images taken by Alexander Hesler on June 3, 1860 in Springfield, Illinois. After the war, Philadelphia photographer George B. Ayres purchased Hesler’s studio and negatives. This massive print was enlarged from Hesler’s negative by Ayres ca. 1897, with original blind stamp in each of the lower corners, “G. B. Ayres, Copyright 1897.” Framed to 30¾ x 37½ inches.

   More...

Item #24690, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Emancipation Proclamation, Gen. Orders No. 1, First Edition of First War Department Printing, Bound with First Editions of Gen. Orders 2-201, Jan. to June 1863

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Printed Document. Emancipation Proclamation. Signed in type by Lincoln, Secretary of State William H. Seward, and Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas. General Order No. 1, War Department, Adjutant General’s Office, Washington January 2, 1863, 3pp., intended for all military commanders in the field. Dated in print January 2, but, consistent with the time it normally took for military orders to be published, it likely came out closer to January 7. Earlier separate printings are very seldom available. (Eberstadt: Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation # 12.)

Bound together for Army paymaster Major N.S. Brinton with a 26-page handwritten subject index followed by separately printed and paginated orders from Jan. 1 to June 30, 1863. Brinton or a clerk apparently wrote the index as the orders were received. Since a printed index would have been available soon after the last order, it was likely bound in 1863. This sammelband also contains General Orders Affecting the Volunteer Force, Adjutant General’s Office, 1862. Washington: Government Printing office, [ca. March] 1863, with printed subject index, pp I – LVI, and pages 1-158.

   More...

“All persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free.”

Also Bound with an 1863 Compilation of General Orders Affecting the Volunteer Force… for Jan. to June 1862, including the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Item #23692, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally (SOLD)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Autograph Letter Signed, to John Hickman. Springfield, Ill., July 29, 1860. 1 p., 4½ x 7 in. With original envelope addressed to Hickman in Lincoln’s hand, with “Free” and “Springfield, IL July 30” postmark. [Lincoln didn’t have the franking privilege at the time, but it was free to send mail to members of Congress.]

   More...

John Hickman, a pro-slavery Pennsylvania Democrat, became fervently anti-slavery over Buchanan’s moves to expand slavery into Kansas. Hickman migrated into the “anti-Lecompton” wing of the Democratic party, then towards the Know Nothings, and finally becoming a founder of the Republican Party. In the May 1860 Wigwam convention that chose Lincoln as the Republican Presidential nominee, Hickman was a candidate for the vice presidency; he came in third, after Hannibal Hamlin and Cassius Clay.

At a July 24, 1860, Philadelphia rally, with the nominees in place, Congressman Hickman made his case in support of Lincoln and Hamlin against the “extravagant and unconstitutional demands” of the South regarding the expansion of slavery. “We can only make it effectual in one way—by the support of Mr. LINCOLN. He is honest and capable, and attached to the principles of the Constitution, and his election will assign limits to sectional oligarchy, and make labor honorable and remunerative....” Less than a week later, Lincoln received a copy of the speech from Hickman and thanked him with this brief letter. Clearly, the battle lines of the watershed election of 1860 had been drawn.

A significant portion of Hickman’s speech was soon printed in pamphlet form attached to Lincoln’s already famous Cooper Union speech. Titled The Republican party vindicated--the demands of the South explained : Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, at the Cooper Institute, New York City, February 27, 1860. The pamphlet adds to Lincoln long excerpts from Hickman’s speech, pieces arguing against the Democratic candidate Stephen Douglas (“The Dred Scott Decision and Douglas’ Endorsement Thereof,” and “Practical Operation of Douglas’ ‘Non-Intervention.’”), and his running mate (“Herschel V. Johnson’s Views”).

To accompany our letter, we include a first edition of the pamphlet (#24290.03).  A digital copy of the whole pamphlet can also be seen:  https://archive.org/details/republicanparty00linc

Item #23781, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Compensated Emancipation Proposal

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, Pa., March 7, 1862. 8 pp., 15½ x 20½ in. With “Message from the President...Resolved, That the United States ought to co-operate with any State which may adopt gradual abolition of slavery.” [Printing Lincoln’s March 5 message to Congress on page 1.]

   More...

The United States is the only nation in history to end slavery through Civil War. Nations as diverse as Russia, the British Empire, France, Brazil, and others around the world ended their reliance on slave labor through legislative means that included some form of compensation to slave owners for their lost “assets.” Here, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports on the front page that Lincoln presented a special message to Congress with a plan to end slavery through compensation. There would be no takers among the slaveholding border states.

Item #30001.28, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address and the 13th Amendment Ratified (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Book. The Tribune Almanac and Political Register for 1866, New York, N.Y., The Tribune Association, 1865. 96pp., 5 x 7½ in.

   More...

Item #30007.002, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln Orders a National Day of Thanksgiving in Honor of the Union Victory at Gettysburg

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN]. [THANKSGIVING], Broadside. Proclamation of Thanksgiving. Massachusetts, [probably Boston], ca. July 27-August 6, 1863. 1 p., 20 x 28 in.

   More...

Lincoln’s first call for a national day of Thanksgiving.

Item #23584, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Republican “Wide Awakes” Determine to Resist the Expansion of Slavery “by all constitutional means.” (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Manuscript Document. Constitutions and minutes from five manifestations of the Woonsocket, Rhode Island, Republican Party organization. Woonsocket, R.I., 1856 – 1864. Including the 1860 “Wide Awakes.” 121 pp. (nearly half blank), 8 x 11 in.

   More...

An anti-slavery Republican Party campaign record ledger from Woonsocket, Rhode Island, 1856 to 1864, including the handwritten “Wide Awakes” constitution and minutes from the 1860 election.

Item #22220, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Lincoln’s Former Home, and Lee’s Surrender (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 20, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

Item #H-5-20-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Funeral Procession in New York City

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 13, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

   More...

Item #H-5-13-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items
« Back
Page of 5 (91 items) — show per page
Next »