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Civil War and Reconstruction

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Edwin Stanton Prelude to Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

EDWIN M. STANTON, Autograph Letter Signed as secretary of war, to Major General Henry W. Halleck on War Department letterhead. Washington, D.C. April 26, 1866. 2 pp., 7¾ x 9¾ in.

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I am still tugging at the oar as hopelessly & almost as painfully as a galley slave”

Item #21929, $3,750

Rogers Group: Taking the Oath and Drawing Rations

JOHN ROGERS, Painted plaster sculpture, “Taking the Oath and Drawing Rations,” on front of base; “Patented / Jan 30 1866” on rear. Base measures 8.5 x 13 in., height is 23 in.

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Item #21673, $1,500

The Defense in Ex parte Milligan Argues That Even During War the Federal Government Can’t Use Military Trials Where Civilian Courts Are Operative

[LAMBDIN P. MILLIGAN], Printed Book. D. F. Murphy, reporter, Supreme Court of the United States. In the Matter of Lambkin [sic] P. Milligan, William A. Bowles, Stephen Horsey, Under Sentence by Military Commission. Argument of David Dudley Field, Esq. for the Petitioners. March 12 and 13, 1866. New York: Williams J. Read, 1866. 97 + 104 pp., 6⅝ x 10⅛ in.

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Court reporter records the impassioned defense, before the U.S. Supreme Court, by David Dudley Field of Lambdin P. Milligan and others, who were tried by military commission in Indiana during the Civil War and sentenced to death for disloyal activities. The court’s landmark decision agreed with Field’s reasoning that the federal government could not employ military tribunals where civilian courts were in operation.

Item #25148, $1,250

Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant Signs a Carte-de-Visite (SOLD)

ULYSSES S. GRANT, Photograph. Carte-de-visite signed “Lt. Gen. U.S. Grant U.S.A.” St. Louis, Mo., J. A. Seibert, photographer. 2¼ x 4 in. Inlaid in old window mount, with “Mrs Banlche” [?] in Grant’s hand on verso.

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Item #23209.02, SOLD — please inquire about other items

“The South Has Learned Nothing and Forgotten Nothing”

[CIVIL WAR / RECONSTRUCTION], Pamphlet. “Is the South Ready for Restoration?” [Lindley Smith]. Stamped “From Board of Publication of the Union League of Philadelphia.” 20 pp., 5⅞ x 9 in.

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Item #21856.06, $150

Illinois Governor Richard Yates’ Fourth of July Address at the End of Civil War – Unhappy that the Nation Would not Execute Jefferson Davis

[CIVIL WAR & RECONSTRUCTION]. RICHARD YATES, Printed Pamphlet. Speech of Hon. Richard Yates, Delivered at Elgin, Ill. on the Fourth Day of July, A.D. 1865. Jacksonville, IL: Ironmonger and Mendenhall, 1865. 8 pp., 6⅛ x 9½ in.

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The American revolution was begun and fought through for an idea—to establish that man is a man—to vindicate the right of every man to equal rights and to equal citizenship…. Every boy imbibes the genius of our free institutions. The poor friendless rail splitter rises to the proudest pinnacle of human power. [Cheers] The poor tailor boy becomes and is now our President, [cheers] the ferry boy the Chief Justice of our Supreme Court, (cheers) and the humble tanner boys become the great commander, who marshals a million of veteran warriors in the great cause of union and liberty, and holds up the flaming symbol of emancipation to a whole race of mankind. (Applause.)” (p1/c2 – p2/c1)

And yet, for Jeff Davis, who has been a wholesale murderer, who has struck at the life of the whole nation, and rolled the red wave of bloody civil war over the land, they say we must be magnanimous. [Sensation.] We shoot the poor deserter and the poor soldier who is found sleeping at his post on guard, but the nation must be magnanimous and not execute Jeff Davis!” (p6/c1)

Item #24904, $350

Rare Houston Texas Newspapers: the Juneteenth Order Freeing Slaves, Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, and Much More

Juneteenth, Newspaper. Houston Tri-Weekly Telegraph, July 19, 1865. Newspaper. Houston, TX: E. H. Cushing. 4 pp., folio. Partial loss of up to two lines at bottom, but not touching the full printing of the Emancipation Proclamation, issued by Lincoln on January 1, 1863 (p3/c2) or Union General Gordon Granger’s June 19, 1865 order implementing it. With Houston Tri-Weekly Telegraph, July 15, 1863, with belated printing of the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, issued by Lincoln on September 22, 1862.

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The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of [personal]rights and rights of property, between former masters and slaves and the connection heretofore existing between them, becomes that between employer and free laborer.

According to historian Henry Louis Gates, Juneteenth, first celebrated in 1866, initially was an “occasion for gathering lost family members” and “measuring progress against freedom.”[1] In 1980, Juneteenth became aholiday in Texas, the first emancipation celebration granted official state recognition, through the efforts of legislator Al Edwards. Juneteenth is now aholiday in the District of Columbia and forty-seven states—all but Hawaii, North Dakota, and South Dakota.



[1]Henry Louis Gates, “What is Juneteenth?” June 17, 2013, The Root.

Item #26129, PRICE ON REQUEST

An Eloquent Farewell to His Troops from a Massachusetts General Who Marched to the Sea with Sherman and Fought in the Civil War’s Last Battle

WILLIAM COGSWELL. CIVIL WAR, Manuscript Document Signed. General Orders No. 14. [Farewell to the Army of Georgia], Near Washington, D.C., June 9, 1865. 1 p., 7¾ x 12 in.

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Brigadier General William Cogswell offers a dramatic farewell message to the troops under his command in the Army of Georgia. A Salem, Massachusetts lawyer, Cogswell turned his law office into a recruiting station after learning the 6th Massachusetts had been attacked in Baltimore. He was first in, last out, in his Civil War service: In 24 hours, he raised the first full company of the war (Company C, 2nd Massachusetts Volunteers) and his brigade fought in the final battle of the war in Bentonville, North Carolina. Despite his relative obscurity, Cogswell’s eloquence rivals the great farewell messages in military history.

Item #23320, $7,500

Lincoln’s Former Home, and Lee’s Surrender (SOLD)

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 20, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Item #H-5-20-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Funeral Procession in New York City

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 13, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Item #H-5-13-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Nation Mourns

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, May 6, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Engravings include: Lincoln and son Tad at home. Scene at the death bed of President Lincoln. Funeral service at the White House. Ford’s Theatre. Attempted assassination of Secretary Seward. Citizens viewing the body at City Hall, New York.

Item #H-5-6-1865, $750

Lincoln’s Assassination

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Newspaper. Harper’s Weekly, April 29, 1865. 16 pp., complete, disbound.

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Item #H-4-29-1865, SOLD — please inquire about other items

“Black bellied Yankees” at The Battle of Fort Blakely

FREDERICK MORTIMER CRANDAL, Autograph Letter Signed, to Julian E. Bryant. “Up the Alabama,” April 25, 1865. 4 pp.

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A Union colonel, in command of the 48th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops, writes to his friend, Col. Julian E. Bryant, of the 46th Regiment of U.S.C.T., recounting his regiment’s  part in the Battle of Fort Blakely. “We have had hard marching & hard fighting. A week in trenches & a successful charge. The ‘Black bellied Yankee’ made their mark … everyone gives us credit for doing well & I think we did excellently well.My loss was not very heavy, not over thirty all told. The other Regts in my Brigade suffered much more severely on the last charge, I being held in reserve & not being under fire but a few moments, they did gallantly…

Item #21813, $3,000

Gideon Welles Announces Lincoln’s Assassination to the Navy

[GIDEON WELLES], Printed Document Signed in print as Secretary of the Navy. General Order No. 51, Navy Department. Washington, D.C. April 15, 1865. Black border, issued just hours after the president’s death. One page with integral blank, 5½ x 8½ in.

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Item #23915, $2,500

First Printing of Robert E. Lee’s General Orders No. 9 (SOLD)

[ROBERT E. LEE], Broadside Signed in type “R. E. Lee, General”: “General Orders No. 9”, “Head Quarters Army Northern Virginia [near Appomattox Court House], April 10th, 1865.” Very rare unrecorded variant.

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“With unceasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell.”

Item #20833, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Union Flag Flown over Richmond
on the Day of Union Occupation (SOLD)

[CIVIL WAR], Ephemera. 36-star Union flag flown over Richmond on April 3, 1865. Inscribed on header in yellowed ink by probable owner “J.H. Jones Pvt.”, with an additional inscription (possibly stenciled) “C. M. Fisher.” 122½ x 54 in.

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The Stars and Stripes returned to Richmond, Virginia, on April 3, 1865, the day of Union occupation. As soon as federal troops stormed the fallen Confederate capital, U.S. flags were hoisted all over the city. This 36-star flag was one of the first flags raised above Richmond that day. It is believed to have been owned by a Private J.H. Jones, a Union soldier.

Item #21674, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Illustrator Frank Leslie Publishes Fanciful Grand Reception of Civil War Notables as a Subscription Premium

[ABRAHAM LINCOLN], Lithograph. “Grand Reception of the Notabilities of the Nation, at the White House 1865,” New York: Frank Leslie, [April] 1865. 1 p., 19 x 23¾ in.

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Frank Leslie published this print as a premium for his new family magazine, Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, and copyrighted it on April 8, 1865, just a week before Lincoln’s death. The image, created by engraver Henry B. Major and lithographer Joseph Knapp, portrays Lincoln, flanked by the First Lady and Vice President Andrew Johnson, greeting Julia Dent Grant, wife of Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant who stands nearby.

According to a notice printed at the bottom right corner, “Every Person who pays Ten Cents each for numbers 1 and 2 of Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, The New Family Paper, is entitled to a copy of this PLATE without extra charge,” or individuals could purchase the print for $3.

Item #25618, $2,000

Civil War Veteran in Maryland Predicts the War Will End Soon

DAVID F. MCGOWAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Ellen [P. Fowler?], March 15, 1865, Ellicott’s Mills, Maryland. 3 pp., 5x 8 in. Also includes DAVID F. McGOWAN, Autograph Letter Signed, to Ellen [P. Fowler?], May 9, 1865, Ellicott’s Mills, Maryland. 4 pp., 5 x 8 in.

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Sherridan has been doing some good work. 1400 prisoners passed here a few days ago that he captured And Report says he has captured 1000 more. A couple of officers stopped here last night, that had just been exchanged. They were captured last August and gave me a good account of their trials & tribulations down in Dixie. One of them gave $100. for a common pair of shoes from all appearances the Confederacy will soon collapse. Sherman has been heard from, is at Fayetteville, N. C. think Richmond will fall, before fall.

Civil War veteran David F. McGowan writes about prospects for Union victory and life in Maryland as the Civil War draws to a close.

Item #24471, $380

New York Soldier Tells His Sister They Plan to Finish the War Soon

RICHARD SLADE, Autograph Letter Signed, to his sister Mary A. Slade, March 10, 1865, 3 pp.

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Those four legged Grey backs have about played out but there is a plenty of two legged ones here yet....We are going to try & Cleanse out these Johneys this summer & come home next winter

Item #21265.11, $150

A White Captain in the U.S. Colored Troops, Richard Andrews, Describes his Closing Days of the Civil War and its Aftermath

[CIVIL WAR – UNION]. RICHARD ANDREWS, Six letters to his wife Libby, approx. 15 pp. in all.

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“There will be an awful hot time if our Brigade is engaged. I dont think anything can restrain the men if they once get started. I am in hopes to come out alive, but no one can tell but the Almighty”

Item #22399, $1,500
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