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Eleanor Roosevelt Stands
for Civil Rights – Her Four Freedoms (SOLD)

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed as First Lady, to Addie Frizielle. Washington, D.C., May 13, 1944. 1 p., 6 1/8 x 9¼ in. On White House stationery, with original envelope.

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The First Lady defends her advocacy of civil rights: “I doubt if it does any people anywhere any harm to tell them that you believe they are entitled to certain rights and you are willing to see them obtain those rights” and counters the writer’s fear of using mixed-race bathrooms at work: “if you have to use the same toilets and wash basins...[and] are nervous, there are certain precautions which you can always take.”

Item #22780, SOLD — please inquire about other items

The Atlantic Charter (SOLD)

[FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT & WINSTON CHURCHILL], Broadside. The Atlantic Charter, August 14, 1941. Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, 1943. #1943-0-517133. 28½ x 40 in. Designed by W. A. Dwiggins.

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In the months before U.S. entry into World War II, Roosevelt and Churchill agree on goals and the shape of the world after the final destruction of the Nazi tyranny.”

Item #22438, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms Speech – Inscribed and Signed by FDR – in the “Missy” LeHand Archive

FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT, Printed Document Signed, Press Release, January 6, 1941. Inscribed “‘Another’ for M.A.L.” 7 pp., Offered as part of The FDR - Marguerite A. “Missy” LeHand Archive.

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No realistic American can expect from a dictator’s peace international generosity, or return of true independence, or world disarmament, or freedom of expression, or freedom of religion–or even good business. Such a peace would bring no security for us or for our neighbors.

The Missy LeHand Archive, comprising some 1,400 pieces, is the most important grouping of original documents still in private hands from such a central figure in FDR’s political and personal life. In conjunction with Glenn Horowitz Booksellers, we are offering the archive, intact, directly from Ms. LeHand’s heirs.

Highlights of the archive include more than forty signed Presidential Addresses, mainly rare Press Release printings from the day the speeches were delivered in 1937-1941. In addition to the Four Freedoms Speech, this group includes his first Inaugural Addresses, his December 1940 “Arsenal of Democracy” speech, fireside chats, and other historic addresses.

Missy’s official papers long ago moved to the FDR Library in Hyde Park; this collection constitutes the personal letters, signed books, photos and documents she received from her boss. The FDR Library in Hyde Park has working drafts of a number of these speeches, and official printed copies, but does not have signed copies of most. In fact, for many of the addresses here, it is literally impossible for a better FDR association copy to come on the market, ever.

Item #25712, PRICE ON REQUEST

Harry Hines Woodring Political Archives and Related Material

HARRY WOODRING, Archive. Featuring a Harris & Ewing photo of Roosevelt at his desk signed and inscribed,“to Helen Woodring (wife) from her friend Franklin D. Roosevelt”. With over 30 official and other photos of Woodring and/or his wife, many being proof copies from Harris & Ewing, five acetate recordings of Woodring including the “Cabinet Series” of the “United States Government Reports” radio series with paperwork, a 1940 letter from General George Marshall, assorted certificates, calling cards, government letterheads, Woodridge family ration books in a leather case, leather jewelry/vanity case with Mrs. Woolridge’s initials and December 25, 1939 date, etc. First half 20th century.

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Item #25690.01, $2,000

Hoover Tells a Key Aide that Lindbergh Baby Kidnapping Occupies FBI in New York

J. EDGAR HOOVER, Typed Letter Signed with Initials, to John J. Edwards, March 17, 1932. 1 p., 8½ x 11 in. , 3/17/1932.

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Excerpts

““I think what you have to say about Reinecke is certainly true and I doubt whether his conceit and egotism can ever be curbed. Certainly he is a liability in a large office. I shall await the report of Clegg… but have no doubt but that it will be necessary for me to make a change.

I shall look forward with considerable interest to your report upon the Pittsburgh office and as soon as you have finished that I am planning to have you move on. I realize that the New York office may be in somewhat of a hectic situation at the present time, in view of the Lindbergh case which is taking the time of so many Agents of that office, but you may be able to get a slant on how things are running there.

Item #22439.05, $750

Einstein, Embarrassed, Chastises Ethel Michanowski for Showering Him with Gifts

ALBERT EINSTEIN, Autograph Letter Signed with initials, in German, to Ethel Michanowski, Oxford, England, May 24, 1931. 1 p.

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You have to stop giving me presents incessantly if you would like to stay in touch with me in the friendly and joyous way we have been communicating so far. I feel responsible for you spending your earnings in such a perverted way.

Item #26113, SOLD — please inquire about other items

PaineWebber Founder Signed
Lake Copper Company Stock Certificate

WILLIAM PAINE, Partially Printed Document Signed as company president. 100,000 shares of Lake Copper Company, Certificate #28509, March 10, 1922.

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Item #23086, $1,250

Women’s Suffrage Poster - Final Stretch to Ratify 19th Amendment

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE], Women’s Suffrage Poster, ca. 1920, Chicago, IL. 1 p., 14 x 22⅛ in.

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This poster declared, “If You Want Women to Vote in 1920 Cast Your ($.10 1.00 10.00) Ballot Now.” This poster likely urged supporters of the National Woman’s Party to donate a dime, dollar or ten dollars to support their efforts to gain passage of the 19th Amendment before the November 1920 presidential and congressional elections.

Item #25694, $3,500

A. A. Milne Pens a Cryptic Golf Invitation to his Close Friend Vincent Seligman

A. A. MILNE, Autograph Letter Signed “Blue”, to Vincent Seligman, c. 1920s-1930s, Chelsea, London, England. 1 p., 5½ x 7½ in.

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Item #25338, $550

Votes for Women Armband

[Woman’s Suffrage], Votes for Women felt armband, circa 1910-1920. 1½ x 24 inches.

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These armbands were worn by Suffragettes during parades and rallies leading up to the passing of the 19th Amendment.

Item #26211, $2,750

1915 Women’s Suffrage Poster

[WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE], “Vote for Woman Suffrage Nov. 2nd.” [New York, 1915]. 1 p., 13¾ x 20 in.

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Woman’s Suffrage failed in all three states that held suffrage referenda on November 2, 1915: New York, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts.

Item #25783, $5,750

Julia Ward Howe Autograph Manuscript on Suffrage, Tipped Into Limited Edition Biography

JULIA WARD HOWE, Autograph Manuscript, n.d. [ca. 1882], tipped into Laura E. Richards and Maude Howe Elliott, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, 2 vols. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1915. First edition. Two volumes in original cloth-backed boards and the scarce dustwrappers and original slipcase. Copy #438 of 450 copies of the Large-Paper Edition. [x],392,[2]; [x],434,[2] pp.

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“I believe in suffrage…. I believe in the great awakening by the womanly soul a conscience which will rise up like a flood, & sweep away the petty & effete prejudices....

This biography of Julia Ward Howe by two of her daughters, assisted by a third, is illustrated with plates and portraits, including a facsimile manuscript of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” It won the 1917 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. Special edition, including a page handwritten by Howe on women’s suffrage. Howe refers to her first interest in suffrage “about fourteen years ago.”  She helped found the New England Woman Suffrage Association in 1868, so we date it as ca. 1892, 14 years later. But she might consider her interest in suffrage to have started a bit earlier, right around the end of the Civil War.

Item #26018, $3,500

Alice Stone Blackwell Advocates Votes for Women (SOLD)

ALICE STONE BLACKWELL, Autograph Quotation Signed. 5¼ x 3¼ in. N.p., n.d.

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Item #21678.13, SOLD — please inquire about other items

“America the Beautiful” (SOLD)

KATHARINE LEE BATES, Autograph Manuscript Signed. Ca. 1911 -1929. 1 p. On the verso of Wellesley College, Department of English stationery.

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“Oh beautiful for spacious skies,/ For amber waves of grain,/ For purple mountain  majesties/ Above the Fruited plain!”

Item #24419, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Alice Stone Blackwell Signed
Suffragette Periodical Stock Certificate

ALICE STONE BLACKWELL, Partially Printed Document Signed. Five shares of the Woman’s Journal, Certificate #117, November 18, 1910.

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Item #23076, SOLD — please inquire about other items

President Theodore Roosevelt’s Controversial Views on America’s Wealth Gap and the Idea of a Death Tax

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, to Elbert Henry Gary, April 26, 1906, Washington, D.C. On “The White House” letterhead. 2 pp., 7-1/8 x 8-7/8 in.

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Discussing His “Muck-rake” Speech, Roosevelt Goes Toe-to-Toe with the Head of the ‘Steel Trust’ over the Idea of a Death Tax for America’s Wealthiest. He Takes Aim at Powerful Monopolies and the Largest Fortunes, while Condemning the Radical “socialists of the bomb-throwing persuasion.”

I utterly and radically disagree with you in what you say about large fortunes. I wish it were in my power to devise some scheme to make it increasingly difficult to heap them up beyond a certain amount.

Item #26174.02, $8,000

President Theodore Roosevelt Agrees to Write His Famous Speech Attacking Journalistic Muck-Raking as an Enemy of Real Reform

Theodore Roosevelt, Typed Letter Signed as President, to Elbert Henry Gary, the chairman of the board and president of U.S. Steel (the first billion dollar corporation), March 20, 1906, Washington, D.C. On “The White House” letterhead. 2 pp., 6-7/8 x 8-3/4 in.

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I will go to the limit in enforcing the law against the wealthiest man or the wealthiest corporation if I think he or it has done wrong; but my whole soul revolts at a campaign of foul slander waged against men, … because they have succeeded in business....

Item #26174.01, $7,500

Theodore Roosevelt Large-Format Photograph (SOLD)

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Photograph. Platinum print, c. 1902. 15¼ x 20¼ in.

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Most likely taken early in his presidency, Roosevelt is seated at his desk holding a pen in his right hand. The image has superb tone and detail.

Item #22511, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Theodore Roosevelt,
a “thorough believer in vigorous manly out-door sports,”
Warns of Sports Becoming “a permanent business” (SOLD)

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Typed Letter Signed, as Vice President-elect, to Earl Marble, editor of The Mecca. Colorado Springs, February 18, 1901. Archivally framed.

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Two weeks before taking the oath of office of vice president, Roosevelt enjoys a hunting expedition to Colorado and explains the difference between sport as salubrious exercise and pastime, and sport as big business, to a Denver newsman. In the context of his published writings on the subject, Roosevelt believed that when sports become “a permanent business,” the participants do not contribute anything to society other than their athletic prowess. Worse still, the rise of professional sports – rather than universal participation in amateur activities – was a “sign” of national “decadence,” akin to the gladiatorial contests of ancient Rome.

Item #21846, SOLD — please inquire about other items

Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Doll

[THEODORE ROOSEVELT], Rough Rider Doll, ca. 1900. Made of felt, brass, leather and linen. The face appears to be hand-painted. The head and body are filled with straw or wood shavings. 10 in.

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Item #24200, $1,100
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